•   
  •   

Tech & Science Oldest stuff on Earth found inside meteorite that hit Australia

13:20  14 january  2020
13:20  14 january  2020 Source:   reuters.com

Scientists Have Officially Found a Mineral Never Before Seen in Nature

  Scientists Have Officially Found a Mineral Never Before Seen in Nature It was found along the side of a road in a remote Australian gold rush town. In the old days, Wedderburn was a hotspot for prospectors – it occasionally still is – but nobody there had ever seen a nugget quite like this one.The Wedderburn meteorite, found just north-east of the town in 1951, was a small 210-gram chunk of strange-looking space rock that fell out of the sky. For decades, scientists have been trying to decipher its secrets, and researchers just decoded another.

A meteorite that crashed into rural southeastern Australia in a fireball in 1969 contained the oldest material ever found on Earth , stardust that predated A scanning electron micrograph of a presolar silicon carbide grain, about 8 micrometers in its longest dimension, from a meteorite that crashed into

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A meteorite that crashed into rural southeastern Australia in a fireball in 1969 contained the oldest material ever found on The oldest of 40 tiny dust grains trapped inside the meteorite fragments retrieved around the town of Murchison in Victoria state dated from about 7

a close up of food: A scanning electron micrograph of a presolar silicon carbide grain from a meteorite that crashed into Australia in 1969 © Reuters/HANDOUT A scanning electron micrograph of a presolar silicon carbide grain from a meteorite that crashed into Australia in 1969 A meteorite that crashed into rural southeastern Australia in a fireball in 1969 contained the oldest material ever found on Earth, stardust that predated the formation of our solar system by billions of years, scientists said on Monday.

The oldest of 40 tiny dust grains trapped inside the meteorite fragments retrieved around the town of Murchison in Victoria state dated from about 7 billion years ago, about 2.5 billion years before the sun, Earth and rest of our solar system formed, the researchers said.

Did asteroid that hit Australia help thaw ancient 'snowball Earth'?

  Did asteroid that hit Australia help thaw ancient 'snowball Earth'? Did asteroid that hit Australia help thaw ancient 'snowball Earth'?WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Scientists have identified Earth's oldest-known impact crater, and in doing so may have solved a mystery about how our planet emerged from one of its most dire periods.

A meteorite that crashed into rural southeastern Australia in a fireball in 1969 contained the oldest material ever found on Earth , stardust that predated A scanning electron micrograph of a presolar silicon carbide grain, about 8 micrometers in its longest dimension, from a meteorite that crashed into

A meteorite that crashed into rural southeastern Australia in a fireball in 1969 contained the oldest material ever found on Earth , stardust that predated A scanning electron micrograph of a presolar silicon carbide grain, about 8 micrometers in its longest dimension, from a meteorite that crashed into

In fact, all of the dust specks analysed in the research came from before the solar system's formation - thus known as "presolar grains" - with 60% of them between 4.6 and 4.9 billion years old and the oldest 10% dating to more than 5.6 billion years ago.

The stardust represented time capsules dating to before the solar system. The age distribution of the dust - many of the grains were concentrated at particular time intervals - provided clues about the rate of star formation in the Milky Way galaxy, the researchers said, hinting at bursts of stellar births rather than a constant rate.

"I find this extremely exciting," said Philipp Heck, an associate curator at the Field Museum in Chicago who led the research published in the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Meteorite-eating microbes could help us look for alien life

  Meteorite-eating microbes could help us look for alien life Meteorite-eating microbes could help us look for alien lifeAny extraterrestrial critters in our solar system, given the lack of obvious greenery and movement out there, are likely to be simple microbes. Perhaps they burrow deep under the Martian soil to hide from damaging ultraviolet rays. Or perhaps some lie dormant in asteroids, waiting to land in a friendlier environment. A team of researchers at the University of Vienna has tried to guess how such microbes could survive on their own, and what marks they might leave behind, by studying one of Earth’s hardiest bugs.

A meteorite that crashed into rural southeastern Australia in a fireball in 1969 contained the oldest material ever found on Earth , stardust that The oldest of 40 tiny dust grains trapped inside the meteorite fragments retrieved around the town of Murchison in Victoria state dated from about 7

Tiny dust grains trapped inside fragments date from about 7 billion years ago, long before our solar system was formed. Meteorite crashed into town of Murchison in a fireball in 1969.

"Despite having worked on the Murchison meteorite and presolar grains for almost 20 years, I still am fascinated that we can study the history of our galaxy with a rock," Heck added.

The grains are small, measuring from 2 to 30 micrometers in size. A micrometer is a one-thousandth of a millimetre or about 0.000039 of an inch.

Related Slideshow: Best space and celestial photos of 2019 (Provided by Photo Services)

Stardust forms in the material ejected from stars and carried by stellar winds, getting blown into interstellar space. During the solar system's birth, this dust was incorporated into everything that formed including the planets and the sun but survived intact until now only in asteroids and comets.

The researchers detected the tiny grains inside the meteorite by crushing fragments of the rock and then segregating the component parts in a paste they described as smelling like rotten peanut butter.

Scientists have developed a method to determine stardust's age. Dust grains floating through space get bombarded by high-energy particles called cosmic rays. These rays break down atoms in the grain into fragments, such as carbon into helium.

These fragments accumulate over time and their production rate is rather constant. The longer the exposure time to cosmic rays, the more fragments accumulate. The researchers counted these fragments in the laboratory, enabling them to calculate the stardust's age.

Scientists previously had found a presolar grain in the Murchison meteorite that was about 5.5 billion years old, until now the oldest-known solid material on Earth. The oldest-known minerals that formed on Earth are found in rock from Australia's Jack Hills that formed 4.4 billion years ago, 100 million years after the planet formed.

(Reporting by Will Dunham; Editing by Sandra Maler)

Chrysler Australia announces more details for special 300 SRT Pacer .
Limited to a total of just 50 units for Australian market, buyers will need to find $69,950 to grab one of the special retro-inspired sedans The post Chrysler Australia announces more details for special 300 SRT Pacer appeared first on Motoring Research.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!