•   
  •   

Tech & Science The Army Found a Way to Keep Your Hands Warm Without Gloves

18:50  14 january  2020
18:50  14 january  2020 Source:   popularmechanics.com

U.S. Resumes Large-Scale Operations Against ISIS in Northern Syria

  U.S. Resumes Large-Scale Operations Against ISIS in Northern Syria United States troops have resumed large-scale counterterrorism missions against the Islamic State in northern Syria, military officials say, nearly two months after President Trump’s abrupt order to withdraw American troops opened the way for a bloody Turkish cross-border offensive. The new operations show that despite Mr. Trump’s earlier demand for a complete withdrawal of all American forces from Syria, the president still has some 500 troops in the country, many of them in combat, for the foreseeable future.“Over the next days and weeks, the pace will pick back up against remnants of ISIS,” Gen. Kenneth F. McKenzie Jr.

© USARIEM Army Finds Way to Keep Hands Warm Without Gloves . Wet hands are cold hands , so you need to keep your hands dry. A good pair of waterproof gloves or A layering system consisting of lightweight or midweight liner gloves worn under warm , waterproof shells The liner gloves also

The U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (USARIEM) understands this problem and has been working on a solution for the Now the USARIEM is finally engineering a new product: a device that heats your forearms to increase blood circulation to your fingertips, all without gloves .

a close up of an animal: The U.S. Army is engineering what it calls the © Darren Boucher/Getty The U.S. Army is engineering what it calls the "Personal Heating Dexterity Device" to help warm hands and fingers in cold conditions.

Civilians know how tough it is to send a text while wearing gloves. Now imagine soldiers trying to reload ammunition with a pair of thick gloves.

The U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (USARIEM) understands this problem and has been working on a solution for the past few years. Now the USARIEM is finally engineering a new product: a device that heats your forearms to increase blood circulation to your fingertips, all without gloves.

The Accidental Experiment That Changed Men’s Lives

  The Accidental Experiment That Changed Men’s Lives The Vietnam draft lotteries functioned as a randomized experiment—which has allowed social scientists to study its life-changing effects.Inside each capsule was a small sheet, to be pulled out like the slip from a fortune cookie. But these small strips did not predict the future; they changed it. Each paper’s inscription scheduled the assignment of what scientists would call a “treatment condition”—an intervention that, from that day onward, would alter the life outcomes its subjects experienced, just as a pill randomly allocated in a pharmaceutical trial might alter a participant’s health.

The US Army has built a prototype device that allows wearers to go glove -free in freezing conditions. It works by heating the forearm, which helps keep the fingertips warm . Gloves can keep your hands at a comfortable temperature, but they often reduce dexterity. Take off your gloves , though, and

Army scientists have designed a new tool to keep hands warm without gloves . The device is an electric band placed around the forearm and run by battery. It radiates heat into the forearm to keep the arm and hands blood vessels open. In preliminary tests they found it improved finger strength by 90

It's not magic—it's just science. John Castellani, the principal investigator of the project, is a research physiologist and an expert on cold weather. Most of his work at USARIEM has been on soldier performance and reducing injuries during cold-weather operations. He tells Popular Mechanics that one of the greatest complaints among those who work outside is the stiffness of their hands in the cold elements.

"Anyone who has ever tried to do anything with their hands and fingers in the cold knows that it is hard to do when wearing gloves, because that degrades dexterity 50 to 80 percent," Castellani says. "And taking off the gloves helps, but then the hands get really cold and cannot work well anymore because of the lack of blood flow to the fingers."

This Has Been the Best Year Ever

  This Has Been the Best Year Ever This Has Been the Best Year EverEditor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

RUDE Customers Who Took It WAY TOO FAR..😠.

You need to keep your hands covered in our work environment. Gloves off. This isn’t as big of an issue for a high-tech army fighting a low-tech army but never assume that the enemy The simplest way to prove my point is to do a pull up on a metal bar. Try it once without gloves , and then again

Why Do Our Fingers Get Stiff in the Cold?

Human hands x-ray bone scan radiography © Ruben Earth - Getty Images Human hands x-ray bone scan radiography

The state-of-the-art technology that soldiers currently use to keep their hands warm is the same as in any other occupation: gloves or mittens. But that just won't cut it for those in the military who are loading ammunition, handling equipment, and treating others who are injured. The gloves restrict movement far too much to complete these tasks.

Castellani, who has been working with USARIEM on cold weather solutions since 1995, says our fingers get stiff in the cold because the harsh weather conditions have a direct impact on synovial fluid, or joint fluid, which fills the cavity between two bones and serves as a lubricant. Decreasing tissue temperatures, he says, impacts hand function in strength, power, mobility, and nerve conduction.

The biggest issue, though, is the lack of blood flow. "Warm blood coming from the core keeps the hands and fingers warmer," Castellani says. "One way to keep the hands warm is through vigorous activity; exercise will raise the core temperature, even in the cold, and that warm blood can keep the hands warm also."

U.S. Air Force warns Iran with huge show of strength as 52 fully-armed F-35A Lightning II stealth fighters worth $4.2 BILLION take off in a single wave after 'elephant walk' along Utah base runway

  U.S. Air Force warns Iran with huge show of strength as 52 fully-armed F-35A Lightning II stealth fighters worth $4.2 BILLION take off in a single wave after 'elephant walk' along Utah base runway The 52 F-35A aircrafts, which are worth a whopping $4.2 billion, took off in quick succession from the Hill Air Force Base in Utah on Monday.  The exercise carried out by the active duty 388th and Reserve 419th Fighter Wings showed the Air Force's ability to deploy a large force of the F-35As.While the exercise has been planned for several months, the execution of it came in the same week the U.S. continues to brace for Iran to respond to the drone strike killing of its most powerful general in Iraq.

Little creature comforts go a long way in miserable conditions for personal morale. The army didn’t I also found they could even be used accurately on a touch screen without removing the gloves . It doesn’t remotely keep your hands warm in cold environments and the fingers are not very sensitive

Repeating a tip for cold hands that I had passed on to a group receiving private survival training earlier today.

Castellani says runners experience this in the cold, too. They begin wearing gloves but eventually take them off as their body heats during the exercise.

Improving Circulation

a drawing of a face: Army Finds Way to Keep Hands Warm Without Gloves © USPTO/Castellani Army Finds Way to Keep Hands Warm Without Gloves

In 2018, Castellani and his team conducted a study to show heating parts of the body that are above the fingers—like the forearms or even the face—could improve blood circulation and therefore increase the temperature of participants' fingers as a result.

At the lab in Natick, Massachusetts, Castellani's team placed forearm and facial warming devices that resembled heating pads on eight test subjects. While inside a special environmental chamber that can simulate the cold—here, exactly zero degrees Celsius, the freezing point—the participants remained sedentary. Their fingers, on average, were between 10 and 11 degrees Celsius under those conditions. Once the heating devices were attached, Castellani and his team found that average finger temperature rose by about three degrees Celsius.

How Rupert Murdoch Is Influencing Australia’s Bushfire Debate

  How Rupert Murdoch Is Influencing Australia’s Bushfire Debate Deep in the burning forests south of Sydney this week, volunteer firefighters were clearing a track through the woods, hoping to hold back a nearby blaze, when one of them shouted over the crunching of bulldozers. “Don’t take photos of any trees coming down,” he said. “The greenies will get a hold of it, and it’ll all be over.”The idea that “greenies” or environmentalists would oppose measures to prevent fires from ravaging homes and lives is simply false.

The most effective way to warm your hands is to exercise, which gets the blood pumping to your muscles Put your hands in your pockets if you don’t have gloves , or stick them inside your jacket to keep Wear fingerless sweat proof gloves designed for runners. They are usually found on Amazon.

Army researchers are working on a coating to keep troops warm while cutting down on layers. Researchers are working on a way for soldiers to generate heat in cold environments instead of piling on multiple The goal is to coat gloves with the material and eventually apply it to the entire uniform.

"The magic number we would like to get to is 15 degrees Celsius, which is a breakpoint finger skin temperature," he said. "But our three-degree increase improved dexterity about 50 percent, [which is] a good start."

The Personal Heating Dexterity Device

a hand holding a baby in a blue shirt: Army Finds Way to Keep Hands Warm Without Gloves © USARIEM Army Finds Way to Keep Hands Warm Without Gloves

While coming up with a device concept, Castellani says he especially focused on reducing the power requirements for maintaining higher finger temperature. Scientists have been developing cold weather technology for various parts of the body for over 80 years, he says, but the technology isn't practical for operations. To wear any such devices, soldiers would have to carry along heavy power sources along with the rest of their load.

So the USARIEM researchers wanted to create something small and unobtrusive this time around. Castellani says they targeted forearm heating because it's "essentially just heating the tissue proximal to the hand." The scientists applied warming patches to the face because physiology says cooling the face causes constriction of the blood vessels that supply the hands and feet.

"We thought heating this area might trick the body into thinking it needed to move blood and heat there to dissipate heat," says Castellani. "It didn't prove so."

Royal Marine recruit critically ill after training accident

  Royal Marine recruit critically ill after training accident An investigation has been launched into the incident, the Royal Navy confirmed.

The final device, then, will only involve heating the forearms.

Now that the science has been proved, an engineer is working on putting the final iteration of the prototype together. It's too soon to say what the final product might actually look like, Castellani says—though the version pictured above really does look like a heating pad strapped to the arm. The biggest challenge is getting as much heat to the arm as possible without losing it to the environment, so that will be taken into consideration during the design process.

It'll be at least a few years before we start seeing the military using the personal heating dexterity device, but once it's introduced, Castellani expects a commercial version for civilians will follow shortly thereafter.

"There are many people who would like a product like this—line workers in the winter, construction workers, mechanics, winter athletes, [and] people who get really cold hands," he says.

MSN UK is committed to Empowering the Planet and taking urgent action to protect our environment against the climate crisis. We’re supporting those on the front line tackling the Australian bushfire crisis. Find out more about our campaign here.

Gallery: CES 2020 highlights: The best gadgets, TVs, laptops and more (Pocket-lint)

a group of people standing in front of a crowd

She's flying! First woman ever to pass brutal Paratroopers course is handed her maroon beret after the 28-year-old completes the toughest training outside of the Special Forces .
Captain Rosie Wild, 28, of the Royal Artillery, is the first woman to pass the All Arms Pre-Parachute Selection, the toughest military selection course outside the Special Forces. She was handed her maroon beret at a parade in Catterick, North Yorkshire. © Provided by Daily Mail Trailblazer: Captain Rosie Wild, 28, of the Royal Artillery, receives the prized maroon beret An insider said: 'It is one of the most physically demanding courses anywhere in the world and she passed it. That's an incredible achievement.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 13
This is interesting!