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Tech & Science Boeing shares epic view from Starliner crew capsule on its way to orbit

02:55  19 january  2020
02:55  19 january  2020 Source:   cnet.com

NASA delays Boeing Starliner test flight to ISS due to rocket issue

  NASA delays Boeing Starliner test flight to ISS due to rocket issue The International Space Station will have to wait a couple of extra days before meeting Boeing's Starliner for the first time.The delay is due to a "purge air supply" issue with United Launch Alliance's Atlas V rocket, NASA said.

SpaceX successfully sent a Crew Dragon sans crew to the ISS last year and is now preparing to carrying out its in-flight abort test, during which a Falcon 9 rocket Boeing will try again soon to send Starliner to the ISS and SpaceX hopes to be able to send humans to the space station later this year.

Boeing 's new Starliner capsule , on its maiden uncrewed flight to the International Space Station, has failed to attain its proper orbit after a flawless liftoff The unplanned maneuver used too much fuel, preventing the Starliner from rendezvousing with the station. NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine

a large building with a metal pole: Boeing's CST-100 Starliner launched in December. NASA © Provided by CNET Boeing's CST-100 Starliner launched in December. NASA

While the world waits for the next explosive test of the SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule, competitor Boeing has released footage of the view from inside its own new crew capsule, Starliner.

NASA selected Boeing and SpaceX to develop new spacecraft for ferrying astronauts to the International Space Station as part of the space agency's Commercial Crew program. Last month, Starliner was loaded up with cargo and a dummy and launched into orbit. While a "timing anomaly" prevented the crew capsule from making it to the ISS, it did manage to orbit and land successfully, and Boeing filmed the entire thing.

Boeing astronaut capsule faces key test on trip to space station

  Boeing astronaut capsule faces key test on trip to space station Boeing astronaut capsule faces key test on trip to space stationCAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) - Boeing Co is set to launch its new astronaut capsule on Friday on its first unmanned journey to the International Space Station, a milestone test for the U.S. aerospace firm that is vying with SpaceX to revive NASA's human spaceflight capabilities.

Getting Starliner to orbit meant the capsule absolutely had to ignite its own engines at a certain NASA and Boeing maintain that had a crew been on board, they could have taken control of the The Starliner flight was viewed as a much-needed win for the company. While the vehicle is still safe and

After a flawless launch from Cape Canaveral, Fla., the Boeing Starliner crew capsule , loaded with 600 pounds of cargo for the station, was unable A test launch of a Boeing spacecraft designed to fly astronauts to the International Space Station failed to reach orbit . There were no astronauts onboard

The above footage shows what it would be like to launch to space aboard Starliner. The dummy and everything inside the craft looks to be strapped down pretty tight, save for a plush Snoopy doll that bounces around a bit during launch, then when Starliner's thrusters fire and finally upon landing. But overall, it looks to be a surprisingly smooth ride with absolutely spectacular views.

Boeing is running a bit behind SpaceX in terms of completing the required tests before being cleared to carry actual humans to orbit. SpaceX successfully sent a Crew Dragon sans crew to the ISS last year and is now preparing to carrying out its in-flight abort test, during which a Falcon 9 rocket will be destroyed, as soon as Sunday at Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

a large building with a metal pole: Boeing's CST-100 Starliner launched in December. © NASA

Boeing's CST-100 Starliner launched in December.

Boeing will try again soon to send Starliner to the ISS and SpaceX hopes to be able to send humans to the space station later this year. 


SpaceX announces partnership to send 4 tourists into deep orbit .
SpaceX announced a new partnership Monday to send four tourists deeper into orbit than any private citizen in history has gone, without disclosing the date or price tag. The company signed a deal with Space Adventures, which is based in Washington and has served as an intermediary to send eight space tourists to the International Space Station via Russian Soyuz rockets.The first of these was Dennis Tito, who paid $20 million for an eight hour stay on the ISS back in 2001. The last to go was Cirque du Soleil founder Guy Laliberte, in 2009.

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