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Tech & Science Self-healing bacteria bricks could help us build on the moon or Mars

17:15  21 january  2020
17:15  21 january  2020 Source:   cnet.com

What your voice would sound like on other planets and moons

  What your voice would sound like on other planets and moons Acousticians sometimes speculate about how conversations might carry on alien worlds. Of course, you’d have no time to chat if you stood in the open air on Mars: Your blood would boil you to death in seconds. But what about those final screams? No matter where you are, your voice is a product of how swiftly pressure waves move through your larynx and the frequency at which your vocal cords vibrate. But when shouted into different gases of varying ­densities, the same noises take on new forms. Here’s how a few extraterrestrial atmospheres could change your tune.

"Living building materials could be used to improve the efficiency and sustainability of building material production and could allow materials to To make their bricks , the researchers blended bacteria into a "scaffold" made from gelatin and local river sand. Under the right light and other

Self - healing bacteria bricks could help us build on the moon or Mars - CNET. This construction Franken-material's alive -- and it could be a more sustainable solution for building .

Future buildings may be teeming with bacteria, with scientists developing a hybrid construction material, made of microbes, that may be capable of repairing itself or even pulling carbon dioxide out of the air.

What your voice would sound like on other planets and moons

  What your voice would sound like on other planets and moons Acousticians sometimes speculate about how conversations might carry on alien worlds. Of course, you’d have no time to chat if you stood in the open air on Mars: Your blood would boil you to death in seconds. But what about those final screams? No matter where you are, your voice is a product of how swiftly pressure waves move through your larynx and the frequency at which your vocal cords vibrate. But when shouted into different gases of varying ­densities, the same noises take on new forms. Here’s how a few extraterrestrial atmospheres could change your tune.

We ’ve talked about innovations in architecture and design in the past, and in this episode, we look at construction materials themselves and innovative

Photosynthetic bacteria also give the concrete another unusual feature: a green color. He suggested adding gelatin to strengthen the matrix being built by the cyanobacteria, and the team was intrigued. “ We took it out of the mold and held it — it was a beautiful, bright green and said ‘Darpa’ on the side.”

Wil Srubar, a professor at the University of Colorado Boulder, headed up an interdisciplinary team that used bacteria to create a durable "living" building material that would, among other tricks, be able to heal its own cracks.

That would be an especially valuable asset in extreme conditions or military structures, the scientists say, as bricks made from the material could fix themselves after natural disasters or damage from enemy fire.

"We believe this material is particularly suitable in resource-scarce environments, such as deserts or the Arctic, even human settlements on other planets," Srubar, who founded a living-materials lab at the university that takes inspiration from nature, told me. "The sky is the limit, really, for creative applications of the technology."

British scientist says it is 'almost a racing certain' that the icy seas on Jupiter's moon Europa are home to alien life that are 'octopus-like creatures'

  British scientist says it is 'almost a racing certain' that the icy seas on Jupiter's moon Europa are home to alien life that are 'octopus-like creatures' Monica Grady, a British space scientist, says it is 'almost a racing certain' that Jupiter's moon Europa is harboring to alien life in its icy seas, but believes they are 'octopus' like creatures.A British space scientist says it is 'almost a racing certain' that Jupiter's moon Europa is home to alien life, but believes they are 'octopus' like creatures.

We could start dumping supplies on the moon in months if we really wanted to. To start sending water and rocket fuel for the journey home, along with That said, the moon is a much more economically feasible location for a colony. A Mars colony will continue to be far off in the future until the funding

Volcanic gases could have spewed water vapor onto the moon ’s surface, the authors wrote, especially given recent evidence that No expedition to the moon has ever found amino acids or other chemicals that might link up to form living things, even as similar chemicals have turned up as far away as Mars .

The living building material arose from Srubar's interest in sustainable building. You can't buy these wonder bricks at your nearby Home Depot yet, but the researchers say they'd ultimately be cheaper to produce, and would remove carbon dioxide from the air rather than emit it.

"Living building materials could be used to improve the efficiency and sustainability of building material production and could allow materials to sense and interact with their environment," Chelsea Heveran, co-lead of a study on the research that came out last week in the journal Matter.

Living bricks could, for example, change color to indicate the presence of dangerous toxins, and potentially suck them up.

To make their bricks, the researchers blended bacteria into a "scaffold" made from gelatin and sand. Under the right light and other conditions, the microbes absorb carbon dioxide to help them grow and make calcium carbonate, the main ingredient in cement.

White House calls for biggest NASA budget in decades to reach the moon, Mars

  White House calls for biggest NASA budget in decades to reach the moon, Mars White House calls for biggest NASA budget in decades to reach the moon, MarsThe request would boost the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's budget by 12 percent for the fiscal year that starts Oct. 1, with nearly half of the funds going toward the "Moon to Mars" programme, which includes development of lunar landers, robotic rovers, heavy-lift rockets and new spacesuits.

Similar materials could be used to build habitats on the Moon or Mars . (Credits: 2018 Stanford-Brown-RISD iGEM Team). The outer-most layer is made up of frozen water ice, perhaps tapped from the resources on the Moon or Mars . That water serves as a protection from radiation and trickles

“ Moon bricks will be made of dust. You can create solid blocks out of it to build roads and launch pads, or habitats that protect your astronauts from the Basically, bases on the Moon , Mars , and other locations in the Solar System will need to be as self -sufficient as possible to reduce reliance on

The scientists can then mold this bacteria-scaffold mix into varying shapes. The team showed they could produce small cubes, bricks the size of shoeboxes and structures that look like fancy sandcastles.

"What is exciting is that while less than 1% of bacteria used in concrete self-sealing applications typically survive, we showed up to orders of magnitude higher survivability of bacteria in our material," Srubar said.

Approximately 9 to 14% of the bacterial colonies were still alive after 30 days and three different generations in brick form, according to the study. Chop one of the bricks in half, and each half is capable of growing into a new brick, it says.

The material is durable, too. The team discovered that under a variety of temperature and humidity conditions, it has about the same strength as mortar used by contractors today.

"You can step on it, and it won't break," Srubar said.

Self-healing materials have become attractive to science in a world increasingly conscious of e-waste.

Last year, scientists in Singapore developed a touch-sensitive, self-healing electronic skin that could be used to make for more realistic human interaction with machines like soft robots. The researchers showed that if the skin got cut or torn, it can stitch itself back together within days.

NASA is even looking into the possibility of self-healing spacesuits.

The work out of University of Colorado Boulder is supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA. Next up, Srubar says, is continuing to optimize the material's formula, and exploring other living organisms that could afford living bricks even more advantages.

"While we are at the beginning stages of this research," he said, "we expect the material will be available commercially within the next five to 10 years."

Scientists solve mystery of space bacteria on the ISS .
When you're living in a remote, isolated environment, things like bacteria and viruses can wreak havoc in a very short period of time. The bacteria that were detected in the water system are similar to those known to cause infections, but only in rare cases. The fear, of course, was that the bacteria may have changed or mutated into strains that were more difficult to deal with, thereby posing a serious threat to the crew. As a new paper published in PLOS ONE explains, that’s not the case.

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