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Tech & Science Coronavirus Can't Keep the World's Climate Satellites Down

01:55  26 march  2020
01:55  26 march  2020 Source:   msn.com

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The coronavirus hasn’ t disrupted missions essential to tracking environmental changes. But the agency’ s 15 satellites currently in orbit gathering climate data continue to operate. About 95% of ESA personnel across Europe are working from home as part of the agency’ s efforts to shield employees

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a screen shot of a computer desk in front of a store: A picture taken on February 7, 2020, shows the main control room of the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) of the European Space Agency (ESA) in Darmstadt, western Germany. © Photographer: YANN SCHREIBER/AFP A picture taken on February 7, 2020, shows the main control room of the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) of the European Space Agency (ESA) in Darmstadt, western Germany.

(Bloomberg) -- Here’s one thing that hasn’t changed because of the coronavirus pandemic: NASA and the European Space Agency keep delivering climate data from satellites, even as mission control headquarters empty and some scientists fall ill.

The millions of data points captured by these satellites feed the scientific models that track and predict the pace of climate change. They’re how we know, for instance, that sea ice is melting, water levels are rising, and forests are disappearing. That scientific evidence serves as the foundation for key environmental policy decisions such as the landmark 2015 Paris Agreement in which countries agreed to cut emissions to keep global warming below 2° Celsius.

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“We have to maintain the data flowing to scientists,” says Simonetta Cheli, head of the strategy, program, and coordination office at ESA’s Earth Observation division. “Gathering the data related to the environment and the state of the Earth and climate change is essential, so guaranteeing that those satellites are up in the air and running is a priority.”

The manufacturing and launch of new satellites are impacted by the situation, as well as some space missions. But the agency’s 15 satellites currently in orbit gathering climate data continue to operate. About 95% of ESA personnel across Europe are working from home as part of the agency’s efforts to shield employees from the novel coronavirus, Cheli says.

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Coronavirus Can ' t Keep the World ' s Climate Satellites Down . “With options traders balanced and investors’ long positions liquidated, big moves down are unlikely,” Redshaw said in its note.

Some people still need to be there, though. Mission managers in Rome feed data requirements into ESA’s mission control center in Darmstadt, Germany. From there, officials control the spacecrafts, including flight dynamics and maneuvers to prevent satellite collision. “There are less people inside, teams are rotating and using smaller rooms to reduce interaction,” Cheli adds.

Working remotely isn’t new for scientists. Most are already used to working with colleagues in different countries and even continents—ESA’s headquarters, for instance, are in Paris, while the hardware center is in the U.K., mission control is in Germany, and mission management in Italy.

“We’re very much used to work remotely on a daily basis, and we use very much the tools that allow us to do that,” Cheli says. “But these days we’re stretching this to the maximum.”

The data satellites gather isn’t used solely for long-term climate change predictions. It has more immediate applications, as well, helping track volcanic activity in Italy and allowing fishermen in the U.K. to check weather conditions before heading out to sea.

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Coronavirus Can ' t Keep the World ' s Climate Satellites Down . Climate -change strategies should focus on innovation, she said, since the fishing industry is close to maximum catch levels. The old adage about there being plenty of fish in the sea isn’t so accurate anymore.

In this video we see new data from the European Space Agency revealing the decline of nitrogen dioxide emissions from 1st of January 2020, particularly in northern parts of Italy, due to the recent lock down to prevent the spread of coronavirus .

Satellite data is helping governments fight the coronavirus outbreak, too. With many European countries implementing border controls to curtail the virus’s spread, traffic has been piling up at checkpoints, so satellite data has become an important tool for authorities to estimate the arrival of necessary food and medical supplies such as surgical masks, coats, and ventilators.

Readings from ESA’s Sentinel-5 Precursor satellite, which detects nitrogen dioxide emissions, also revealed that lockdowns had resulted in a drop in air pollution in northern Italy. “This data is essential to our daily lives, more than we can actually imagine,” Cheli says. “That’s why we have a responsibility to make sure that the operations continue.”  

The situation is similar at NASA in the U.S. Some employees have been diagnosed with the virus and several operations have been suspended, but Earth-observing satellite activity continues. “There has been no interruption of climate-relevant data from these missions,” a NASA spokesperson said by email. A spokesperson from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration echoed the same idea, also by email: “NOAA is prepared—in the event that any of our facilities are affected by Covid-19, we will continue to meet our mission.”

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Given that large parts of the world are shutting down large parts of their economies for weeks if not months, a It’s obvious from satellite -based sensors that the sudden drop-off in industry and transport in some areas If there’s an immediate effect on climate from the world ’ s response to COVID-19, it

As businesses around the world continue to shut down and people increasingly isolate themselves in their homes, these Whether you think it’ s a frightening threat to the modern world or an overhyped disease people will soon forget about, there is no denying coronavirus panic has taken over.

Some research expeditions are being disrupted by the global pandemic. Earlier this month, NASA confirmed that three airborne science campaigns slated to deploy during the spring have been rescheduled for later in the year. The delay of the missions, which study climate change and extreme weather, isn’t expected to impact scientific research, NASA said in a statement.

The MOSAiC expedition in the Arctic canceled all survey flights after the Norwegian government put in place measures to fight the virus. Exploration from three other icebreakers will continue as planned, the Alfred Wegener Institute said in a statement. A crew exchange at the Polarstern icebreaker will also go ahead in April, but AWI is taking extreme precautions which include testing incoming crew members twice before they board and setting up a quarantine ward at the ship.

MOSAiC expedition leader Markus Rex says that for the time being, he and his team will be focused on “finding the safest and most sensible course for the logistical operations at hand,” he says. “No one can predict how that situation will change over the next few months.”

©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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