UK News: Families of Bloody Sunday victims march through Londonderry as 17 British veterans wait to find out today if they will face charges over 1972 shootings - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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UK NewsFamilies of Bloody Sunday victims march through Londonderry as 17 British veterans wait to find out today if they will face charges over 1972 shootings

12:15  14 march  2019
12:15  14 march  2019 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

Boris Johnson defends Bloody Sunday soldiers, - and asks why the IRA 'got away with' Troubles crimes

Boris Johnson defends Bloody Sunday soldiers, - and asks why the IRA 'got away with' Troubles crimes Boris Johnson defends Bloody Sunday soldiers, - and asks why the IRA 'got away with' Troubles crimes

Bloody Sunday , sometimes called the Bogside Massacre, was an incident on 30 January 1972 in the Bogside area of Derry , Northern Ireland

Bloody Sunday paratrooper who faces charges over protestors shot during the Troubles fears that he is being 'hung out to dry' as 17 veterans are set to find out if they will be prosecuted. A former paratrooper facing charges over the Bloody Sunday shootings said he is preparing to be ‘hung out

Families of Bloody Sunday victims march through Londonderry as 17 British veterans wait to find out today if they will face charges over 1972 shootings © Reuters Families of the victims walk through the Bogside before the announcement of the decision whether to charge soldiers involved in the Bloody Sunday events.

Families of those killed on Bloody Sunday gathered in Londonderry today as soldiers involved on the day wait to find out if they are to be prosecuted.

Seventeen former soldiers, who are now in their 60s and 70s, will this morning learn whether they face criminal charges over the killing of 13 civilians in the city in 1972.

Families of Bloody Sunday victims march through Londonderry as 17 British veterans wait to find out today if they will face charges over 1972 shootings © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Families of those killed in the Bloody Sunday violence are marching through Londonderry ahead of an announcement as to whether 17 former British soldiers and two former members of the Official IRA will be prosecuted Former members of the support company of the 1st Battalion Parachute Regiment are facing possible charges of murder, attempted murder and causing grievous injury with intent.

Boris Johnson defends Bloody Sunday soldiers, and asks why the IRA 'got away with' Troubles crimes

Boris Johnson defends Bloody Sunday soldiers, and asks why the IRA 'got away with' Troubles crimes Four ex-British soldiers could be charged with the 1972 shooting of unarmed marchers.

Seventeen former soldiers from a Parachute Regiment will find out on Thursday whether they will be prosecuted in respect of the Bloody Sunday shootings Former paratroopers fear that if charges are brought against Army veterans involved in Bloody Sunday shootings in Londonderry 1972 it will

Bloody Sunday occurred on January 30 1972 in the city of Derry when the parachute regiment of the British army opened fire on a Civil Rights march killing 13 Direct rule from England was brought in after the events of Bloody Sunday and the British Government set-up the Widgery Tribunal to find

But there has been an outcry over the prospect of military veterans being prosecuted for their roles in Northern Ireland during the Troubles.

Many are angry that British troops face court action while IRA fugitives were sent so-called 'comfort letters', assuring them they were no longer being hunted by the police.

Relatives of those killed were today joined by supporters close to the scene of the shootings in Londonderry's Bogside, ahead of a march to a city centre hotel where they will find out if the veterans will face court action.

Families of Bloody Sunday victims march through Londonderry as 17 British veterans wait to find out today if they will face charges over 1972 shootings © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Families of those who died on Bloody Sunday march this morning through the Bogside in Londonderry, Northern Ireland

John Kelly, whose brother Michael was shot dead aged 17, said he was 'hoping and praying' families will get news of prosecutions.

Northern Ireland’s parties split over prosecution of Bloody Sunday soldiers

Northern Ireland’s parties split over prosecution of Bloody Sunday soldiers The Democratic Unionists oppose the prosecution of the soldiers, while Sinn Fein said they should face the courts.

Families of the victims of the Bloody Sunday shootings march from the Bogside area of Families of the victims of Bloody Sunday march to the Guildhall in Derry to read Lord Saville's report into The British public know little about Ireland but I suspect what they think they know is that their boys

Find out below what happened to each victim , what Widgery said and the findings from the In 1972 , he said nothing about firing along a pedestrianised area by the flats, but later admitted doing so. The 17 -year-old had been training to be a sewing machine mechanic and the march was his first taste of

'We're all very anxious, nervous, but at the same time we're sort of fairly confident that we are going to get what we want,' he said.

Families of Bloody Sunday victims march through Londonderry as 17 British veterans wait to find out today if they will face charges over 1972 shootings © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Pictured: The aftermath of the incident. Eighteen former paratroopers were under investigation, but one died last year Meanwhile, the officer who was in charge of British troops on Bloody Sunday has hit out at the possibility that his men will be dragged into court nearly 50 years on.

Lt-Col Derek Wilford, the commander on the day, said today that he and his men feel 'betrayed' and that he is 'very angry' at their treatment by authorities.

Families of Bloody Sunday victims march through Londonderry as 17 British veterans wait to find out today if they will face charges over 1972 shootings © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited The families march together to a city centre hotel today to hear whether charges will be brought against the British soldiers The now-86-year-old told The Daily Telegraph: 'I maintain the fact that there was fire and we were part of it. These people on the barricades were out to kill us. You don't need to be a soldier to realise that's what was happening.

'After 47 years, this is a moment': Anxious wait for families before Bloody Sunday announcement

'After 47 years, this is a moment': Anxious wait for families before Bloody Sunday announcement “Putting a soldier in jail wouldn’t make me happy whatsoever,” Kevin McKinney says, whose father was shot dead in 1972.

A former British soldier has been arrested by detectives investigating the Bloody Sunday shootings in Londonderry in 1972 . Veterans ' outrage as ex-Para is arrested on suspicion of murdering three marchers in Londonderry in 1972 . Man detained in County Antrim by Legacy Investigation Branch

The explosion put the transmitter out of action. The mast had allowed RTE programs to be received over a large part Seven people were injured, and about 250 families evacuated. Bloody Sunday by British Army ( 1972 ). Northern Ireland government dissolved; direct rule from London begins ( 1972 ).

'That is why now I have no sympathy with the other side. My sympathy lies with my soldiers, who day after day were obliged to go out into the wilderness of hostility.'

He said he accepted that what happened was bad and he is sorry for what took place, but does not regret what his soldiers did.

Families of Bloody Sunday victims march through Londonderry as 17 British veterans wait to find out today if they will face charges over 1972 shootings © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited A photo from January 30 1972 shows demonstrators facing off with British soldiers minutes before paratroopers opened fire, killing 13 civilians on what became known as Bloody Sunday British troops had been sent into the Bogside nationalist housing estate to deal with riots which followed a march, held in defiance of a ban on public processions.

As well as the 13 who died, a total of 15 others were shot and injured. One of the injured died months later from an inoperable tumour and some consider him the 14th fatality.

In 2010, an inquiry by Lord Saville found that those killed were innocent and posed no threat. The soldiers claimed they fired in retaliation after coming under attack from IRA gunmen.

Families of Bloody Sunday victims march through Londonderry as 17 British veterans wait to find out today if they will face charges over 1972 shootings © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited British troops search civilians on the day of the Bloody Sunday massacre, January 30, 1972

Anger at 'comfort letters' given to IRA terrorists while British troops face court

The anger of Army veterans over possible prosecutions has been increased by the 'comfort letters' given to IRA terror suspects.

Bloody Sunday: A 'watershed' in the history of the Troubles

Bloody Sunday: A 'watershed' in the history of the Troubles It is etched on the walls of Derry and on the minds of those old enough to remember: 30 January 1972. What began as a civil rights march ended with a day forever labelled Bloody Sunday. Up to 20,000 people were taking part in a protest against the internment of suspects without trial. The 1st Battalion of the Parachute Regiment had been deployed to Londonderry to arrest rioters in the event of civil disorder. © Getty Thirteen people were killed by British soldiers on Bloody Sunday Some of the crowd spotted paratroopers occupying a derelict building and began throwing stones at the windows. At 3.

The Bloody Sunday March is not party-political. Everyone is entitled to their own perspective. We urge people of all persuasions to join with us once again on Sunday , January 27th to signal that we won’t stop campaigning until the families of all who have lost their lives to State violence have truth and

British paratroopers take away civil rights demonstrators on Bloody Sunday after the paratroopers opened fire on a civil rights march “The families of those murdered by British Soldiers on that day in 1972 waited far too long for the truth about what happened, they should not be forced to wait any

The letters were sent out following a scheme set up by Tony Blair's Labour government in the wake of the 1998 Good Friday Agreement.

Families of Bloody Sunday victims march through Londonderry as 17 British veterans wait to find out today if they will face charges over 1972 shootings © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Police began the criminal probe in the wake of the 12-year, £200million inquiry led by Lord Saville, which concluded in 2010. Soldiers are angry that the inquiry, which was set up only to determine what happened, was now being used to mount potential criminal cases They assured 187 Republican terror suspects they were no longer being hunted by the police.

At least 95 recipients were linked to almost 300 murders.

The letters – sent to the so-called 'on the runs' after pressure from Sinn Fein – only came to light during the trial of John Downey, the man accused of the Hyde Park bombing in 1982.

The trial collapsed in February last year when it emerged the 63-year-old had been told he would not face prosecution for the blast that killed four soldiers and seven horses in London.

Soldiers now facing possible prosecution are angry that the inquiry is now being used against them.

One former soldier said: 'We were made to give evidence to the Saville inquiry. We weren't hiding from anyone. But we were told statements given to the inquiry couldn't be used in prosecutions.

'The next thing we know, the Northern Ireland Public Prosecution Service (PPS) are saying they are deciding on prosecutions.

One ex-British soldier to be charged over Bloody Sunday shootings

One ex-British soldier to be charged over Bloody Sunday shootings One former British soldier is to be charged with the murders of two men and the attempted murders of four others over the Bloody Sunday shootings. There was insufficient evidence to provide a reasonable prospect of conviction for the other 16 former soldiers, the Public Prosecution Service said. Families gathered outside The Museum of Free Derry, yards from where the killings took place 47 years ago, and marched together to the city centre to hear the decision.

Bloody Sunday (Irish: Domhnach na Fola) was a day of violence in Dublin on 21 November 1920, during the Irish War of Independence.

Prosecutors are considering charging 18 British soldiers over involvement in the Bloody Sunday Mr Kelly was 23 when 17 -year-old Michael died. He still has a Mars bar his mother had bought for his brother. Earlier this year a pro-military rally was organised by Justice For Northern Ireland Veterans

Families of Bloody Sunday victims march through Londonderry as 17 British veterans wait to find out today if they will face charges over 1972 shootings © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited IRA terror suspect John Downey was sent an immunity letter causing his trial for for the 1982 Hyde Park bombing to collapse 'At the time of the inquiry, families were saying they were not interested in prison sentences for soldiers. Now they are saying they want life sentences.'

Lord Saville, who chaired the investigation into the incident, yesterday insisted its sole purpose was to find out what went on.

Lord Saville told the BBC: 'I didn't know what was likely to happen. We hoped the inquiry would help the situation in Ireland and I think and hope it did to a degree.

'The question as to whether it draws a line under events or whether there should be prosecutions is not one for me, it's one for politicians and prosecuting authorities.

'If people want more and feel that justice can only be served by prosecutions against those that they believe to be responsible, then that is a matter again on which I can't really comment.'

Families of Bloody Sunday victims march through Londonderry as 17 British veterans wait to find out today if they will face charges over 1972 shootings © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited The mural depicting those who lost their lives on Bloody Sunday in Rossville Street Evidence given to the Bloody Sunday inquiry is not admissible in any potential criminal prosecutions under terms agreed when it was launched in 1998.

But soldiers say there would have been no prospect of prosecutions without it.

An investigation by the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) followed the £195 million inquiry and files on 18 soldiers were submitted to prosecutors in 2016 and 2017 for consideration. One former soldier has since died.

Mass shootings in New Zealand: What we know so far

Mass shootings in New Zealand: What we know so far A number of people have died in mass shootings at two mosques full of people attending Friday prayers in New Zealand. Here is what we know so far: :: Two mosques in Christchurch were targeted, with the deadliest shooting unfolding at the Al Noor mosque in the city centre. © Getty The shooting happened on Friday afternoon :: Police say the number of people killed is "significant", but the exact number of victims is unclear. :: Witnesses said the shooting at the Al Noor mosque lasted for 20 minutes, with the gunman going from room to room.

The Bloody Sunday Inquiry, also known as the Saville Inquiry or the Saville Report after its chairman, Lord Saville of Newdigate, was established in 1998 by British Prime Minister Tony Blair after

THE Bloody Sunday massacre in 1972 is remembered as one of the darkest and bloodiest events of The Troubles in Northern Ireland - with the British Army The Bishop of Derry Edward Daly escorting through an injured protester is one of the enduring images of the conflict. What is Bloody Sunday ?

Four other soldiers included in the Saville Report died before police had completed their investigation.

A decision is also due to be taken today by the PPS as to whether to charge two Official IRA suspects present on the day.

Papers before prosecutors included 668 witness statements and numerous photos, video and audio evidence.

Families of Bloody Sunday victims march through Londonderry as 17 British veterans wait to find out today if they will face charges over 1972 shootings © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited A 1998 photograph of Lord Saville of Newdigate chairing the Bloody Sunday inquiry

A timeline of Bloody Sunday and the Troubles in Northern Ireland

August 1969 - British Government first send troops into Northern Ireland to restore order after three days of rioting in Catholic Londonderry.

30 January 1972 - On 'Bloody Sunday' 13 civilians are shot dead by the British Army during a civil rights march in Londonderry.

March 1972 - The Stormont Government is dissolved and direct rule imposed by London.

1970s - The IRA begin its bloody campaign of bombings and assassinations in Britain.

Families of Bloody Sunday victims march through Londonderry as 17 British veterans wait to find out today if they will face charges over 1972 shootings © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited British troops in Northern Ireland during the Troubles which began in the late 1960s and lasted until 1998 with the signing of the Good Friday Agreement

April 1981 - Bobby Sands, a republicans on hunger strike in the Maze prison, is elected to Parliament. He dies a month later.

October 1984 - An IRA bomb explodes at the Grand Hotel in Brighton, where Margaret Thatcher is staying during the Tory Party conference.

Early 1990s - Margaret Thatcher and then Sir John Major set up a secret back channel with the IRA to start peace talks. The communications was so secret most ministers did not know about it.

April 1998 - Tony Blair helps to broker the Good Friday Agreement, which is hailed as the end of the Troubles. It establishes the Northern Ireland Assembly with David Trimble as its first minister.

Families of Bloody Sunday victims march through Londonderry as 17 British veterans wait to find out today if they will face charges over 1972 shootings © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Norman Tebbit, a Conservative cabinet minister at the time, is carried from the wreckage of Brighton's Grand Hotel following the IRA bomb in 1984

2000s - With some exceptions the peace process holds and republican and loyalist paramilitaries decommission their weapons

2010 - The Saville Report exonerates the civilians who were killed on Bloody Sunday leading to a formal apology from then Prime Minister David Cameron to the families.

2019 - Prosecutors announce whether to brig charges against the 17 surviving Paras who fired shots that day.

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