UK News: Drivers face penalty points for not wearing seat belts – here's how the new law works - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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UK NewsDrivers face penalty points for not wearing seat belts – here's how the new law works

18:55  19 july  2019
18:55  19 july  2019 Source:   inews.co.uk

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NOT wearing a seat belt could put points on your licence under tough new rules. The Government has not yet revealed how many points may be given to drivers for failing to buckle up Introducing points for failing to wear a seat belt is one of 74 measures being considered as part of the

Motorists who do not wear seatbelts face penalty points amid concerns over the level of road fatalities. The Department for Transport said it was considering the proposal after the publication of data showing a rise in the proportion of drivers not wearing seatbelts who were killed in accidents.

Drivers face penalty points for not wearing seat belts – here's how the new law works © Provided by Johnston Publishing Ltd

Drivers who are caught not wearing a seat belt are to face being given points on their licence, under new plans to increase penalties for motoring offences.

Motorists in England, Scotland and Wales currently face an on-the-spot fine of £100 if they fail to buckle up while behind the wheel, but the offence will see drivers be landed with penalty points as well.

Drivers face penalty points for not wearing seat belts – here's how the new law works © Provided by Johnston Publishing Ltd

Fines can increase up to £500 if the case goes to court.

Harsher penalties

Drivers can lose their licence if they build up 12 or more points within three years, so the harsher punishment could help to reduce repeat offenders.

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Drivers caught not wearing a seat belt face tougher punishments under Department for Transport The DfT did not reveal how many points may be given to drivers for not wearing a seat belt , but “Today’ s action plan is a key milestone in our road safety work and sets out the important steps we

Drivers caught not wearing a seat belt face tougher punishments under Department for Transport (DfT) plans. Offenders in Britain could be handed penalty The DfT did not reveal how many points may be given to drivers for not wearing a seat belt , but three points are used in Northern Ireland.

The law is different in Northern Ireland, where drivers already risk being given three points if they are caught without a seat belt, and face a fine of up to £500.

The Department for Transport has not yet announced how many points will be given for the offence.

More than a quarter (27 per cent) of the 787 car occupants who died in crashes on Britain's roads in 2017 were not wearing a seat belt, according to DfT figures. This was compared with 20 per cent during the previous year.

New safety measures

The plans to introduce points for failing to wear a seat belt is one of 74 measures included in the government's Road Safety Action Plan.

Transport Secretary Chris Grayling said the action plan is a "key milestone" in the government's road safety work and sets out the steps being taken to reduce the number of people killed and seriously injured on the UK's roads.

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Evidence shows that Ontario' s seatbelt law works and has helped strengthen our leading road safety record. If you are driving , you can face a fine if you or anyone in your vehicle under age 16 is not wearing a seatbelt or secured in a Adjust your speed to match the speed of traffic in the new lane.

Seat belts save lives. To reinforce this fact, the State of Texas will often place digital road signs along busy highways and roads that remind drivers that wearing a seat belt is the law , and show statistics of drivers killed in vehicular accidents on Texas roads. Here are the top five reasons why wearing a

The action plan states, "The vast majority of drivers on our roads drive safely and within the law, but some do not, and there is constant potential for good behaviour to degrade, especially as constraints become familiar and distractions increase."

With the number of car occupant fatalities from not wearing a seat belt rising over the past few years, the government hope the introduction of penalty points on driving licences will help to lower the number.

The report adds the government is also considering the report from the Parliamentary Advisory Council for Transport Safety to help understand which kind of drivers and passengers are least likely to wear seat belts, what prompts their behaviour and which interventions would be best to reduce the number of casualties.

Road Safety Minister Michael Ellis said, "Far too many people are not wearing a seat belt while traveling in a car, needlessly putting their lives at risk.

"Increasing penalties for people who disregard the simplest way of protecting themsleves is just one of a long list of actions this government is taking to help keep people safe on our roads."

The government is also considering fitting alcohol sensors to cars driven by motorists who have been convicted of drinking and driving, which will immobilise the vehicle if they are over the legal limit.

Drivers could soon get penalty points for failing to wear a seatbelt.
Measure is being considered alongside 73 others as part of government safety drive. Harsher penalties for failing to wear a seatbelt are being considered alongside 73 other measures to reduce road deaths, the government has announced. More on the government's plans to improve road safety: Electric cars will have to make noise to improve pedestrian safety Roads policing tactics under review It’s part of the government’s new road safety action plan, which lays out a wide range of potential changes designed to cut casualties.

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