UK News: Compulsory eye tests for drivers over 70 could be introduced - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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UK NewsCompulsory eye tests for drivers over 70 could be introduced

14:51  20 july  2019
14:51  20 july  2019 Source:   scotsman.com

Young drivers could be banned from driving at night

Young drivers could be banned from driving at night Young drivers in England could be banned from driving at night under plans for a graduated licence system. The idea comes after figures showing that a fifth of young drivers are involved in an accident during their first year behind the wheel. As well as not driving at night, restrictions could include a minimum learning period and not driving with passengers under a certain age.

The Association of Optometrists has said that Drivers should have compulsory eye tests every 10 years. However this is not always as simple as it sounds and this is down to the fact that sight changes can be gradual, often people won't realise that their vision has deteriorated over time.

But a more comprehensive eye test from an optician can not only help prevent sight loss, but also improve safety on the roads. RED Driving School is at the forefront of dealing with this issue and has partnered with Vision Express to offer learners and staff free eye tests and discounted vision care

Compulsory eye tests for drivers over 70 are being considered by the UK government to check they are safe to drive.

Compulsory eye tests for drivers over 70 could be introduced © Provided by Johnston Publishing Ltd

The move comes three years after tests were recommended by an expert group.

The call was repeated in the wake of the 97-year-old Duke of Edinburgh crashing into another car in January. Research will be launched into the impact of drivers’ poor vision on road safety and whether it could become an increasing problem.

Currently, drivers just have to complete a form to confirm they are still fit to drive and declare any medical condition when they reach 70, and every three years afterwards.

Government considering banning young drivers from getting behind the wheel at night

Government considering banning young drivers from getting behind the wheel at night The Government is considering a night-time ban on young drivers, under plans to boost safety on the roads. Ministers are considering introducing a graduated licence system for novice drivers in England amid figures showing a fifth are involved in an accident during their first year behind the wheel. Under the scheme, youngsters would face a series of restrictions, including as a minimum learning period, not driving at night and not driving with passengers under a certain age. © Provided by Oath Inc.

Drivers 'should have compulsory eye tests every decade'. Performing the test can be done on any street and only takes "a couple of seconds", said Dr Parry. Drivers over the age of 70 must actively make a declaration every three years that they are fit to drive - but do not actually have to pass a test .

Drivers 'should have compulsory eye tests every decade'. Performing the test can be done on any street and only takes "a couple of seconds", said Dr Parry. Drivers over the age of 70 must actively make a declaration every three years that they are fit to drive - but do not actually have to pass a test .

The Department for Transport’s (DfT) new action plan, The Road Safety Statement 2019 - A Lifetime of Road Safety, stated: “We are minded to consider that there may be a case for mandatory eyesight tests at 70 and at three-year intervals thereafter, to coincide with licence renewal.

“Further research is required to understand the extent to which vision issues pose a risk to road safety for drivers of all ages.

“The fitness required for driving is not just about good eyesight – manoeuvrability and reaction time are also essential. But good eyesight is important.

“We are launching a research programme and literature review to assess how far poor vision is or may itself become a road safety problem in the UK, and if there is a requirement for a new vision test to identify drivers who pose a collision risk.”

Drivers could be hit with penalty points if they fail to wear seat belt

Drivers could be hit with penalty points if they fail to wear seat belt Currently, motorists who do not strap in are handed a £100 on-the-spot fine but no points. The DfT did not reveal how many points may be given to drivers for not wearing a seat belt, but three points are used in Northern Ireland. Motorists can be disqualified from driving if they build up 12 or more points within three years. Prince Philip was spoken to by police in January after being photographed driving without a seat belt. More than a quarter (27%) of the 787 car occupants who died in crashes on Britain’s roads in 2017 were not wearing a seat belt, according to DfT data.

At the beginning of your driving test , as you no doubt remember, you'll have been asked to read a car 'But once every ten years should be a mandatory requirement for drivers . This would be a Time to book that test . Remember that everyone over 60 is eligible for a free NHS eye check every The voucher can be downloaded till Sunday 26 November and is redeemable till 31 December 2017.

Meanwhile, over 3,000 deaths or serious injuries are directly caused by bad eyesight every year on The safety organisation is now calling for drivers to take a compulsory eye test every 10 years in order to Not wearing sunglasses while driving could see you fined £5,000 and charged. Road Test .

A DfT spokesman added: “We want to find out more about how eyesight testing could play a role in reducing the number of fatalities on our roads. A full public consultation would be held before any decision is made.”

The DfT said two people were killed and 198 were injured in 2017 in crashes where poor eyesight was a factor. There were 37 over the past five years.

A total of 4,600 motorists were banned from driving last year because of their eyesight.

David Davies, executive director of the Parliamentary Advisory Council for Transport Safety, said: “The UK government has, for the first time, proposed mandatory eyesight tests at 70 for those renewing their licence.

“Drivers of this age are not, statistically, a high risk driver group and this might be seen as unfair. On the other hand, eye tests are free at that age and most people of 70, presumably, would have an eye test periodically anyway.

Drivers face penalty points if they are caught without a seat belt

Drivers face penalty points if they are caught without a seat belt Drivers caught not wearing a seat belt could be given penalty points as well as a fine under new plans from the Department for Transport (DfT). © Getty The changes are one of the new measures in the government's road safety action plan The tougher punishments mean repeat offenders could end up losing their licence for failing to buckle up. Currently, motorists in England, Scotland and Wales face a £100 fine, but this can increase to £500 if the case goes to court. Drivers in Northern Ireland already risk being given three points if they are found without a seat belt.

Motorists should be given a compulsory eye test every decade to ensure they are fit to be on the road, experts say. It said that the present requirements — a basic eyesight test on the day of the practical test requiring motorists to successfully read a numberplate from 20 metres away, and then potentially

New safety campaign emphasises importance of eye tests for drivers . Sharpen Up – a free interactive e-learning resource developed in partnership with Specsavers – can be used by anyone who works It also wants the government to introduce compulsory eyesight tests for drivers , which is

“Eye tests can also be very useful in detecting wider health conditions, so any benefits would extend well beyond road safety.”

Scottish Government figures showed drivers aged over 70 have the lowest casualty rate compare to other age groups, despite an increasing number of older drivers on the roads.

A total of with 15 per cent of over-80s drove daily in 2016 compared to 12 per cent five years before.

Motoring group IAM RoadSmart said sight checks should start at 75, as recommended by the Older Drivers Task Force in 2016. Neil Greig, its Scotland-based policy and research director, said: “We welcome the commitment to explore new licensing arrangements for older drivers, as numbers are growing every year.

”The crash statistics suggest that most 70-year-olds are actually quite safe compared to other age groups, so we think 75 may be a better age to start considering the need to provide an eye test.

“It is important to get the balance right, as onerous regulation will make many drivers give up too early, and loss of mobility has been linked to mental and physical decline, which costs us all more in the long run.”

Michelle Supple, a director of Age Scotland, said: “If the UK government do pursue compulsory eye tests, this must be communicated clearly, outlining the purpose.”

Drivers stuck for hours on M74 in traffic chaos after crash shuts northbound carriageway.
Huge tailbacks left motorists heading towards Glasgow trapped in a traffic jam north of Abington after a crash at around 4pm.

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