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UK NewsPeterloo Massacre: how a peaceful political protest in Manchester 200 years ago ended with 18 people being killed

20:05  14 august  2019
20:05  14 august  2019 Source:   inews.co.uk

What was the Peterloo Massacre?

What was the Peterloo Massacre? Manchester marks 200th anniversary of slaughter of protesters seeking parliamentary reform

Now, 200 years on from the Peterloo massacre in which peaceful protesters were cut down by sabre-wielding cavalry, a hastily scribbled note has Peterloo and its aftermath confirmed to Taylor that reformers in Manchester needed their own voice. Two years later, and with the financial backing

This article is more than 1 year old. Peterloo massacre : hundreds attend anniversary memorial in Manchester . An estimated 18 people were killed on 16 August 1819 when government troops, plus local The long read: It was to be a grand day out: a peaceful rally to call for political reform.

Peterloo Massacre: how a peaceful political protest in Manchester 200 years ago ended with 18 people being killed © Provided by Johnston Publishing Ltd

Manchester's Peterloo Massacre, on 16 August 1819, began as a peaceful appeal for political reform. Thousands of working families were campaigning to see their growing town more effectively represented in parliament, asking only that the country's lawmakers might consider their hardship.

Peterloo Massacre: how a peaceful political protest in Manchester 200 years ago ended with 18 people being killed © Provided by Johnston Publishing Ltd

Instead, not long after demonstrators had gathered in St Peter's Field in the centre of the city, troops moved in, clearing the square in just 20 minutes. Their brutality left 18 people dead and hundreds more injured.

Peterloo Massacre: how a peaceful political protest in Manchester 200 years ago ended with 18 people being killed © Provided by Johnston Publishing Ltd

Peterloo remains the most violent event to ever occur at a political meeting in Britain. It is also a flagstone moment for working people and their fight for a more fair and just democracy. This year marks its 200th anniversary.

Peterloo massacre anniversary events: The memorials in Manchester and around the UK to mark 200 years since the tragedy

Peterloo massacre anniversary events: The memorials in Manchester and around the UK to mark 200 years since the tragedy Events have been organised to mark this momentous moment in British political history

Eighteen people were killed and 700 injured at the peaceful protest for democratic reform in Manchester in “The plaque that commemorates the massacre in Manchester described it as a ‘dispersal’ until 2007 “But these were peaceful people who were killed – including a two- year -old

The cane was owned by Charles Worsley, who was present at the infamous Peterloo massacre 200 years ago . The walking stick is inscribed with writing and drawings in memory of the atrocity. Some 60,000 people gathered at St Peter's field in Manchester to stage a peaceful protest for reform and

What happened at Peterloo?

On a summer's day on 16 August 1819, a crowd of 60,000-plus protesters travelled to St Peter's Field in Manchester, some from the city, others from neighbouring Lancashire and Cheshire, to appeal for political reform - namely, proper representation for ordinary citizens.

Thousands of working people, including weavers, mill-workers and labourers, many of whom journeyed with their children, gathered to consider “the propriety of adopting the most legal and effectual means of obtaining a reform”.

Soldiers hacked at innocent protesters (Photo: Wiki)

But not long after the meeting had begun, local magistrates called on the Manchester and Salford Yeomanry to arrest the primary speaker and several others who had joined him on the hustings. The militia charged into the crowd and knocked a woman down, killing her baby.

The Anniversary Of Peterloo Is A Timely Reminder That Attempts To Suppress Voters Must Be Resisted

The Anniversary Of Peterloo Is A Timely Reminder That Attempts To Suppress Voters Must Be Resisted Today, marks 200 years since the Peterloo Massacre, a brutal and bloody clash that became a turning point in the history of our democracy and Britain’s long struggle for universal suffrage. The right to vote is a powerful tool, one that is seldom given freely. And, on the morning of 16 August 1819, 60,000 peaceful pro-democracy and anti-poverty protesters marched towards Manchester and gathered at St Peter’s Fields calling for political reform. At that time fewer than two per cent of the population had the vote. Poverty and hunger were rife, and the right to representation was capturing the hearts and minds of large numbers of people.

But who was the man who ordered the Peterloo Massacre ? In a cafe in Sloane Square, the Two hundred years ago , working-class people in Manchester and other industrial towns in the "Do they know about how the ordinary working people came for a peaceful demonstration and were butchered?

Peterloo Massacre , the brutal dispersal by cavalry of a radical meeting held on St. Peter’s Fields in The numbers of killed and wounded were disputed; probably about 500 people were injured and 11 killed . historiography; Peterloo MassacreLearn how historians study primary source documents to

Soon after, the chairman of the Lancashire and Cheshire Magistrates, William Hulton, called on the 15th Hussars to disperse the crowd, but their actions only added to the confusion, and 18 people died. About 400-700 people were injured.

Why the protests?

The early 1800s were a troubled time in Britain. The Napoleonic Wars ended in 1815 and there was widespread unemployment. Periods of famine were only exacerbated by the introduction of the Corn Laws - trade restrictions which effectively controlled the price of bread, leaving many working people hungry.

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Peterloo massacre anniversary events: The memorials in Manchester and around the UK to mark 200 years since the tragedy

Mike Leigh on Peterloo: ‘I’ve only got a certain amount of time left’

There was also the case of rotten boroughs, where privileged parties could secure a seat in parliament with a minuscule vote. On the contrary, all the North West's textile manufacturing towns - such as Blackburn, Bolton, and Rochdale - were represented by just two MPs. Pay was low, and only getting lower.

HSBC Calls for Peaceful Ways to Resolve Hong Kong Issues

HSBC Calls for Peaceful Ways to Resolve Hong Kong Issues HSBC Holdings Plc broke its silence on the protests roiling Hong Kong, calling for a peaceful resolution to differences in the city. While local businesses and tycoons have spoken out about the unrest, HSBC, which derives more than half of its pretax profit from the city, is among the first global banks to publicly address the crisis. “As a company rooted in Hong Kong, we are very concerned about the recent social events and strongly condemn any violence and actions that disrupt social orders,” the London-based bank said in an advertisement in the Chinese-language Hong Kong Economic Times.

It was expected that a new version of the memorial would be formally unveiled on Friday during a public event to mark 200 years since the bloody protest The monument is made up of 11 concentric steps featuring the names of the 18 people who died in the Peterloo massacre and the towns from which

They also lacked political representation. The millions of people who lived in the Lancashire mill towns were Contemporary accounts say that the crowds were peaceful and in good spirits when they The Peterloo Massacre (Famous Protest Documentary) | Timeline - Продолжительность: 1:14:06

In the northern towns, political discontent was boiling over into radicalism by 1819. Suffrage was increasing in popularity: in some cases by way of peaceful reformists; in others, those with angrier sentiments seeking to disrupt the status quo by more aggressive means. Manchester was at the heart of everything.

Amid all this, a "great assembly" was organised by the Manchester Patriotic Union, designed by radicals from the Manchester Observer. The paper's founder, Joseph Johnson, invited Henry Hunt, a privileged gentleman who sympathised with the working people. He agreed to speak.

Feared by the ruling class

William Hulton, the chairman of the magistrates, watched the mass meeting from a building on the edge of St Peter's Field. Upon seeing the enthusiastic reception Hunt received, he ordered soldiers to take action. Hunt was considered a class traitor and a significant danger in furthering the workers' cause thanks to his social standing.

The cavalry charge left as many as 18 dead, though this figure is not known for sure. Some victims were sabered, others shot, while many were trampled on by horses and/or the panicking crowds.

The largest protests in history

The largest protests in history Hong Kong’s anti-government demonstrations are among the largest ever seen

Two hundred years ago , working-class people in Manchester and other industrial towns in the At least 11 people were killed and 400 injured. The events soon became notorious in the press, where "Do they know about how the ordinary working people came for a peaceful demonstration and were

The sun shone down from a cloudless sky on the morning of 16 August 1819 – the darkest day in British political history. It was still shining when, later that day, government troops charged into a crowd of 60,000 peaceful

People wanted proper MPs (Photo: Wiki)

Confusion began when the Yeomanry, a volunteer force made up of factory owners and the landed gentry, were tasked with arresting Hunt and his associates. They charged when workers allegedly linked arms to stop the arrests.

In the panic, the Hussars were ordered in, and while some tried to prevent killings, even going so far as to challenge members of the Yeomanry, others became embroiled in violence. Some of the crowds are said to have fought back and become violent themselves, but accounts are patchy.

Aftermath

The Peterloo Massacre is believed to a defining moment of its age. While many of the ruling classes feared an uprising - and, more so, a British French Revolution - local masters, factory owners and employers were horrified by the carnage.

One of the casualties, an injured cloth worker from Oldham called John Lees, had been a soldier at the Battle of Waterloo. Before dying of his wounds on 9 September, he said of the massacre: "At Waterloo there was man to man but there it was downright murder."

Several journalists were present, including John Thacker Saxton, managing editor of the Manchester Observer, John Tyas of The Times, John Smith from the Liverpool Mercury, and Edward Baines Jr, the son of the editor of the Leeds Mercury. James Wroe, editor of the Manchester Observer, was the first to describe the incident as the "Peterloo Massacre", but all wrote of what happened.

When news of Peterloo spread, many were left outraged. Ignoring a collective grief, the Government's immediate response was to crack down on reform. But the massacre sparked more meetings and uprisings. The Great Reform Act, which introduced numerous democratic changes to Britain's electoral system, was passed in 1832.

Mother who served soldiers tea and sandwiches shot dead by Army months later.
Some of the soldiers gifted her with a present when the first Regiment stationed in Ballymurphy left Belfast. Her daughter, Briege Voyle, has fond memories of the Army being in her home as the Troubles flared across Northern Ireland. “After the Troubles started, the Army came into our estate (Ballymurphy) and we thought this was great, that they were our friends,” she said. “My mummy and our neighbour made them tea and sandwiches. They used to come every night and sit and have a yarn with us and we thought nothing of it, that they were here to protect us and it was great fun.

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