UK News: Boris Johnson 'agreed plan to suspend Parliament two weeks BEFORE Downing Street denied it was under consideration' according to bombshell Brexit court documents - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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UK NewsBoris Johnson 'agreed plan to suspend Parliament two weeks BEFORE Downing Street denied it was under consideration' according to bombshell Brexit court documents

18:00  03 september  2019
18:00  03 september  2019 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

Brexit: Edinburgh Court of Session motion filed in bid to prevent suspension of UK Parliament

Brexit: Edinburgh Court of Session motion filed in bid to prevent suspension of UK Parliament A legal bid has been launched to prevent Prime Minister Boris Johnson from suspending Parliament. © Provided by Johnston Publishing Ltd Campaigners against Brexit branded the PM's plans an "assault on democracy" as they revealed a motion has been submitted to the Court of Session in Edinburgh - the highest civil court in Scotland - asking for the move to be suspended. READ MORE: Brexit: Emergency legal bid to stop Boris Johnson suspending Parliament The case is being taken by a cross-party group of more than 70 MPs and peers, with the support of the Good Law Project.

Just nine days ago, Downing Street strongly denied any intention to shut down parliament - but disclosure to Scottish court shows otherwise. It was revealed in Edinburgh's Court of Session, which is hearing a legal challenge to stop parliament being shut down for five weeks , preventing MPs

Under the Fixed Terms Parliament Act, Mr Johnson would require the backing of two -thirds of the Meanwhile, in Edinburgh, a judge is due to hear arguments over the prime minister's plan to shut The prime minister wants to suspend Parliament for five weeks ahead of a Queen's Speech on 14

Boris Johnson agreed a plan in the middle of August to suspend Parliament, two weeks before Downing Street denied the proposal was under consideration, explosive court documents suggest.

A group of 75 MPs and peers has challenged Mr Johnson's decision to prorogue Parliament for five weeks in September and October in the Court of Session in Scotland.

Documents disclosed as part of that case today appear to show that the Prime Minister and his most senior aides were discussing a plan to send MPs home almost three weeks ago.

A note apparently seen by Mr Johnson and his most senior adviser Dominic Cummings and dated August 15 asked whether the PM wanted to consider prorogation.

Brexit: Thousands take to streets to protest plan to suspend Parliament

Brexit: Thousands take to streets to protest plan to suspend Parliament Thousands of people have protested against plans to suspend Parliament in rallies in London, Edinburgh and other cities within hours of Boris Johnson announcing the plan. © Provided by Johnston Publishing Ltd At Westminster, crowds blocked traffic and some staged a sit-down protest in Parliament Square chanting "stop the coup" while others headed for Downing Street. There were also impromptu demonstrations planned in Edinburgh, Cardiff, Manchester, Bristol, Cambridge and Durham after the Queen approved an order that will see Parliament suspended for more than a month.

Downing Street on Tuesday denied claims that Johnson ’s strategist, Dominic Cummings A similar approach by Theresa May failed, as the EU insisted on a guaranteed fallback plan to manage the Irish border. “This is a government that seems to be extremely comfortable with no deal,” one official said.

Boris Johnson will suspend Parliament between September 9 and October 14 (Image: GETTY). It was widely agreed by opposition MPs that the next seven But explosive claims say Mr Johnson secretly agreed to suspend parliament in mid-August, two weeks before denying the plan existed.

The word 'yes' was written on the document, Scotland's highest civil court heard today.

Meanwhile, Mr Johnson later replied to the note by saying suspending Parliament should not be 'shocking'.

The revelations will pile pressure on Downing Street to clarify exactly when the PM first discussed and agreed plans to suspend Parliament.

The Observer newspaper reported on August 25 that a prorogation plan was being considered by Number 10.

But Downing Street hit back hard and said that was 'entirely false' before Mr Johnson then made his bombshell announcement on August 28.

Pro-EU campaigners responded to the emergence of the documents by claiming that Mr Johnson had treated 'parliamentary democracy with contempt and the people of Britain with utter disdain'.

Protesters gather outside Parliament after PM’s move to suspend it

Protesters gather outside Parliament after PM’s move to suspend it At Westminster, crowds blocked traffic and some staged a sit-down protest in Parliament Square, while others headed for Downing Street. There were also impromptu demonstrations planned in Edinburgh, Cardiff, Manchester, Bristol, Cambridge and Durham after the Queen approved an order that will see Parliament suspended for more than a month. Shadow home secretary Diane Abbott told protesters outside Parliament: “At the end of the day, it doesn’t exactly matter where you stand on Brexit, it matters where you stand on Tory prime ministers closing Parliament because they don’t want to give people a say.

Brexit took yet another chaotic turn Wednesday when a controversial request from British Prime Minister Boris Johnson to suspend UK Parliament from A group later moved to the gates of Downing Street , blocking off Parliament Square on their way and were heard shouting: " Boris is a

A bullish Boris Johnson has sought to reassure Tory MPs queasy about his plan to suspend Downing Street is gearing up to resist efforts by MPs, lawyers and campaigners to frustrate his It is unclear how Johnson would respond if an anti-no-deal bill is passed mandating him to extend article

Boris Johnson 'agreed plan to suspend Parliament two weeks BEFORE Downing Street denied it was under consideration' according to bombshell Brexit court documents © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Boris Johnson, pictured outside Downing Street yesterday, appeared to agree to pursue a plan to suspend Parliament in mid-August according to documents disclosed during a court case today Boris Johnson 'agreed plan to suspend Parliament two weeks BEFORE Downing Street denied it was under consideration' according to bombshell Brexit court documents © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited A group of MPs and peers launched a legal action in the Court of Session in Scotland to try to overturn Mr Johnson's plan to suspend Parliament. Judge Lord Doherty, pictured during the hearing today, is weighing up the legal arguments for and against prorogation

According to the documents disclosed during the court case, a note dated August 15 from Nikki da Costa, the PM's director of legislative affairs, asked whether an approach should be made to prorogue Parliament.

The dates suggested were between September 9 and October 14.

The note was apparently seen by Mr Johnson and Mr Cummings and 'yes' was subsequently written on it.

Momentum activist calls on supporters to march on Buckingham Palace and 'protest the Queen'

Momentum activist calls on supporters to march on Buckingham Palace and 'protest the Queen' A Momentum activist has called for anti-Brexit campaigners to march on Buckingham Palace to “protest the Queen”. Michael Chessum called for mass action afterthe Queenthis week granted Prime Minister Boris Johnsonpermission to prorogue Parliament for five weeks. Mr Chessum, who has organised a series of anti-Brexit rallies for the far-left group in the past, said he wanted to encourage “civil disobedience” to stop the suspension of Parliament. "These protests will be unpredictable,” he told the Times, “We will organise the rallies but then what people do is anybody’s guess. © Provided by Oath Inc.

Parliament is usually prorogued for between one and two weeks ahead of a Queen's speech, meaning MPs would in effect be unavailable to stop a no-deal Brexit immediately before October 31. Mr Johnson 's campaign confirmed it was one option being looked at but stressed no decision has yet

Thousands of protesters have taken to the streets of London to demonstrate against Prime Minister Boris Johnson ’s decision to suspend Parliament until two weeks before Brexit zero-hour. Chanting “shame on you, Boris Johnson ,” anti- Brexit activists congregated outside 10 Downing Street .

Mr Johnson then replied the following day with a handwritten note describing the September session of Parliament as a 'rigmarole' designed to show MPs were 'earning their crust'.

He added it should not be 'shocking' to suspend Parliament.

Mr Johnson's agreed plan to prorogue Parliament will see MPs sent home at some point in the week beginning September 9 and returning for a new Queen's Speech on October 14.

What appeared to be the basis of the PM's plan was reported by the Observer on August 25.

Downing Street responded to that story by reportedly stating: 'The claim that the government is considering proroguing Parliament in September in order to stop MPs debating Brexit is entirely false.'

The Queen met the Privy Council on August 28 to approve the PM's plan which prompted a firestorm of political criticism as Mr Johnson was accused of behaving like a 'tin pot dictator'.

Number 10 and Mr Johnson have insisted that the prorogation has been motivated by a need for the government to set out a new domestic legislative agenda.

But critics say it is motivated purely by a desire to sideline MPs in the run up to the October 31 Brexit deadline.

Crowds gather in UK cities to protest Johnson's Brexit plans

Crowds gather in UK cities to protest Johnson's Brexit plans LONDON (AP) — Crowds are gathering in London and other major British cities to protest Prime Minister Boris Johnson's suspension of Parliament for part of the period before the Brexit deadline in two months. Several thousand protesters gathered near Johnson's residence at 10 Downing Street in central London, while others protested in in Belfast, York and others cities to show determination to block a "no deal" Brexit. The crowds were galvanized

Boris Johnson could send MPs home for up to two weeks in October under plans being considered by his campaign. Image: A Johnson campaign source told Sky News the idea was ' under consideration '. Mr Johnson 's campaign confirmed it was one option being looked at but stressed no

Boris Johnson arguing for Brexit in 2016. Britain’s weekly net contribution to the European Union in April 2016 was about £190 million a week , according to the Office for National Statistics. But he has denied wrongdoing, and his lawyers have argued that the case is a political stunt by opponents of

The government is facing a number of legal challenges as MPs, peers and campaigners try to stop the suspension from going ahead.

A decision was made to bring a full hearing in the Court of Session case forward to Tuesday from this Friday after the judge ruled it would be 'in the interest of justice that it proceeds sooner rather than later'.

If an interim interdict had been granted when the case was initially heard last week it would have immediately lifted the royal order to suspend Parliament.

A full interdict could still be granted by the judge.

Ian Murray, a Labour MP, supporter of a People’s Vote and a petitioner in the case, said: 'The revelations in the Court of Session this morning show Boris Johnson treats parliamentary democracy with contempt and the people of Britain with utter disdain.

'First, he dismissed any notion of parliamentary accountability as a "rigmarole" and mocked the public’s concerns. Then he went out and lied about his intentions.

'These are the words and actions of a supremely arrogant, privileged and out-of-touch politician who cannot be trusted to be honest about his intentions in politics or anything else.'

Boris Johnson 'agreed plan to suspend Parliament two weeks BEFORE Downing Street denied it was under consideration' according to bombshell Brexit court documents © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Gina Miller, pictured in Westminster on August 29, is pursuing a seperate legal challenge in the High Court over Mr Johnson's prorogation plan

Meanwhile, there were also developments in a separate legal challenge today as Sir John Major and three other parties were given the go-ahead to join anti-Brexit campaigner Gina Miller's action over the decision to suspend Parliament.

London court rejects challenge to PM Johnson's suspension of parliament

London court rejects challenge to PM Johnson's suspension of parliament London court rejects challenge to PM Johnson's suspension of parliament before Brexit, but said it could be taken to the Supreme Court for an appeal, the BBC said. Johnson announced at the end of August that he would suspend parliament from mid-September to mid-October, just before Britain is due to leave the European Union on Oct. 31, so the government could announce a new legislative programme. That prompted campaigner Gina Miller, who defeated the government over another Brexit issue two years ago, to challenge the order.

For much of August the plan to shut down parliament for five weeks was kept a very tight secret at the It was clear to that small group that the bombshell idea had been hatched by Boris Johnson ’s closest She served under Theresa May for a time advising on parliamentary issues. As well being a

Parliament suspended : The Queen approved Boris Johnson 's request to "prorogue," or suspend , Parliament just days after it returns from summer recess next week , limiting time for lawmakers to stop a no-deal Brexit . Why this is happening: Johnson is seeking to suspend Parliament so his

The High Court, which will hear Ms Miller's judicial review on Thursday, has granted permission to Sir John to intervene in the case in writing.

Judges will decide later whether Sir John's lawyers can make submissions at the hearing.

Scottish Lord Advocate James Wolffe QC, who is Scotland's senior law officer, the Welsh Government and shadow attorney general Shami Chakrabarti have also been given permission to intervene in writing.

A spokeswoman for the judiciary said: 'The court has given permission for Sir John Major to intervene in writing in the judicial review brought by Gina Miller with the Prime Minister as defendant.

'The court will consider in due course Sir John's application for permission for his counsel to make oral submissions at the hearing.

'Three other applications to intervene in writing on behalf of the Scottish Lord Advocate, the Welsh Government and Shami Chakrabarti have been granted.'

Read more

Queen dragged into 'unlawful' shutdown of Parliament as Boris Johnson resists demands to recall MPs.
Sir Keir Starmer, the shadow Brexit Secretary, called on MPs to return to Westminster so they can 'open those doors' and hold PM to account

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