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UK NewsTechnology such as facial recognition risks turning Britain into 'ghastly Orwellian' police state and alienating the public says Britain's most senior officer

10:50  04 september  2019
10:50  04 september  2019 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

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Technology such as facial recognition risks turning Britain into ' ghastly Orwellian ' police state and alienating the public says Britain ' s most senior The Met now has 22,000 officers who use technology like body-worn cameras and carry computer tablets which can access European criminal

Britain risks sleepwalking into a " ghastly , Orwellian , omniscient police state ” unless it addresses the ethical dilemmas posed by new technologies such as facial Ms Dick, who joined the Met as a police constable 36-years ago, said the growth in the use of technology by crime fighters during that

Facial recognition cameras and other technology risk turning Britain into a 'ghastly Orwellian' police state, Britain's most senior police officer warned.

Metropolitan Police chief Cressida Dick said new tactics such as live facial recognition must take place within ethical boundaries to avoid 'omniscient' policing.

Police must 'grasp these ethical nettles' or face a decline in public trust, the Commissioner said.

The use of live facial recognition, which Miss Dick described as a 'hot potato', by South Wales Police is currently being challenged in court.

Elizabeth Denham, the information commissioner, has also launched an investigation into its use at the 67-acre King's Cross development, around the north London train station.

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Britain into ' ghastly Orwellian ' police state and alienating the public says Britain ' s most Metropolitan Police chief Cressida Dick said new tactics such as live facial recognition must be used within ethical boundaries to avoid 'omniscient' policing to avoid Britain becoming a police state .

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Technology such as facial recognition risks turning Britain into 'ghastly Orwellian' police state and alienating the public says Britain's most senior officer © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick leaving 10 Downing Street earlier this month Technology such as facial recognition risks turning Britain into 'ghastly Orwellian' police state and alienating the public says Britain's most senior officer © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited An Avigilon CCTV camera on a wall in King's Cross this month during a trial of the controversial software by the Met Police

'There are such fiendish ethical challenges in some of the new technologies and we have to grasp these ethical nettles,' Miss Dick told the Lowy Institute think-tank in Sydney, Australia.

'We're now tiptoeing into the world of robotics, of machine learning, of AI. We're only tiptoeing and of course some of our adversaries are taking giant steps.

'They are not hindered in the same way, quite properly, that we are constrained.'

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Technology such as facial recognition risks turning Britain into ' ghastly Orwellian ' police state and alienating the public says Britain ' s most Elizabeth Denham, the information commissioner, has also launched an investigation into its use at the 67-acre King's Cross development, around the

Start studying POS Chapter 4. Learn vocabulary, terms and more with flashcards, games and Which of the following is most likely to be the state ' s most valuable agent for political socialization? a) Who observed that political leaders must sometimes engage in evil actions in order to preserve the state ?

The public is now concerned about the role of 'predictive policing' and the potential for bias in technologies like facial recognition, she said.

Upholding principles is important to 'maintain public trust, make best use of technologies and not sleep walk into some kind of ghastly, Orwellian, omniscient police state', she said.

Miss Dick joined the Met in 1983 and was appointed the force's first female commissioner in 2017.

'In 1983 I had access to criminal records and fingerprints which were kept on a microfiche system... intelligence, such as it was, was collated on index cards,' she added.

Technology such as facial recognition risks turning Britain into 'ghastly Orwellian' police state and alienating the public says Britain's most senior officer © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited The Information Commissioner's Office announced it would launch its own investigation into the use of facial recognition cameras after it was revealed scanners were being used in the King's Cross area of London

'DNA as a tool for criminal investigation hadn't been thought of when I started. If you had a serious crime scene and you wanted to take an image of it, you had to call for a photographer.'

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Throughout its Imperial history, Britain was a constitutional parliamentary monarchy and on its last phases, a democracy. Constitutional regimes mean that rule of law has superceded the rule of man - the law and order is above the regent’ s or tyrant’ s whims or any religious laws and customs.

Crime happens 'faster' and the 'relevant times' for police to act have reduced, she said.

'Like the time it takes for someone to be groomed or radicalised, the time for a conspiracy to be created, for enablers like money or component parts for an IED [improvised explosive device] to be accessed.

'The time for a tiff to turn into an argument - something we are seeing a lot in our street violence, our serious violence - now can turn not just into an argument but a fight and a murder.'

The Met now has 22,000 officers who use technology like body-worn cameras and carry computer tablets which can access European criminal databases.

Technology such as facial recognition risks turning Britain into 'ghastly Orwellian' police state and alienating the public says Britain's most senior officer © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited CCTV cameras using facial-recognition systems at King's Cross are to be investigated by the UK's data-protection watchdog after a report by the Financial Times

Detectives can scour social media for clues, while criminals can use the same channels for grooming and radicalisation.

Miss Dick added: 'The biggest risk to public trust lies in the next decade for the Met, and maybe elsewhere, from the possibilities of data and the ethical challenges therein.

'One huge and obvious risk is that we don't actually grasp the possibilities, sitting on our hands and become increasingly ineffective and inefficient.'

A no-deal Brexit could also change the tools police currently use, including the European arrest warrant, she said.

'We currently have access to some data, systems that in the absence of a deal... we won't [have], so we have been looking at what alternative arrangements there may be, what risk appetite we would have for dealing with things in a different way.'

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