UK News: Boris Johnson 'unlawfully' prorogued parliament - what does it mean and what happens next? - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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UK NewsBoris Johnson 'unlawfully' prorogued parliament - what does it mean and what happens next?

17:40  11 september  2019
17:40  11 september  2019 Source:   newsletter.co.uk

Boris Johnson berated live on Facebook over 'unlawful' prorogation advice given to Queen

Boris Johnson berated live on Facebook over 'unlawful' prorogation advice given to Queen Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, was berated live on Facebook on Wednesday evening by people angry with him after a Scottish court said the advice Mr. Johnson provided to the Queen over the decision to prorogue parliament was "unlawful".

But what exactly does proroguing Parliament mean , can Boris Johnson actually do it , and why does he want to? What does proroguing Parliament mean ? Parliament is suspended for times throughout the year anyway - like the summer What happens when Parliament is prorogued ?

Boris Johnson has failed in his second attempt to hold an early general election, capping another day of high The Prime Minister told the Commons he wanted to head to the polls next month to break the political deadlock What does it mean to prorogue Parliament , and what is the impact on Brexit?

Boris Johnson 'unlawfully' prorogued parliament - what does it mean and what happens next? © Provided by Johnston Publishing Ltd

What actually happened?

A group of M.P.s argued in court last week that the decision taken by Prime Minister Boris Johnson to prorogue parliament for five weeks was unlawful.

Judge Lord Doherty ruled that Prime Minister Johnson had acted lawfully in suspending parliament.

However, the group of M.P.s appealed the decision and on Wednesday morning three Scottish judges in the Court of Session overturned Lord Doherty's ruling.

The three judges ruled that the advice given on the proroguing of parliament by the British government to the Queen was "unlawful".

What happens now?

Scottish court rules Boris Johnson illegally suspended Parliament. U.K.'s top court will have the final say.

Scottish court rules Boris Johnson illegally suspended Parliament. U.K.'s top court will have the final say. A Scottish appeals court, the Court of Sessions, ruled Thursday that Prime Minister Boris Johnson violated Britain's constitution when he prorogued, or suspended, Parliament until Oct. 14. The three-judge panel, led by Lord Carloway, Scotland's senior-most judge, overturns a lower court ruling that courts can't interfere with political decision by the prime minister. But the appellate court did not immediately overturn Johnson's order, allowing the U.K. Supreme Court to make the final decision in an emergency session called for Sept. 17. It did, however, inject more chaos into an already madcap Brexit fight.

UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson has thrown down the gauntlet to MPs by asking for Parliament 's prorogation. So how does it work? Parliament is normally suspended — or prorogued — for a short period before the next session begins. This is formally carried out by the queen, who acts on the

Boris Johnson , the UK prime minister, is to suspend parliament for several weeks in the run up to Brexit day on October 31. Johnson argues that suspending (or proroguing ) parliament is necessary to prepare for a new parliamentary session.

The British government reacted to the ruling describing it as "disappointing".

The government confirmed its intention to appeal the decision at the U.K. Supreme Court in London on Tuesday September 17, 2019 - the appeal hearing will last three days with a ruling expected towards the end of next week.

Can M.P.s now return to parliament?

Parliament was officially prorogued for five weeks on Monday and despite the three judges ruling it "unlawful" it is highly unlikely that M.P.s will be able to take their seats in the House of Commons until the British government complete their appeal of the ruling next week.

The three judges ruled that the Prime Minister's decision to suspend parliament was "unlawful" but they did not issue an injunction which would have compelled the British government to reconvene parliament.

Queen dragged into 'unlawful' shutdown of Parliament as Boris Johnson resists demands to recall MPs

Queen dragged into 'unlawful' shutdown of Parliament as Boris Johnson resists demands to recall MPs Sir Keir Starmer, the shadow Brexit Secretary, called on MPs to return to Westminster so they can 'open those doors' and hold PM to account

Parliament will be suspended just days after MPs return to work in September, after the Queen agreed to a request from Prime Minister Boris Johnson . It means MPs will have less time to pass laws that could stop the UK leaving the European Union without a In response to Mr Johnson 's decision to prorogue , the former Conservative Prime Minister Sir What happens to your body in extreme heat?

The prime minister announced plans to shut down parliament for five weeks this autumn to thwart efforts to stymie his Brexit strategy. And what does it mean for legislative efforts to avoid a no-deal Brexit? Presented by Sebastian Payne. With George Parker, Robert Shrimsley and James Blitz of the

What happens if the U.K. Supreme Court in London uphold the ruling made by the three judges in Scotland?

This would mean the prorogation of parliament would be null and void and the court would be able to instruct Prime Minister Boris Johnson to reconvene parliament immediately.

The process of reconvening parliament can only be exercised by Boris Johnson and his government.

What happens if the U.K. Supreme Court in London overturn the ruling made by the three judges in Scotland?

This is precisely what the British government will be working towards as it would mean they could maintain the decision to prorogue parliament and M.P.s would not be able to take their seats in the House of Commons until October 14, 2019.

Adding to Brexit chaos, Scottish court rules parliament suspension ‘unlawful’.
A Scottish court ruled on Wednesday that Prime Minister Boris Johnson's suspension of parliament was unlawful, prompting immediate calls for lawmakers to return to work as the executive and legislative battle over the future of Brexit. Scotland's highest court of appeal ruled that Johnson's decision to prorogue, or suspend, parliament from Monday until Oct. 14 was unlawful – a blow for the government as it seeks to leave the European Union on Oct. 31 with or without a deal.

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