UK News: Everything you need to know about climate change: How the world is changing and the most up-to-date forecasts - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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UK NewsEverything you need to know about climate change: How the world is changing and the most up-to-date forecasts

12:45  16 september  2019
12:45  16 september  2019 Source:   inews.co.uk

New "Beast from the East" could cause one of the coldest winters in three decades

New The UK could be set to experience one of the coldest winters in three decades, scientists have warned. Meteorologists say an even more extreme version of the“Beast from the East”could see parts of the country hit with blizzard-like conditions throughout much of January and February next year. Using ground-breaking analysis of sea temperatures and air pressures, scientists have been able to predict one of the longest-range UK weather forecasts ever recorded - according toThe Sunday Times.

Petrol pump labels have changed - everything you need to know . As climate change asserts itself, the world is starting to take notice, however. And next Monday world leaders will meet for a UN climate action summit in New York to discuss how to step up their targets to reduce carbon

Limiting emissions could also have benefits beyond slowing climate change : A study released this week by And although the NRDC predicts that full implementation of the most rigorous version of the rules could “ Every big country needs to know that every other big country is in the game,” he said.

Everything you need to know about climate change: How the world is changing and the most up-to-date forecasts © Provided by Johnston Publishing Ltd

With the cool of autumn now upon us and the familiar chill of a British winter not far away, this might not sound like a bad prospect right now: within just three decades London will have the climate that Barcelona has now, while Edinburgh will be like Paris.

That scientific forecast of siesta summers seemed extraordinary when it made headlines earlier this year. But with evidence that climate change is already upon us piling ever higher, we shouldn't be surprised by predictions like this. The alarm bells have been ringing louder than ever in 2019.

Everything you need to know about climate change: How the world is changing and the most up-to-date forecasts © Provided by Johnston Publishing Ltd

The UK recorded its hottest ever temperature, of 38.7C, in July, at London's Kew Gardens. This came just five months after the same spot experienced a record high winter temperature of 21.2C.

UK says it has been nominated to host 2020 climate summit

UK says it has been nominated to host 2020 climate summit UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The United Kingdom says it has received international backing to jointly host a major U.N. climate summit in late 2020 with Italy. Britain's U.N. Mission said Tuesday that the summit will take place in Glasgow, Scotland, and that Italy will host the pre-summit meeting, if the nomination by an international selection committee is approved as expected at December's climate summit in Chile. British Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab welcomed the "huge vote of confidence from our international partners," saying "over 30,000 delegates from around the world will come together to commit to ambitious action to tackle climate change.

Climate change is not merely the long-term forecast . It is already here, and it is likely to get significantly worse by the end of this century. Given that half of the world 's population lives within 100 kilometers of a coastline—including most of the world 's megacities—sea level rise could prove

How long have we known about climate change ? We’ve had the bones of a theory for That ’s all important — our individual actions add up — but a lot of what we need to do on climate change Climate change is more a matter of mitigating losses than simply winning a fight. And that ’s part of

Those thermometer readings are part of a warming trend that has seen every one of the country's 10 hottest years occurring since 2002, according to Met Office records dating back to 1884.

Floods getting worse

Everything you need to know about climate change: How the world is changing and the most up-to-date forecasts © Provided by Johnston Publishing Ltd

Climate change is also affecting floods in the UK, with a study published in the journal Nature last month finding that floods in northern England and southern Scotland are 55 per cent bigger, on average, than they were five decades ago. This is due to the increased rainfall levels, as a warmer atmosphere holds more water - with UK summer rainfall now 13 per cent higher than it was last century.

Everything you need to know about climate change: How the world is changing and the most up-to-date forecasts © Provided by Johnston Publishing Ltd

The rise in extreme weather seen in the UK is also being experienced worldwide, often in far more pronounced and dangerous ways.

Climate strike: where the 20 September global school protest is taking place around the UK, and what it's all about

Climate strike: where the 20 September global school protest is taking place around the UK, and what it's all about Around 1.4 million students took to the streets across the world back in April to urge governments to act on climate change

We know that climate change is happening – but there are plenty of In a new report published in September 2018, the world ’s leading climate scientists made their starkest warning so far It’s settled science that climate change is real, and we’re starting to see some of the ways that it affects us.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change suggests that the world has already put into the atmosphere about half the carbon it can to avoid more than 2 degrees Celsius of global warming, and time is running out. Already, global average temperatures are up nearly 1 degree C and atmospheric

Everything you need to know about climate change: How the world is changing and the most up-to-date forecasts © Provided by Johnston Publishing Ltd

Globally, the average temperature has already increased by 1C since the industrial revolution, with most of the warming occurring since 1976. The Earth's four hottest years on record have all occurred in the last four years.

The underlying temperature rise and associated fallout from climate change has made powerful heatwaves such as those seen in the UK and Europe this summer 30 times more likely than they were before - and in every case, they are more intense than they would have been without climate change.

Ice melting faster than expected

Everything you need to know about climate change: How the world is changing and the most up-to-date forecasts © Provided by Johnston Publishing Ltd

Melting ice sheets could have catastrophic consequences for humanity (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Ice is melting in Greenland far more rapidly than previously forecast, and the Bahamas and Mozambigue have been devastated by unusually strong storms this year - events made more likely, and more severe, by the impact of our carbon emissions.

EU sees US being swayed by its climate change 'example'

EU sees US being swayed by its climate change 'example' Europe believes the United States will end up following its lead in fighting climate change once it sees the economic benefits that carbon-cutting can bring, EU officials said Wednesday. This incentive will be stressed at a UN Climate Change Summit two weeks from now at the United Nations in New York, when parties to the 2015 Paris climate agreement will talk up its implementation despite Washington's withdrawal from the pact under President Donald Trump A special message from MSN: Now is the time to take urgent action to protect our planet.

Rex Tillerson, Exxon Mobil, and climate change probes — and how Texas is involved. Exxon has repeatedly denied any wrongdoing. “This is a preposterous, illogical thesis that we somehow knew all there was to know about science before it was developed and before the rest of the world ’s experts

If questioning the orthodoxy of Climate Change will get a man fired, than the insidious, indirect effects of If you ’ve been paying more than a modicum of attention to Climate Science, however, you ’ll know that this Useless people doing useless work. I support actual environmental initiatives as much as the next person Feedly provides an up - to - date feed of new content from all the websites you follow

"It is overwhelming and abundantly clear that climate change is caused by humans and it is already happening," said Professor Thomas Crowther, of ETH Zurich university.

"We are already witnessing an increase in mean temperatures around the globe, which is drastically increasing the frequency and intensity of extreme events from droughts to floods to fires. None of them on their own are indication of climate change but in combination they are," he said.

'It is overwhelming and abundantly clear that climate change is caused by humans and it is already happening'

Thomas Crowther

"Getting a handle on climate change is going to require massive societal action across every single possible avenue. It's way to big to focus on one solution on another."

The United Nations warned in May that as many as one million species are at risk of extinction in large part due to climate change.

A University of Bristol study released the same month warned that global temperatures could increase by as much as 5C by the end of the century unless emissions were brought under control.

Sweden's Tallest Peak Has Lost Its Title, Thanks To Climate Change

Sweden's Tallest Peak Has Lost Its Title, Thanks To Climate Change The heat waves that baked Europe over the past two summers have been directly linked to climate change, and this year’s had the added oomph of coming amidst the hottest month in recorded history for the planet. While there were obviously more serious impacts from the record heat, such as the deaths of roughly 1,500 people in France or billions of tons of ice falling into the ocean off Greenland, Sweden’s shrinking mountain is a reminder that climate change means everything changes.

Climate change is a global challenge that has no borders and to combat it requires coordinated work by all countries. Many people do not know what it In these pages, we tackle the subject from an objective, scientific viewpoint, discussing the causes and consequences of climate change and how

Climate change , even in its early stages, had begun to hurt: watching a California city literally called And the third realization? People began to understand that the biggest reason we weren’t making full, fast What’s changed most of all is the mood. The defiant notion that we would forever overcome

The resulting expansion of the warming sea water, combined with the faster-than-anticipated melting of the ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica, could push up global sea levels by more than 2 meters in the next 80 years, it found.

New York could disappear from view

This means that major cities across the world including New York, Venice and Amsterdam could be submerged, displacing up to 187 million people globally, according to the study published in the journal Proceedings of the US National Academy of Sciences.

A separate study due to be published next week by the United Nation's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is expected to warn that the cost of flood damage could soar by 100, or even 1,000-fold globally - running into tens, or even hundreds, of billions of pounds a year - as sea levels rise and storms intensity further.

As climate change asserts itself, the world is starting to take notice, however.

The Paris Agreement

In December 2015 world leaders signed an ambitious pledge, known as the Paris Agreement, that agreed to limit global warming to no more than 2C and 1.5C if possible.

The agreement was hailed as a major breakthrough in the battle against global warming - and it was. But it was also only a start.

Since that agreement, there has been increasing evidence that even 1.5C of warming, let alone 2C, would cause huge problems for large swathes of the world.

Don’t COP out on climate, conference hosts told

Don’t COP out on climate, conference hosts told Scotland and the UK should not yet be boasting about their “world-leading” action to save the planet after Glasgow was selected as the venue for next year’s prestigious United Nations climate change conference, environmentalists are warning. © Provided by Johnston Publishing Ltd On winning the bid to stage the summit, international development secretary Alok Sharma said the decision was “testimony to the UK’s leading role in the global fight against climate change”.

1. How much is the planet warming up ? 2 degrees is actually a significant amount. But even if those computer forecasts did not exist, a huge amount of evidence suggests that scientists have the basic The most extreme version of climate denialism is to claim that scientists are engaged in a worldwide

1.5°C Changes Everything . Here is how fast climate policy has changed , though. In scenarios that model the kind of deep and rapid cuts needed for hitting the 1.5 What’s more important for readers is that if indeed Sivaram and Revkin are joining all the nations of the world in acknowledging that 1.5°C

And, not surprisingly, it is turning out to be harder to deliver the pledge than to agree it. Donald Trump, in particular, is making it difficult by pledging to pull the US out of the Paris Agreement at the earliest opportunity - which for technical reasons can't happen until the day after the next presidential election.

The Brazilian problem

Meanwhile, following President Jair Bolsonaro's election in Brazil in January, farmers have been given tacit permission to illegally burn huge swathes of the Amazon Rainforest - the world's biggest carbon sink - for cattle and soy, campaigners claim.

A single tree left standing in a deforested area of the Amazon rainforest in South America (Photo: Getty)

Against this gloomy backdrop, however, there is cause for hope - in particular from the younger generation who are least responsible for the problem but have the most to lose.

Areeba Hamid, Senior Climate Campaigner at Greenpeace UK, said: "From forest fires to heatwaves, almost daily something new brings the stark reality of the climate emergency to life."

"But as the crisis has become harder to ignore, new signs of hope have also emerged. With the likes of the schools' strikes and Extinction Rebellion bringing both young and old onto the streets, we’ve seen the climate emergency thrust to the centre of public conversation like never before. Public concern has reached record levels, people want action."

'From forest fires to heatwaves, almost daily something new brings the stark reality of the climate emergency to life'

UN climate summit ‘to boost Glasgow’s economy by £73m’

UN climate summit ‘to boost Glasgow’s economy by £73m’ A UN climate change conference bringing world leaders to Glasgow next year could benefit the city’s hospitality sector by more than £73 million. © Provided by Johnston Publishing Ltd The city has won the bid to host the 26th Conference of the Parties (COP26), with up to 200 world leaders and 22,500 delegates expected to attend. It has been described as the most important climate change summit since the Paris Agreement in 2015.

Start by marking “ Climate Change : What Everyone Needs to Know ” as Want to Read This book offers the most up - to - date examination of climate change 's foundational science, its implications As the world struggles to stem climate change and its effects, everyone will become a part of this

Climate change is more a matter of mitigating losses than simply winning a fight. Climate change didn’t have a starring role, but it was there and the conference led to the establishment of the Learn about climate change and talk about it, let an awareness of the issue become part of how you work

Areeba Hamid

An Ipsos Mori survey last month found that 85 per cent of British people are worried about climate change, with 52 per cent "very concerned".

This is the highest level of anxiety about the topic recorded since the polling company began tracking it in 2005, and a significant jump on the low point of 60 per cent in 2013.

Meanwhile, this week will see perhaps the biggest youth demonstration yet with Greta Thunberg, the 16-year-old Swedish climate campaigner, leading a global climate strike from New York on Friday.

Greta Thunberg pictured just before setting sale for New York from Plymouth last month (Kirsty Wigglesworth/Pool via REUTERS)

UN climate change summit

And next Monday world leaders will meet for a UN climate action summit in New York to discuss how to step up their targets to reduce carbon emissions.

The latest UN analysis shows that if we act now, we can drastically cut carbon emissions within 12 years and hold the increase in the global average temperature to well below 2C and even 1.5C.

"There is still time to tackle climate change but it will require an unprecedented effort from all sectors of society," says UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres.

The world's largest climate protest yet, followed by a fruitful meeting among world leaders over the next week or so, could go down as a crucial step forward. It'll require sacrifices, but there is work to be done.

This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 250 news outlets to strengthen coverage of the climate story.

Climate change could lead to food shortages say MPs.
The UK's food supply could be at risk as a result of the impact of climate change on agriculture around the world. MPs say the government needs to recognise the risks to national food security from importing 40% of food, including a fifth of fruit and vegetables from countries at risk of "climate breakdown". The risks are heightened by uncertainty over trade after Brexit, according to the the report from the Environmental Audit Committee. Its chair Mary Creagh said: "We are facing a food security crisis, exacerbated by uncertainty over the UK's future trading position with the EU and the rest of the world.

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