UK News: Brexit secretary heads for Brussels as hopes build for a deal - PressFrom - United Kingdom
  •   
  •   

UK News Brexit secretary heads for Brussels as hopes build for a deal

08:25  20 september  2019
08:25  20 september  2019 Source:   news.sky.com

The UK Parliament is closed, so what happens next?

The UK Parliament is closed, so what happens next? After rejecting Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s second attempt to force a general election, parliament has been suspended. This past week saw a group of cross-party MPs seize control of the Commons to force through a bill aimed at blocking a no-deal Brexit, veteran Tory MPs ejected from the Conservative Party and Jacob Rees-Mogg lie supine across Commons leather. Yet what happens now? MPs are due back in parliament on 14 October for what’s known as the Queen’s Speech, which officially opens the House of Commons once more. Three days later on the 17th, EU leaders will gather for a crucial summit in Brussels.

Brexit Secretary Stephen Barclay will meet the EU's chief negotiator later as hopes build that both sides could be close to a Brexit deal . Mr Barclay will head to Brussels for talks with Michel Barnier, when the pair will "take stock" of progress so far, according to his department.

Brexit is the scheduled withdrawal of the United Kingdom (UK) from the European Union (EU). It follows a referendum held in the UK on 23 June 2016

Stephen Barclay wearing a suit and tie standing in front of a building: Brexit Secretary Stephen Barclay is heading to Brussels © Getty Brexit Secretary Stephen Barclay is heading to Brussels Brexit Secretary Stephen Barclay will meet the EU's chief negotiator later as hopes build that both sides could be close to a Brexit deal.

Mr Barclay will head to Brussels for talks with Michel Barnier, when the pair will "take stock" of progress so far, according to his department.

It comes after European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker told Sky News on Thursday that "we can have a deal" on Brexit.

Video: Juncker: Brexit will happen

Mr Juncker said a no-deal Brexit would have "catastrophic consequences" and said he was doing "everything to get a deal".

Brexit at an impasse: What comes next?

Brexit at an impasse: What comes next? After MPs rejected Prime Minister Boris Johnson's second bid to call an early election to solve the Brexit impasse, he is left in limbo heading towards a crucial EU summit next month, just days before Britain's scheduled exit. Here are some possible scenarios for the coming weeks: Brexit delay Britain will leave the European Union on October 31 unless it asks the bloc to delay, and the leaders of the other 27 member states agree. Johnson wants to keep this date, but many MPs fear his threat to leave without agreeing divorce terms with Brussels would cause huge disruption.

British Brexit Secretary David Davis and the EU's chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, kicked off talks in Brussels on June 19. The first round ended with On March 29, the day that the UK was supposed to leave the EU, British lawmakers voted for a third time against May's deal — rejecting it this time with

Dominic Raab says ‘vigour’ needed in EU negotiations as David Lidington hints November deal more likely.

And he said he did not have "an erotic relation" to the so-called backstop, which he said he was prepared to remove from a withdrawal agreement, so long as "alternative arrangements [are put in place] allowing us and Britain to achieve the main objectives of the backstop. All of them".

What next for Brexit? Follow key developments, expert analysis and multiple perspectives as the UK edges closer to leaving the EU

In a UK exclusive interview with Sky's Sophy Ridge, Mr Juncker confirmed that he had been sent documents by Prime Minister Boris Johnson outlining draft ideas for a new Brexit deal.

Mr Juncker, however, said they had arrived late on Wednesday night, and he had yet to read them.

The 64-year-old, who spent nearly two decades as the prime minister of Luxembourg, became president of the commission five years ago. His term finishes on 31 October, the same day that the United Kingdom is due to leave the European Union.

Deal or no-deal, Brexit's puppet master has more strings to pull

Deal or no-deal, Brexit's puppet master has more strings to pull Deal or no-deal, Brexit's puppet master has more strings to pull

Theresa May and Jean-Claude Juncker announce agreement after last-minute talks, paving the way for trade discussions.

A deal in time for the October 31 exit deadline was given fresh hope when two prominent EU figures talked up its chances. Brexit Secretary Steve Barclay will meet the EU’s Michel Barnier for political talks in Brussels . Transport Secretary Grant Shapps admitted the Government is holding back its

Jean-Claude Juncker © Reuters Jean-Claude Juncker Earlier this week, he met the PM in Luxembourg - the first time the two men had met since Mr Johnson took over in Number 10. They spoke for two hours over a working lunch before Mr Johnson went off for his ill-fated meeting with Luxembourg's Prime Minister Xavier Bettel.

"I had a meeting with Boris Johnson that was rather positive," Mr Juncker said.

"I think we can have a deal. I am doing everything to have a deal because I don't like the idea of a no-deal because I think this would have catastrophic consequences for at least one year.

"We are prepared for no-deal, and I hope Britain is prepared as well - but I'm not so sure."

Gallery: Brexit timeline (Photo Services)

Asked if he had received the proposals from the British government, he said they had arrived "yesterday night" but he'd had no opportunity to read them yet. But he added that he had spoken to Mr Johnson on the phone "without knowing the content of the British proposals".

But Mr Juncker did confirm to Sky News that he was now prepared to get rid of the controversial backstop plan, designed to prevent the return of a hard border between Ireland and Northern Ireland, but only on condition that "alternative arrangements [are put in place] allowing us and Britain to achieve the main objectives of the backstop."

The backstop has been widely criticised as having the potential to tie Britain to European Union rules for an indefinite amount of time.

Mr Juncker agreed that a deal would revolve around the idea that Northern Ireland would follow EU rules on food and agriculture, with other checks being done away from the border.

"It is the basis of a deal. It is the starting and the arrival point," he said. "The internal market has to be preserved in its entirety."

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker and European Union's chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier leave after their meeting in Luxembourg, September 16, 2019. REUTERS/Yves Herman © Thomson Reuters British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker and European Union's chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier leave after their meeting in Luxembourg, September 16, 2019. REUTERS/Yves Herman Britain's new proposals are believed to revolve around a collection of ideas, known as the alternative arrangements, designed to offer a suite of separate guarantees that would satisfy politicians in Brussels and London, while avoiding the need for infrastructure on the border.

Mr Juncker said: "I was asking the prime minister the other day to make concrete proposals as far as so-called alternative arrangements are concerned, allowing us and Britain to achieve the main objectives of the backstop. I don't have an erotic relation to the backstop. If the results are there, I don't care about it."

Asked if that meant that the backstop could go, he answered: "If the objectives are met - all of them - then we don't need the backstop. It was a guarantee, not an aim by itself."

He remains hopeful that a deal can be done before he leaves office.

"Brexit will happen," said Mr Juncker.

Full interview in Sophy Ridge on Sunday at 8.30am

MSN UK is committed to Empowering the Planet and taking urgent action to protect our environment. We’re supporting Friends of the Earth to help solve the climate crisis, please give generously here or find out more about our campaign here.

Jeremy Corbyn sees off pro-Remain rebellion as Labour conference votes to stay neutral on Brexit .
The Labour leader's preferred Brexit policy succeeded at the party conference in BrightonLabour's policy on Brexit will now be decided at a special conference after the next election. It comes after a bruising stand-off within the party, as activists clashed with the unions over whether to campaign to stay in the EU for good.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!