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UK News Two convicted of stealing viking coins in Herefordshire.

07:00  22 november  2019
07:00  22 november  2019 Source:   closeronline.co.uk

Two metal detectorists convicted of stealing £3m of Viking coins

  Two metal detectorists convicted of stealing £3m of Viking coins Two metal detectorists have been convicted of stealing a £3m hoard of Viking coins and jewellery - much of which is still missing. George Powell and Layton Davies were found guilty at Worcester Crown Court after failing to declare the "invaluable" collection of buried treasure, which dated back 1,100 years to the reign of King Alfred the Great, then conspiring to sell it on. Prosecutors said the items, typical of a Viking hoard burial from the Anglo-Saxon period, were dug up on Herefordshire farmland in June 2015.

Prosecutors said the items, many of which were Anglo Saxon but are typical of a Viking burial hoard, were dug up on Herefordshire farmland in June Both men also claimed talk of a 300- coin hoard had been a rumour, insisting that the only coins they found were declared to the National Museum Wales

Two metal detectorists have been convicted of stealing a £3 million Viking hoard of coins and priceless jewellery - much of which is still missing. George Powell, 38, and Layton Davies, 51, failed to declare an "invaluable" collection of buried treasure dating back 1

coins © Credits: Crown Prosecution Service coins

Two people have been convicted of stealing three million pounds worth of viking coins and jewellery.

They'd dug it up on Herefordshire farmland back in 2015, but didn't tell the authorities about it.

The 300-coin hoard and its priceless jewellery dated to around the ninth century. It was a tumultuous period of history in which Alfred the Great, then just King of Wessex, fought a series of battles against the Vikings.

Probably buried by the retreating Vikings, the trove was dug up 1,100 years later by metal detectorists George Powell and Layton Davies

a man and a woman walking down a street: thief © Credits: Press Association thief

A jury also found two other men guilty of conspiring to conceal the hoard.

Two metal detectorists guilty of stealing £3m hoard of Viking treasure

  Two metal detectorists guilty of stealing £3m hoard of Viking treasure Among the priceless trove was a gold ring, a fifth century crystal rock pendant, and up to 300 coins.George Powell, 38, and Layton Davies, 51, failed to declare an “invaluable” collection of buried treasure dating back 1,100 years to the reign of King Alfred the Great.

Two metal detectorists have been convicted for stealing millions of pounds of rare Viking coins . George Powell, 38, and Layton Davies, 51, failed to Prosecutors said the items, many of which were Anglo Saxon but are typical of a Viking burial hoard, were dug up on Herefordshire farmland on 2

Two metal detectorists stole a £ 3 m Viking hoard that experts They were convicted of theft and concealing their find. Two metal detectorists who unearthed an astonishing hoard of gold jewellery, silver ingots and coins buried more than 1,000 years ago by a Viking warrior in Herefordshire

Dr Gareth Williams, curator of early medieval coinage at the British Museum, said:

"It is not just the theft of the objects that is important in this case.

It is the fact that the knowledge has effectively been stolen from everyone."

Photos on Davies' phone - deleted and then recovered by police - showed many more items dug out of the ground on farmland near Leominster, including more ingots and up to 300 coins.

a close up of items on a table: viking © Credits: Crown Prosecution Service viking

Herefordshire Local policing commander, Superintendent Sue Thomas said:

"This has been a lengthy and detailed investigation that I am pleased to see has resulted in four men being found guilty of the crimes."

She continued:

"I hope the result from this trial demonstrates to the metal detecting community we take this sort of crime very seriously. It is a criminal offence to not declare finds of treasure to the local coroner’s office."

Metal detectorists convicted of stealing a £3 million Viking hoard of coins and jewellery

  Metal detectorists convicted of stealing a £3 million Viking hoard of coins and jewellery Two metal detectorists have been convicted of stealing a £3 million Viking hoard of coins and priceless jewellery - much of which is still missing. © Provided by Johnston Publishing Ltd George Powell, 38, and Layton Davies, 51, failed to declare an "invaluable" collection of buried treasure dating back 1,100 years to the reign of King Alfred the Great.Prosecutors said the items, many of which were Anglo Saxon but are typical of a Viking burial hoard, were dug up on Herefordshire farmland on June 2, 2015.

UK News Two metal detectorists guilty of stealing £3m hoard of Viking treasure. 18:35 21 november 2019. Two metal detectorists who unearthed an astonishing hoard of gold jewellery, silver ingots and coins buried more than 1,000 years ago by a Viking warrior in Herefordshire have been found guilty

Five of the coins are examples of the exceptionally rare Two Emperors penny, valued at up to £50,000 apiece, and so-called as they depict Prosecutors said the items, many of which were Anglo Saxon but are typical of a Viking burial hoard, were dug up on Herefordshire farmland on June 2, 2015.

coins 2 © Credits: West Mercia Police coins 2

Powell, of Kirby Lane, Newport & Davies, of Cardiff Road, Pontypridd, will be sentenced tomorrow.

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a close up of items on a table © Crown Prosecution Service

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