UK News: The London Bridge Attack Shows We Must Bolster, Not Abolish, Offender Reintegration - - PressFrom - United Kingdom
  •   
  •   

UK News The London Bridge Attack Shows We Must Bolster, Not Abolish, Offender Reintegration

15:40  02 december  2019
15:40  02 december  2019 Source:   huffingtonpost.co.uk

London Bridge attack: Shocking video appears to show moment man shot by police

  London Bridge attack: Shocking video appears to show moment man shot by police A shocking video appears to show the moment a man was shot by police after several people were injured and London Bridge evacuated in what police are treating as a suspected terror-related incident. An eyewitness in contact with Yahoo News UK posted a video on social media around 40 minutes after police said they were called to reports of a stabbing at around 2pm in central London. Scotland Yard confirmed one man had been shot by police. HeAn eyewitness in contact with Yahoo News UK posted a video on social media around 40 minutes after police said they were called to reports of a stabbing at around 2pm in central London. Scotland Yard confirmed one man had been shot by police.

London Bridge attacker Usman Khan was jailed for terrorism offences in 2012, the Met said. He was part of the Stock Exchange plot which was disrupted We believe that the attack began inside before he left the building and proceeded onto London Bridge , where he was detained and subsequently

On 3 June 2017, a terrorist vehicle-ramming and stabbing took place in London , England. A van was deliberately driven into pedestrians on London Bridge before crashing on the south bank of the River

a person that is standing in the rain: Flowers and a pictures are left in memory of the victims of the terror attack on London Bridge © ASSOCIATED PRESS Flowers and a pictures are left in memory of the victims of the terror attack on London Bridge

It is now well known that the London Bridge attacker was a former prisoner who had been convicted of terrorism related offences. Not surprisingly, the Conservative government is already calling for an end to early release policies that made it possible for Usman Khan to be at an education event in London with the University of Cambridge initiative, Learning Together. However, the attack only underscores the need to bolster, not abolish, the reintegration approach to working with extremist offenders.

London Bridge terror attack: what we know

  London Bridge terror attack: what we know Police confirm suspect was shot and killed in terror attackDespite reports suggesting that the attacker was wearing explosives, Metropolitan Police assistant commissioner Neil Basu said the device was believed to be a hoax.

How the London Bridge terror attack unfolded – video report. Footage shows a figure in a grey T-shirt and blue jeans, believed to be Conway. He is first seen listening attentively to a talk inside Fishmongers’ Hall. The ex- offender is later among a group who corner Khan on London Bridge .

London Bridge was the scene of another attack , on 3 June 2017, in which eight people were killed and many more injured. This latest attack comes after the UK's terrorism threat level was downgraded on 4 November from "severe" to "substantial", meaning that attacks were thought to be "likely" rather than

As Friday’s tragic incident indicates, no policy is perfect, but the reintegration approach, combined with sophisticated risk assessment, has empirically been shown to be the most effective means of both reducing recidivism and preventing further radicalisation.

All EU member states have adopted general rehabilitation programmes, and the EU’s Radicalisation Awareness Network (RAN) has consistently emphasised rehabilitation for extremist offenders as crucial for both disengagement (behavioural change) and de-radicalisation (cognitive shift). Further, in my research interviews, prison staff, parole officers, and social workers across Europe and the Middle East have underscored the particular importance of reintegration during the license/parole period.

Multiple injuries reported in London stabbing incident

  Multiple injuries reported in London stabbing incident The London Ambulance Service declared a "major incident" on Friday at London Bridge, where multiple people were stabbed by a suspect who was subsequently shot and killed by police, CNN reports. On Twitter, London's Metropolitan Police Service said that "as a precaution, we are currently responding to this incident as though it is terror-related." The chaotic scene unfolded around 1:58 PM, with one nearby worker telling CNN of hearing "more thanThe chaotic scene unfolded around 1:58 PM, with one nearby worker telling CNN of hearing "more than five" gunshots in the area of the iconic bridge, and another saying, "A colleague out for lunch messaged to say there'd been an incident...

Boris Johnson and Priti Patel are trying to make political capital out of a tragedy that has grown out of Tory cuts.

Relevations that the London Bridge attacker was a convicted terrorist, freed halfway through a 16-year sentence, have sparked outrage. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has taken aim at the country's policy of early prisoner release following Friday's deadly London Bridge attack .

In the wake of Friday’s tragedy, it is more important than ever to stay committed to pragmatic solutions rather than emotional responses.

There is still much discussion among policymakers and practitioners about which models work best, however, the approach used by England and Wales has been held up as a model. While early release is understandably controversial, it helps prevent “detention damage”, which can fuel the individual’s radicalisation process, and also helps prevent the spread of radical ideas within prisons, especially when they are overcrowded.

Early release is most effective when used with risk assessment tools that look at different indicators to determine an individual’s likelihood to re-offend. Developed by the National Offender Management Service (NOMS), the Extremism Risk Guidelines (ERG 22+) methodology used by England and Wales is based on learning from casework with offenders, and has been recommended for focusing on factors of identity rather than ideology (which is the main motivating factor in only a minority of cases).

Trump 'pledges support' after London Bridge attack leaves one dead

  Trump 'pledges support' after London Bridge attack leaves one dead Donald Trump has condemned the London Bridge Terror attack as a “horrific act of violence” - and pledged support to the UK. The American president’s statement came after a terror attack unfolded in London Bridge on Friday afternoon. The attack left one person dead, as well as several with knife injuries. The suspect, who was shot dead at the scene by police, was believed to have been wearing a hoax explosive device. Mr Trump has been briefed onThe American president’s statement came after a terror attack unfolded in London Bridge on Friday afternoon.

PM under fire for ‘distasteful’ attempt to score election points … Nigel Farage defends Trump friendship … and Liam Payne on life after 1D.

Former prisoner was attending event for Learning Together initiative when he began attack .

Once released on license, individuals must comply with monitoring regulations, such as GPS tracking tags, and some, like Khan, are required to participate in the government’s Desistance and Disengagement Programme (DDP). Piloted in 2017 and added to CONTEST (the UK’s counter-terrorism strategy) in 2018, the initiative has been held up as a promising new practice by providing tailored interventions and practical support such as mentoring, psychological support, and theological advice to reduce re-offending and facilitate re-integration.

In accordance with best practice recommendations from RAN, the UK has also established so called Multi-Agency Centres (MACs) to improve information flows between related agencies and facilitate early interventions. Further, the Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangement (MAPPA) aims to ensure that offenders’ rehabilitation needs are balanced with the risk they may pose to society.

Once released on license, parole officers in my research have stressed the importance of supported transition management, capacity building, and social and organization support. These priorities can help prevent the stigmatization that reinforces radicalized identities. The Learning Together initiative of which Khan was a part, which involved both prisoners and former prisoners in an education programme with Cambridge students and alumni, is an example of the type of initiative that provides both skills development and community reintegration.

London attacker named, was previously convicted of terrorism offences

  London attacker named, was previously convicted of terrorism offences London attacker named, was previously convicted of terrorism offences and was released from prison last year. "This individual was known to authorities, having been convicted in 2012 for terrorism offences," Britain's top counter-terrorism police officer, Neil Basu, said in a statement. "He was released from prison in December 2018 on licence and clearly, a key line of enquiry now is to establish how he came to carry out this attack," Basu said. A person who is released on licence is subject to conditions for the duration of their sentence after leaving prison.

Relevations that the London Bridge attacker was a convicted terrorist, freed halfway through a 16-year sentence, have sparked outrage. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has taken aim at the country's policy of early prisoner release following Friday's deadly London Bridge attack .

The horrific terrorist attack at London Bridge on Friday afternoon demonstrated both the very best This incident is yet another warning that we must do far more to root out the poison of extremism. I have no doubt that in the coming days Londoners will once again show the world exactly why our

In other words, in the case of Khan, the UK was doing most things right, or at least as right as we know how, based on research and best practices from across the EU. Indeed, Her Majesty’s Government, like many states, has responded to criticisms of earlier policies under the original Prevent programme to move towards more integrated approaches that have shown promise to be more effective.

So what went wrong? In the case of Khan, we may not ever know. He is not the first, and won’t be the last, to re-offend, even in the best rehabilitation systems. It is natural after a tragedy like Friday’s to condemn the policies that enabled Khan to be where he was, when he was, at that time, but that would be a mistake. Khan should be seen as an outlier, rather than emblematic, of a constantly evolving counter-terrorism strategy that has been overall effective.

Further, Friday’s attack should not be politically exploited to justify policy preferences terminating early releases and prison education programmes. Even David Merritt, the father of one of the victims, Jack Merritt, wrote on Twitter that his son “would not wish his death to be used as the pretext for more draconian sentences or for detaining people unnecessarily.”

Indeed, in the wake of Friday’s tragedy, it is more important than ever to stay committed to pragmatic solutions rather than emotional responses. The UK’s approach to rehabilitating and reintegrating extremist offenders has been improving, and it is not the time to derail that progress. The system didn’t fail Khan, rather, he failed an otherwise well-informed and effective system.

Julie Norman, PhD (@DrJulieNorman2) is a Teaching Fellow in Politics and International Relations at University College London (UCL) and a member of the EU’s Radicalisation Awareness Network (RAN).

a man standing in front of a building: Flowers and a pictures are left in memory of the victims of the terror attack on London Bridge © ASSOCIATED PRESS Flowers and a pictures are left in memory of the victims of the terror attack on London Bridge

London Bridge victims died after being stabbed in chest, inquest hears .
The two victims of the London Bridge terror attack died after being stabbed in the chest, an inquest has heard. University of Cambridge graduates Jack Merritt, 25, and 23-year-old Saskia Jones were killed by convicted terrorist Usman Khan during his deadly rampage last Friday. © PA Jack Merritt was a coordinator at a prisoner rehabilitation conference Mr Hall was working as a co-ordinator at a prisoner rehabilitation conference at Fishmongers' Hall where Khan launched his attack, while Ms Jones was a volunteer at the event.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
usr: 0
This is interesting!