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UK News Man charged in the UK for selling fake coronavirus kits around the world

16:35  22 march  2020
16:35  22 march  2020 Source:   inews.co.uk

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A man has been charged with making dozens of fake coronavirus treatment kits and trying to sell them around the world . Two days earlier, US customs officers in Los Angeles intercepted a package containing 60 fake kits labelled "Anti-Pathogenic treatment" and sent from the UK .

World . UK selected. A man has appeared in court charged with making fake kits which claimed to treat Covid-19. Mr Ludlow has been charged with one count of fraud by false representation, one count of possession of articles for use in fraud and one count of unlawfully manufacturing a medicinal

  Man charged in the UK for selling fake coronavirus kits around the world © Provided by The i

Frank Ludlow, 59, of West Sussex, was arrested in his local post office while attempting to post packages on Friday.

He was charged on Saturday with one count of fraud by false representation, one count of possession of articles for use in fraud, and one count of unlawfully manufacturing a medicinal product.

  Man charged in the UK for selling fake coronavirus kits around the world © Provided by The i Coronavirus symptoms explained: from what a 'persistent' or 'continuous' cough means to definition of a high temperature How to self-quarantine, and the latest advice on who in the UK needs to do it Does my business need to shut? Full list of businesses ordered to close immediately This is what the latest UK coronavirus travel advice actually is Here's who are considered key workers

On the same day, he appeared at Brighton Magistrates Court and was remanded in custody until 20 April 2020.

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LONDON (Reuters) - British police said on Saturday they had charged a man with making counterfeit treatment kits for coronavirus , and sending them During a search of Ludlow's home, police found 300 more treatment kits and an estimated 20 litres of chemicals used in the production of the fake kits .

A 59-year-old appears in court after fake treatment kits were sold online. Image caption Police warned people to only buy medicines and kits - like this genuine coronavirus testing kit Mr Ludlow has been charged with one count of fraud by false representation, one count of possession of articles

Intercepted in LA

The border protection agency in Los Angeles, US, intercepted a package on the 18 March, containing 60 separate COVID-19 treatment kits labeled as ‘Anti-Pathogenic treatment’, which had been sent from the UK.

Ludlow was arrested on Friday while he was attempting to send 60 more fake treatment kits to France, the US, and the UK.

Officers found 300 more treatment kits and an estimated 20 litres of chemicals for the fake kits when they searched his home.

Dangerous chemicals

The kits are thought to contain potassium thiocyanate and hydrogen peroxide, both of which are extremely harmful chemicals if the user is instructed to wash and rinse their mouth with them.

The police found these chemicals being used in the fake coronavirus testing kits. (credit: City of London Police)

Man charged in UK with trying to sell fake coronavirus treatment kits around world

  Man charged in UK with trying to sell fake coronavirus treatment kits around world A man has been charged with making dozens of fake coronavirus treatment kits and trying to sell them around the world. © Other Detectives say the counterfeit kits were sent abroad. Pic: Police Intellectual Property Crime Unit Frank Ludlow, 59, was arrested by City of London Police on Friday allegedly in the act of sending kits from a post office near his home in West Sussex.Two days earlier, US customs officers in Los Angeles intercepted a package containing 60 fake kits labelled "Anti-Pathogenic treatment" and sent from the UK.

A man has appeared in court charged with making counterfeit coronavirus treatment kits and sending them across the world , City of London Police said. Officers from the force’s Intellectual Property Crime Unit (PIPCU) arrested Frank Ludlow, 59, of West Sussex, in a post office near to his home address on

Man charged in UK with trying to sell fake coronavirus treatment kits around world . With around 23% of people aged over 65, Italy has the oldest population in the world after Japan. Medical experts say these demographics could explain why the number of dead in Italy is so much higher than the rest

Police are awaiting the results of forensic testing on the kits to determine exactly how dangerous they are.

Ludlow’s arrest follows a joint investigation by the City of London Police Intellectual Property Crime Unit, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency in the UK, and the United States Food and Drug Administration.

'Some still in circulation'

Detective Chief Superintendent Clinton Blackburn, from the City of London Police, said: “Fraudsters are constantly looking for ways in which they can exploit people, including using global emergencies, and times of uncertainty for many, to defraud people out of their money.

“While police have taken swift action to arrest this individual, we believe some of these kits may still be in circulation.

"If you have purchased one of these kits, it’s important you do not use it. Instead, report it to Action Fraud via their website www.actionfraud.police.uk or by calling 0300 123 2040 and quoting ‘Trinity CV19 treatment kits’”.

Tariq Sarwar, Head of Operations at the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency recommends that people with health concerns should only buy medicines from an authorised seller.

He said: “When buying online, beware of illegitimate websites, suspicious URLs and remember that claims like ‘100% safe, no side effects’ or ‘quick results’, are often warning signs.

"Cut prices and speedy deliveries can expose you to fake medicines, identity theft and fraud.”

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