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UK News What is non-essential travel? How the UK's coronavirus travel advice works

15:12  24 march  2020
15:12  24 march  2020 Source:   inews.co.uk

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How the UK ' s coronavirus travel advice works . ‘ Essential ’ travel could include urgent family or business commitments, with circumstances differing from person to person. US President Donald Trump extended the European travel ban to include the UK and Ireland as of Monday 16 March 2020

Check our travel advice for your location regularly and sign-up to email alerts. You must follow the advice of local authorities. Our advice against non - essential travel does not apply to this industry. Read the Department for Transport guidance for Find out more about how our travel advice works .

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With the UK now under lockdown, and more than 6,600 confirmed cases of coronavirus in the country, the government has advised Britons against all non-essential travel in an effort to suppress its spread

The virus, officially named Covid-19, is now evident in more than 120 countries, prompting the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) to impose more stringent travel restrictions.

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Can I still travel in the UK?

The FCO has updated its advice to say that all non-essential travel within the UK should be avoided in an effort to stem the spread of coronavirus.

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Essential travel does not include visits to second homes, camp sites, caravan parks or similar, whether for isolation purposes or holidays. Coronavirus (COVID-19): UK government response. Is this page useful?

CDC provides recommendations for international travel , including guidance on when to consider postponing or canceling travel . Warning Level 3: CDC recommends travelers avoid all nonessential travel to these destinations. Alert Level 2: CDC recommends older adults and people of any age with

The travel ban initially only applied to international travel, but the new guidance now advises against holidays within the UK.

The guidelines state: “Following on from the government’s guidance on social distancing in relation to COVID-19, people should avoid travelling unless it is essential.

“This guidance is for people planning to visit second homes or holiday premises during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

“Essential travel does not include visits to second homes, camp sites, caravan parks or similar, whether for isolation purposes or holidays. People should remain in their primary residence.

“Not taking these steps puts additional pressure on communities and services that are already at risk.”

What other restrictions are in place?

The FCO has advised British citizens against all non-essential travel worldwide, with this advice in effect from Tuesday 17 March 2020. The advice initially applies for a period of 30 days.

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The guidance has been issued to reflect the pace at which other countries are either closing their borders, or implementing restrictive measures, in response to the global coronavirus pandemic.

The Covid-19 pandemic has already led to numerous international border closures and restrictions, and the FCO warns that all countries may restrict travel without notice.

US President Donald Trump extended the European travel ban to include the UK and Ireland as of Monday 16 March 2020, with the ban now covering 26 countries, all of which are members of the Schengen free movement zone.

Numerous other countries also have travel restrictions in place that may affect UK citizens, including quarantine measures, border closures, flight suspensions and health screenings.

Europe is now the epicentre of the outbreak, which originated in Wuhan in China, prompting several European countries to impose restrictions, including popular tourist destinations such as Spain, France and Portugal.

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Latest travel advice for Italy including safety and security, entry requirements, travel warnings and health. We use cookies to collect information about how you use GOV. UK . We use this information to make the website work as well See coronavirus travel advice for guidance on international travel .

Official Global Travel Advisory. Avoid non - essential travel outside of Canada until further notice. To limit the spread of COVID-19, many countries have put in place travel or border restrictions and other measures such as movement restrictions and quarantines.

What does ‘non-essential travel’ mean?

The FCO can advise against all but essential travel to a particular destination, but whether travel is classed as ‘essential’ or not is a decision that rests upon individuals themselves.

‘Essential’ travel could include urgent family or business commitments, with circumstances differing from person to person. The FCO says that only you can make an informed decision based on the risks.

No travel is completely safe, but the official advice always aims to put individuals’ safety first, based on objective judgements.

The FCO says it will advise against all but essential travel when it judges the level of risk to be unacceptably high.

British citizens who decide that they do still need to travel abroad are warned to be fully aware of the increased risks in doing so, including the possibility they may not be able to get home if restrictions are put in place.

Those who are still considering travel should be realistic about the level of disruption they are willing and able to endure.

The FCO is currently not advising British people to immediately return to the UK if they are overseas, except for a few countries that are listed in its latest travel advice.

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However, travellers are urged to be mindful that flights could be cancelled at short notice, or other travel restrictions may be put in place by foreign governments.

If you are currently abroad and wish to leave the country you are in, you should contact your airline or travel company, and your insurance provider, as soon as possible.

Coronavirus: the facts

What is coronavirus?

COVID-19 is a respiratory illness that can affect lungs and airways. It is caused by a virus called coronavirus.

What caused coronavirus?

The outbreak started in Wuhan in China in December 2019 and it is thought that the virus, like others of its kind, has come from animals.

How is it spread?

As this is such a new illness, experts still aren’t sure how it is spread. But similar viruses are spread in cough droplets. Therefore covering your nose and mouth when sneezing and coughing, and disposing of used tissues straight away is advised. Viruses like coronavirus cannot live outside the body for very long.

What are the symptoms?

The NHS states that the symptoms are: a dry cough, high temperature and shortness of breath - but these symptoms do not necessarily mean you have the illness. Look out for flu-like symptoms, such as aches and pains, nasal congestion, runny nose and a sore throat. It’s important to remember that some people may become infected but won’t develop any symptoms or feel unwell.

What precautions can be taken?

Washing your hands with soap and water thoroughly. The NHS also advises to cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when you cough or sneeze; put used tissues in the bin immediately and try to avoid close contact with people who are unwell. Also avoiding touching eyes, nose and mouth unless your hands are clean.

Should I avoid public places?

Most people who feel well can continue to go to work, school and public places and should only stay at home and self isolate if advised by a medical professional or the coronavirus service.

What should I do if I feel unwell?

Don’t go to your GP but instead call NHS 111 or look online at the coronavirus service that can tell you if you need medical help and what to do next.

When to call NHS 111

NHS 111 should be used if you feel unwell with coronavirus symptoms, have been in a country with a high risk of coronavirus in the last 14 days or if you have been in close contact with someone with the virus.

Sources: World Health Organisation and NHS

Foreign Office advises against travel to more than 30 countries .
FCO guidance as of Monday morning advises against all but essential travel to 35 countries .– ChinaThe FCO advises against all travel to Hubei province due to the outbreak, and against all but essential travel to the rest of mainland China. If you are in China and able to leave, the FCO says you should do so.– United StatesOn March 14, the US government extended an existing European travel ban to the UK and Ireland, with the exception of returning US citizens and legal residents.The FCO subsequently updated its advice on March 15 and advises against all but essential travel to the whole country.

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