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UK News MARKET REPORT: Bus firms pick up speed on £218m Covid lifeline

00:47  11 august  2020
00:47  11 august  2020 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

New tests which detect COVID-19 in 90 minutes to be rolled out next week

  New tests which detect COVID-19 in 90 minutes to be rolled out next week New rapid coronavirus tests that can detect the virus in just 90 minutes will start to be used in care homes and labs from next week. © PA Chris Toumazou, chief executive and co-founder of DnaNudge, with the Nudgebox test The two new types of test do not require trained health staff to operate them and can also pick up other winter viruses.Currently most results from tests carried out in-person are returned the following day, while home kits take longer.

That caused bus firms to cut services. Image caption Grant Shapps described buses as a " lifeline " for those who need to make essential trips. Bus companies aim to temporarily lay off around half their staff who will then receive income under the government's coronavirus job retention scheme.

COVID -19 Coronavirus Pandemic. The NHC reported the details of the first 17 deaths up to 24 pm on January 22, 2020. Considering that SARS ended up infecting 5,237 people in mainland China, Wuhan Coronavirus surpassed SARS on January 29, 2020, when Chinese officials confirmed 5,974

Bus companies picked up speed following the Government's pledge to keep funding the sector indefinitely.

The Department for Transport will hand out £218.4million in Covid-19 aid over the next eight weeks to help keep regional bus services – those outside London – running in England.

And it will provide up to £27.3million a week after that 'until a time when the funding is no longer needed'.

a large pink bus is driving down the road © Provided by This Is Money

Bus companies were crippled financially by the need to keep services running for key workers during lockdown, even though they were bringing in hardly any money by doing so.

Driverless car start-up Wejo zooms to £10m funding

  Driverless car start-up Wejo zooms to £10m funding The amount raised by Chester-based Wejo is among the largest secured by a British start-up through the Government's Future Fund, which hands out up to £5million in convertible loans.The amount raised by Chester-based Wejo, which hopes to play a major role in autonomous cars, is among the largest secured by a British start-up through the Government's Future Fund.

Public buses have been retrofitted into dedicated COVID -19 patient transport vehicles, known Buses are used to facilitate the mass transfer of COVID -19 patients between facilities, such as hospitals HOPE Technik is a home-grown engineering firm with expertise in mechanical, electrical & electronics

Skip to content. Pickup - Lines .net. #1 Best Collection of Pick Up Lines . Summary of the best pick up lines from all categories. We calculate the winners with your votes. Covid 19 cancelling everything, except my feelings for you.

And they are still in a bind now - because even though there are rising numbers of people using public transport, they must also stay socially distanced from one another.

The Government reckons buses are now running around 80 per cent of normal services.

But First Group, which yesterday praised the support, said it is now operating around 90 per cent of services, with just 40 per cent of the usual number of customers.

Stock Watch - Yu Group

Utilities minnow Yu Group saw its shares surge 20.7 per cent, or 15p, to 87.5p on a double helping of good news.

AIM-listed Yu Group, which supplies energy and water to small companies, bought the division of Bristol Energy that focuses on business customers from Bristol City Council.

Separately, it also said the London Stock Exchange has decided to waive a £300,000 fine for accounting errors back in 2018, due to the ‘current economic uncertainty’ hitting the company.

Why are so many banks still opening part-time?

  Why are so many banks still opening part-time? Many branches restricted services during lockdown as they battled staff shortages, with some closing doors altogether. It has meant customers have been forced to queue around the block.Many branches restricted services during lockdown as they battled staff shortages, with some closing their doors altogether.

Effects of COVID -19 viral outbreak on public transport. India observed a complete lockdown including all trains, buses , airlines, cars, auto rickshaw for 14 hours on March 22, 2020. the cities could fill up only 50% of their capacity with people at a time.[20].

American hospitals are getting a reprieve as a spike of Covid -19 cases in the Sun Belt eases and the Northeast recovers, giving health-care workers a chance to prepare for what September and October may bring.

Investors cheered the Government's latest funding promise - which was announced alongside plans to publish a 'National Bus Strategy' about how it will support the sector in future.

First Group shares rose 5.7 per cent, or 2.2p, to 41p, while Go-Ahead Group climbed 10.2 per cent, or 60.5p, to 652.5p and Stagecoach by 11.4 per cent, or 5.26p, to 51.4p.

Liberum analysts were also encouraged by the news, which was released on Saturday but only digested by stock markets for the first time yesterday.

Analysts said: 'We see this move as a clear indication of the Government's intention to do whatever it takes to support bus operators through the pandemic.'

Go-Ahead and First Group helped the FTSE 250 index start the week on the right foot – but their gains were upstaged by a roaring 17.6 per cent rally in Cineworld shares.

The cinema group, which owns the Regal chain in the US, has seen its stock see-saw between huge sell-offs as traders worry about the effect the pandemic will have on attendance numbers and racing advances whenever the threat appears to be cooling off.

Alyssa Milano tested positive for Covid-19

 Alyssa Milano tested positive for Covid-19 © De Boer Sara / Startraks / ABACA The Covid-19 epidemic is not over. While in France, more and more cities want to make the mask mandatory outside for fear of a resurgence of the virus, in the United States, it also continues to circulate. And a new star paid the price. Actress Alyssa Milano, known for her role in the series "Charmed" or "Madame est served", has indeed been struck down by Covid-19. She recounted her journey in an Instagram post.

Golden Gate Transit has begun picking up Muni passengers at all Golden Gate Transit bus stops in San Francisco. Stops that were drop-off only or pick - up only will All other items may be picked up when the public health order is lifted and business resumes as usual. COVID -19 Data Dashboard.

MARKET REPORT : Travel firms take off as Britons ignore the quarantine threat and book last minute trips to the Med. A stronger than expected set of results couldn’t stop bus and rail operator FirstGroup from suffering its worst day in a year yesterday.

Shares rose 6.15p to 41.05p as UK investors celebrated a ruling in the US on Friday that ended a series of competition rules known as the 'Paramount Decrees' – and means movie studios could now buy cinemas.

Elsewhere on the mid-cap index, where all of the action seemed to be taking place yesterday, traders piled into shipping firm Clarkson after it effectively reversed a decision on its dividend.

The group, which saw revenues and profits rise between January and June despite the disruption to global trade, had deferred paying a 53p-per-share divi for 2019.

Now it has chosen to pay it as a special dividend, alongside a 25p interim payout. Shares rose 12.1 per cent, or 255p, to 2355p as a result.

And outsourcing group Capita rose by a more modest 1.3 per cent, or 0.5p, to 37.5p after it extended contracts with Transport for London from 2021 to 2026 to manage the congestion charge, low emission zone, ultra low emission zone and other services.

These gains all helped keep the FTSE 250 in the black – and it started the week higher by 0.6 per cent, or 102.01 points, to 17724.94.

flood of balance sheets: DAX slides on red terrain

 flood of balance sheets: DAX slides on red terrain In view of a flood of new company balance sheets, investors are holding back on the German stock market. © Provided by Finanz.net GmbH SAEED KHAN / AFP / Getty Images The DAX is only 0.03 percent higher at 12,664.55 points. After a briefly strong upturn in the morning, the leading German index is now in the red, posting a loss of 0.11 percent to 12,646.31 points. DAX fights for profit zone After an early roller coaster ride, the German stock market has to fight for profits on Thursday.

Ookla® is closely monitoring the impact of COVID -19 on the performance and quality of global mobile and broadband internet networks. We will share regular information based on Ookla data in this article that may assist in the understanding of this unprecedented situation.

LBC is the Philippines’ market leader in payments & remittance, documents & mail, parcels & boxes, and cargo & logistics. We also offer 10AM branch pick up service. The company started its service as a brokerage firm and later on, with the help of Araneta's three sons, they ventured into an air cargo

The FTSE 100 rose 0.3 per cent, or 18.41 points, to 6050.59, and was nudged higher by gains in BP (up 2.8 per cent, or 8.15p, to 295.4p) and Shell (up 1.3 per cent, or 14.6p, to 1131.4p) as they tracked a rise in the oil price, which rose 1 per cent to $44.85 a barrel.

Over on AIM, shares in management software group Ideagen jumped 9.4 per cent, or 16.5p, to 192.5p bought Sheffield-based rival Qualsys for £15.6million.

Read more

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