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UK News What you need to know about the coronavirus right now

00:40  23 september  2020
00:40  23 september  2020 Source:   reuters.com

North East lockdown: 10pm curfew for bars and pubs and ban on household mixing

  North East lockdown: 10pm curfew for bars and pubs and ban on household mixing New local restrictions are being introduced in northeast England - including a 10pm curfew for bars and pubs and a ban on people mixing with others outside their household. Health Secretary Matt Hancock confirmed the measures in a statement to the House of Commons on Thursday morning after the government's talks with North East councils and local MPs.They will come into force from Friday in Northumberland, North Tyneside, South Tyneside, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Gateshead, Sunderland and County Durham.

Coronavirus infections are still rising in 58 countries, including surges in Argentina, Indonesia, Morocco, Spain and Ukraine, according to a Reuters analysis. New cases are falling in the United States and are down about 44% from a peak of more than 77,000 new cases reported on July 16.

The coronavirus outbreak has spread across the world. What You Should Know About the Coronavirus . How can older adults reduce their risk? Disinfect your shopping cart or basket with disinfectant wipes. Use hand sanitizer right away if you handle money, a card or a keypad.

a man wearing a blue hat: FILE PHOTO: Nurse wipes away tears as NYPD polioce thank healthcare workers at NYU Langone Medical Center during outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in New York © Reuters/MIKE SEGAR FILE PHOTO: Nurse wipes away tears as NYPD polioce thank healthcare workers at NYU Langone Medical Center during outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in New York

(Reuters) - Here's what you need to know about the coronavirus right now:

'We're confident' in vaccine, says Russia

Russia is so confident in its COVID-19 vaccine that it will shoulder some of the legal liability should anything go wrong, rather than requiring buyers to take on the full risk, the head of the state fund bankrolling the project told Reuters.

Only one area in the UK where COVID cases are definitely decreasing, study finds

  Only one area in the UK where COVID cases are definitely decreasing, study finds Swindon is the only place in the UK that is definitely seeing a decrease in coronavirus numbers with most places seeing their infections rising, a study has found. An interactive map that uses mathematical modeling to predict how likely a local authority is suffering from an increase in coroanvirus infections shows almost every area of the UK is seeing their case numbers rise. The map predicts only Swindon as ‘definitely’ seeing a decrease in cases.The only other areas that are ‘likely’ seeing a decrease are Aberdeenshire, Aberdeen, Carlisle and Ashford.

Terms to know . Coronavirus : This term refers to a family of seven known viruses that can infect people, ranging from the common cold to severe acute “Flattening the curve”: A phrase that experts use when talking about the need to use protective measures to slow the spread of new cases.

Knowing the answers to these questions now will help you move quickly in any emergency. And it makes sense to rehearse a little — drive by your It’s very possible that even if you have coronavirus , you will never be tested. This is frustrating to patients who have symptoms and want to know if they

The decision leaves the vaccine's state-backed developers open to potentially costly compensation claims should there be any unexpected side-effects. It is something many vaccine-makers have sought to avoid, by asking for full indemnity - complete protection from liability claims - from nations they sell to.

a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Mumbai © Reuters/NIHARIKA KULKARNI Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Mumbai

The approach is different from many places in the world. In the United States, for example, liability for COVID-19 vaccines has been shifted fully to the U.S. government. This shields the developers because widespread inoculation against the disease is considered a benefit to society.

New U.S. COVID-19 cases rise 17% in past week

'Circuit break': PM considering national restrictions on social lives to curb infections

  'Circuit break': PM considering national restrictions on social lives to curb infections Boris Johnson is considering the introduction of new national restrictions - possibly as soon as next week - as the prime minister races to try and get a handle on the spread of coronavirus. With COVID-19 cases now doubling every seven to eight days, the government is looking at introducing nationwide restrictions for a short period to try to "short-circuit" the virus and slow the spread of the disease.Government figures stressed the plans being drawn up stopped short of a full national lockdown, as seen in the spring, when the country was told to "stay at home".

This content was published on September 21, 2020 - 12:09 September 21, 2020 - 12:09. (Reuters) - Here's what you need to know about the The death toll from the spread of coronavirus in the United States was approaching more than 200,000 lives on Monday, more than double the number of

Hong Kong tightened coronavirus restrictions on Sunday, with non-essential civil servants told to work from home from this week, as the global financial hub reported more than 100 daily cases, a record number. "The situation is very serious and there is no sign of it coming under control," Chief Executive

The weekly number of new COVID-19 cases in the United States rose last week for the first time after falling for eight straight weeks, an increase that health experts attributed to schools reopening and parties over the Labor Day holiday.

New cases rose 17% to about 287,000 for the week ended Sept. 20, while deaths rose 5.5% to about 5,400 people after falling for the previous four weeks, according to a Reuters analysis of state and county reports.

(Open https://tmsnrt.rs/2WTOZDR in an external browser for a Reuters interactive graphic)

Thirteen states have seen weekly infections rise for at least two weeks, up from nine states the previous week, according to the Reuters tally. In Arizona, new cases doubled last week.

CDC takes down airborne transmission guidance

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Monday took down its guidance warning on possible airborne transmission of the novel coronavirus, saying that the draft recommendation was posted in error.

The Latest: India maintains surge, adds 93,300 new cases

  The Latest: India maintains surge, adds 93,300 new cases NEW DELHI —India has maintained its surge in coronavirus cases, adding 93,337 new confirmed infections in the past 24 hours. The Health Ministry on Saturday raised the nation’s caseload to more than 5.3 million out of the nearly 1.4 billion people. It said 1,247 more people died in the past 24 hours for a total of 85,619. The country has over a million active cases with about 80% recovery rate. India has been reporting the highest single-day rise in the world every day for more than five weeks. It's expected to become the pandemic’s worst-hit country within weeks, surpassing the United States.

U.S. President Donald Trump has momentarily managed to deflect domestic criticism of his handling of the coronavirus crisis by announcing a suspension Ahead of the coronavirus curve. South Korea, among the first countries to bring a major coronavirus outbreak under control, is now taking steps to

What do you want to know about the coronavirus ? + The coronavirus spreads primarily through droplets from your mouth and nose, especially when you cough or sneeze. Six feet has never been a magic number that guarantees complete protection.

The now-withdrawn guidance, posted on the agency's website on Friday, recommended that people use air purifiers to reduce airborne germs indoors to avoid the disease from spreading.

"CDC is currently updating its recommendations regarding airborne transmission of SARS-CoV-2. Once this process has been completed, the update language will be posted," the agency said.

Presently, the agency's guidance says the virus mainly spreads from person-to-person through respiratory droplets, which can land in the mouth or nose of people nearby.

'Work from home' Johnson to tell UK

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson will tell people on Tuesday to work from home where possible and will curb timings for bars and restaurants to tackle a fast-spreading second coronavirus wave, but the opposition accused him of losing control.

With millions across the UK already under some form of COVID-19 restriction, Johnson will tighten measures in England while stopping short of another full lockdown like he imposed in March, according to his office and ministers.

‘I’ve Lost 33 Friends To Coronavirus – And 32 Were Black’

  ‘I’ve Lost 33 Friends To Coronavirus – And 32 Were Black’ On a day in late March, Hesketh Benoit received a phone call from his friend, the reggae singer Delroy Washington. When Delroy told him he was calling from hospital, Hesketh asked him if it was possible he had coronavirus. He told me: “Oh no man, don’t worry about that. It’s not that. I’m OK. I’m just not feeling right,’” recalls Hesketh, 62, a retired lecturer. “He honestly did not think it was Covid at all.” But as the pair chatted, Hesketh noticed his friend was gasping a bit and sounded chesty. “He wasn’t coughing, but he was breathing deeper. So I told him I’d call him later when he’d got settled.

What Is Coronavirus ? There are seven types of known coronaviruses in the world, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) You are probably contagious right before you begin to show symptoms, but we don’t know for what time period and we don’t know how contagious.

China’s coronavirus outbreak, which originated in Wuhan and continues to upend travel and worldwide markets, has now been confirmed in 14 locations — including 5 cases in the United States as of Sunday. Still, investors are growing increasingly restive about the possibility of a global pandemic.

Just weeks after urging people to start returning to workplaces, Johnson will now advise them to stay at home if they can. He will also order all pubs, bars, restaurants and other hospitality sites across England to start closing at 10 p.m. from Thursday.

Could dengue provide some immunity?

A new study that analyzed the coronavirus outbreak in Brazil has found a link between the spread of the virus and past outbreaks of dengue fever that suggests exposure to the mosquito-transmitted illness may provide some level of immunity against COVID-19.

The not yet published study led by Miguel Nicolelis, a professor at Duke University, and shared exclusively with Reuters, compared the geographic distribution of coronavirus cases with the spread of dengue in 2019 and 2020.

Places with lower coronavirus infection rates and slower case growth were locations that had suffered intense dengue outbreaks this year or last, Nicolelis found.

"This striking finding raises the intriguing possibility of an immunological cross-reactivity between dengue's Flavivirus serotypes and SARS-CoV-2," the study said, referring to dengue virus antibodies and the novel coronavirus.

(Compiled by Linda Noakes; Editing by Alex Richardson)


Video: Sturgeon raises concerns with Matt Hancock over Covid-19 testing backlog (PA Media)

NHS contact tracing app finally launched in England and Wales

  NHS contact tracing app finally launched in England and Wales The NHS coronavirus contact tracing app has finally been launched in England and Wales after months of delay and questions about its effectiveness. The app was trialled first on the Isle of Wight and in the London Borough of Newham and was used to send alerts to users after someone had tested positive.It uses an Apple and Google-developed system, using Bluetooth to keep an anonymous log of people a user has been close to.

At least 15,000 people cram Trafalgar Square in rally against lockdown .
At least 15,000 people have descended on Trafalgar Square and Hyde Park in London as part of an anti-lockdown demonstration. Attendees of the 'We Do Not Consent' rally ditched their masks as they crammed into the public square this afternoon, despite Metropolitan Police pleading with people to stick to coronavirus restrictions.Crowds, who were also warned that violence would not be tolerated at the gathering, carried placards reading 'is this freedom?' and 'end the crazy rules' as they flocked to central London for the demonstration.

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