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UK News New infections are less than one in 400 people in UK's virus hotspots

10:35  27 september  2020
10:35  27 september  2020 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

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As experts urged those in virus hotspots not to over-react, the most recently available weekly figures for Bolton (pictured) - which has been topping the list - show that there were New coronavirus cases are hitting fewer than one in 400 people in any of the UK ' s top 10 virus ' hotspots ', figures reveal.

This estimate of one in 400 people , outside of hospitals and care homes, means I 'm unlikely to meet Currently the UK only carries out antigen tests which show whether someone currently has the Asked about the new tests at the Downing Street briefing earlier, the deputy chief medical officer for England

a group of people on a sidewalk: MailOnline logo © Provided by Daily Mail MailOnline logo
  • Experts have urged people living in virus 'hotspots' not to over-react
  • In Bolton, with a population of 287,000, new infections represent one in 413
  • The same pattern is clear in other hotspots in both the North West or North East
  • New cases of Covid-19 are hitting fewer than one in 400 people in any of the country’s top ten virus hotspots, figures reveal.

    As experts urged those in virus hotspots not to over-react, the most recently available weekly figures for Bolton – which has been topping the list – show that there were 696 new cases reported.

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    New , stricter rules are due to come into force later as Israel enters its second week of lockdown. More than 32 million virus cases have been Demand for coronavirus tests in the UK has been high over the past few weeks and that’ s led to delays in people getting tested and receiving their results back.

    Comparing the UK ’ s epidemic to other countries after Friday saw the biggest rise in deaths so far. A paper released on Friday projected that fewer than 7,000 people would die of coronavirus in the UK in total. People are infected , incubate the virus , develop symptoms, worsen and require hospital The number of confirmed cases can give a hint earlier, since it takes less time to reach testing than

    But as the town has a population of 287,000, the new infections represent less than a quarter of one per cent – or one person in 413.

    Mortality figures for Bolton in the same period – the week up to last Tuesday – show that two people died as a result of Covid, compared with 37 people from other causes.

    The same pattern is clear in the other hotspots, all of them in the North West or North East, with only fourth-placed Liverpool and tenth-placed Pendle recording any Covid-related deaths, at one each. In Liverpool, 61 people died from other causes.

    Liverpool also had the highest figure for new Covid cases (1,132) in the hotspot top ten, but given its much larger population, that represented only 0.227 per cent of its residents, or one in 440.

    Cancer specialist Professor Karol Sikora said it was important that the public, including those living in hotspots, did not over-react.

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    More than 100 residents are suspected to have died with COVID-19 in the county, which has almost 3,500 people living in residential care. The clear difference in the prevalence of the virus in certain parts of the country suggests there could soon be people in some areas straining at the seams to get

    The admission that the virus will continue to cause problems for another year appears to undermine hopes From now on only the very seriously ill who are already in hospital and people in care homes and There is also the possibility that new treatments will be available by then. After the peak, case

    a group of people walking on a city street: People gather near an information board that reads 'Don't mix with other households' in Bolton town centre following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) September 22, 2020 © Provided by Daily Mail People gather near an information board that reads 'Don't mix with other households' in Bolton town centre following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) September 22, 2020

    ‘In Spain, currently the worst-affected country in Europe where the infection rate is higher than these hotspots in the UK, the rate is about 320 people per 100,000, which is less than a third of one per cent – a very small number.

    ‘And then of course the number of those infected who are likely to die is far smaller again, so you have to keep things in perspective.’

    With cancer and heart and circulatory diseases accounting for more than 335,000 deaths a year, Prof Sikora added: ‘There are much bigger killers out there than Covid-19. If we had figures for cancer and heart disease deaths being shown on the news every day, people might see this all a little more clearly.

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    ‘Those conditions need to be treated when they occur and that’s really a problem, so patients will suffer more because of the delays in access to treatment which are building up because of the pandemic.’

    Prof Sikora argued that the return to some kind of lockdown risked losing public support for the Government policy, which he said was already faltering,

    ‘All the time I see people getting more and more fed up with the restrictions, and I imagine that’s even more the case in these hotspot areas.’

    He added: ‘If I were in charge of this, I’d be much more liberal – I’d shield those who are known to be vulnerable: the elderly and those with other underlying health problems.

    ‘Then, for the vast majority, we need to slowly liberate people, not enforce a tighter lockdown.’

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    Virus Hotspots . German infections increased by more than 1 ,000 for a fourth straight day on Friday, rising by 1,586. While that’ s still well below the peak of nearly 7,000 in the spring, Merkel this week ruled out any steps to ease restrictions until the outbreak is under control.

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    Sir John Bell, regius professor of medicine at the University of Oxford, holds more than £773,000 worth of shares in Roche, the pharmaceutical company that made the kits.

    He was also on the company’s board as a non-executive director, but stood down in March.

    In early May, the Government agreed to buy £13.5 million of Roche’s antibody tests, which the firm said were ‘100 per cent accurate’. Sir John states he played no role in the decision.

    a man holding a sign posing for the camera: Sir John Bell, pictured, regius professor of medicine at the University of Oxford, holds more than £773,000 worth of shares in Roche, the pharmaceutical company that made the kits. He states he had no role in the decision for Roche to purchase the antibody kits © Provided by Daily Mail Sir John Bell, pictured, regius professor of medicine at the University of Oxford, holds more than £773,000 worth of shares in Roche, the pharmaceutical company that made the kits. He states he had no role in the decision for Roche to purchase the antibody kits

    There are two types of Covid test. Diagnostic tests tell patients if they currently have the virus, while antibody tests – like the Roche one – reveal if a person has antibody cells in their immune system that prove they had it in the past.

    Following the deal, Sir John appeared on Channel 4 News and Radio 4’s Today programme calling the tests a ‘major step forward’ – but did not mention his links to the firm.

    However, studies revealed that antibodies for Covid-19 quickly wane, and so testing for them reveals little. At the time of the Roche deal, Sir John said: ‘If you test positive with this test, you can say for certain you have had the infection so you will have had Covid-19.’

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    The news comes days after it emerged the UK’s Chief Scientific Adviser, Sir Patrick Vallance, a former president of British drugs giant GlaxoSmithKline, still has a £600,000 shareholding in the firm which is currently involved in developing Covid vaccines. Health Secretary Matt Hancock told LBC radio that Sir Patrick, who also chairs the Government’s expert panel on vaccines, ‘abided by the rules’.

    a sign on a pole: In early May, the Government agreed to buy £13.5 million of Roche¿s antibody tests, which the firm said were ¿100 per cent accurate¿ (pictured: file photo) © Provided by Daily Mail In early May, the Government agreed to buy £13.5 million of Roche¿s antibody tests, which the firm said were ¿100 per cent accurate¿ (pictured: file photo)

    After the Roche contract was signed, a Public Health England (PHE) evaluation found the tests may not be reliable, so plans to make them available to NHS and care workers were dropped.

    Jon Deeks, professor of biostatistics at Birmingham University, called the tests ‘pointless’.

    Sir John told The Mail on Sunday he disagreed with the PHE evaluation but admitted ‘the Government has no real use for antibody tests right now’. Asked if he’d declared his interests in Roche to the Government, Sir John said: ‘Of course they knew – the Department of Health has a long list of my interests.’

    He said that he did not sit on the advisory body involved in the decision to purchase the Roche antibody tests, adding: ‘I did not know about the Roche contract until it was signed. I advised on [diagnostic] home-testing kits, not these ones.’

    While on the board of Roche, he received a salary of £260,000. He announced his decision to step down in December, but held on to his shares in the company, worth £773,000.

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    a man wearing a suit and tie: It emerged that the UK¿s Chief Scientific Adviser, Sir Patrick Vallance (pictured) a former president of British drugs giant GlaxoSmithKline, still has a £600,000 shareholding in the firm which is currently involved in developing Covid vaccines © Provided by Daily Mail It emerged that the UK¿s Chief Scientific Adviser, Sir Patrick Vallance (pictured) a former president of British drugs giant GlaxoSmithKline, still has a £600,000 shareholding in the firm which is currently involved in developing Covid vaccines

    The Oxford professor has worked as an adviser to the Department of Health and Social Care since 2017 in a variety of roles.

    Under former Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt he helped explore ways the Government could work with drugs companies such as GlaxoSmithKline.

    Among his numerous high profile appointments, he also sits on the board of Genomics England, a Government-funded company set up and funded by the Department of Health and Social Care to sequence 100,000 genomes from NHS patients.

    Since March he has been chairman of the Government’s New Test Approvals Group, which assesses virus diagnostic tests.

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