•   
  •   

UK News Scientists to develop live coronavirus vaccine in UK trial

00:25  29 september  2020
00:25  29 september  2020 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

As Covid infections double each week… what IS best for Britain?

  As Covid infections double each week… what IS best for Britain? BEN SPENCER: Covid infections are doubling and experts believe the death toll will soon start to climb. Should ministers act quickly to stop a second wave or hold off to prevent more economic damage?DO NOTHING

Scientists ' to infect 24 people in the UK ' with sluggish genetically-modified coronavirus to develop a ' live ' vaccine that could produce Covid-19 immunity. Up to two dozen people in Britain could be deliberately infected with a weakened form of coronavirus as part of a trial to develop a vaccine

A massive effort is under way to develop a UK vaccine for coronavirus within months and make it available to save lives before the end of the year, the The Oxford trial is expected to recruit people from a range of ages, but scientists will be particularly keen to see how it performs in older people.

a woman in a blue shirt: MailOnline logo © Provided by Daily Mail MailOnline logo

Up to two dozen people in Britain could be deliberately infected with a weakened form of coronavirus as part of a trial to develop a vaccine against Covid-19.

New York-based company Codagenix plans to begin experiments of its vaccine in London by the end of the year.

The jab will be of a type called a live attenuated vaccine, meaning people will be given a genetically-modified version of the coronavirus that is weaker than the real thing but still infectious.

Britain could still get a vaccine by CHRISTMAS, Patrick Vallance says

  Britain could still get a vaccine by CHRISTMAS, Patrick Vallance says Sir Patrick Vallance said it is 'possible' one of the dozens of experimental jabs being trialed on humans could be ready before 2021, insisting 'good progress' was being made.Sir Patrick Vallance said it is 'possible' one of the dozens of experimental jabs being trialed on humans could be ready before 2021, insisting 'good progress' was being made.

The Covid-19 vaccine developed by Oxford University has shown tantalising results so far. A scientist at the Oxford Vaccine Group's facility at the Churchill Hospital in Oxford (Credit: Steve The next stage of the Oxford trial includes volunteers in Brazil, where the coronavirus is currently more

The first human trial in Europe of a coronavirus vaccine has begun in Oxford. Two volunteers were injected, the first of more The vaccine was developed in under three months by a team at Oxford University. Sarah Gilbert, professor of vaccinology at the Jenner Institute, led the pre-clinical research.

Live attenuated vaccines — such as the MMR jab — work by stimulating the immune system in the same way that real Covid-19 would, but by relying on viruses unable to cause severe illness.

Codagenix says its vaccine was successful after a single dose in animal trials and is designed to produce immunity against various parts of the coronavirus, rather than just the 'spike protein' on the outside that many others have focused on.

This could mean it would still work even if the virus mutated. Using a live virus may enable medics to create a type of immunity that is similar to what the body would make naturally.

The trials will be held in the same facility as 'challenge trials' – in which people who have been vaccinated are deliberately exposed to the virus to test the jabs.

NHS contact tracing app finally launched in England and Wales

  NHS contact tracing app finally launched in England and Wales The NHS coronavirus contact tracing app has finally been launched in England and Wales after months of delay and questions about its effectiveness. The app was trialled first on the Isle of Wight and in the London Borough of Newham and was used to send alerts to users after someone had tested positive.It uses an Apple and Google-developed system, using Bluetooth to keep an anonymous log of people a user has been close to.

There are more than 120 coronavirus vaccines in early development across the world. Most of these will never get beyond the laboratory. A further 13 are now in clinical trials : five in China, three in the United States, two in the UK , one in Australia, Germany and Russia. All the vaccine teams are keen

He said two leading vaccine developments at UK universities - Imperial College London and the University of Oxford - would receive a total of £42.5m to support their clinical trials . "Both of these promising projects are making rapid progress and I've told the scientists leading them we will do

Codagenix has previously been reported to be joining the experiment. Details of exactly how the trial of the live attenuated vaccines will be structured have not yet been announced.

Live attenuated vaccines work by stimulating the immune system in the same way that real Covid-19 would, but by relying on viruses unable to cause severe illness (stock image) © Provided by Daily Mail Live attenuated vaccines work by stimulating the immune system in the same way that real Covid-19 would, but by relying on viruses unable to cause severe illness (stock image) shape, circle: The version of the coronavirus used in Codagenix's vaccine is thought to multiply at around a thousandth of the rate of the wild virus (Pictured: The viruses in petri dishes, with the wild one on the left seen to be multiplying faster) © Provided by Daily Mail The version of the coronavirus used in Codagenix's vaccine is thought to multiply at around a thousandth of the rate of the wild virus (Pictured: The viruses in petri dishes, with the wild one on the left seen to be multiplying faster)

The vaccine is likely to be trialled at a 24-bed clinic in Whitechapel, East London, where participants will be quarantined, The Times reports.

The hVIVO clinic will also host 'challenge trials' of coronavirus vaccines, in which people who have had the jabs will be deliberately infected.

10pm pub curfew comes into force in England - this is how the first night went

  10pm pub curfew comes into force in England - this is how the first night went The first night of a 10pm curfew on pubs and restaurants has passed largely without incident in England - but some venues are warning that the absence of late-night drinkers could put their future into jeopardy. In London, there was a small police presence on the streets of Soho last night, but no problems were reported.Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick joined a patrol in Shoreditch, a fashionable area in the capital's east, to remind the public of the measures they need to follow to stop coronavirus from spreading.

A coronavirus vaccine candidate will be tested in a clinical trial in the United Kingdom starting this week. The vaccine combines a weakened Even with an accelerated timeline, it could take up to 12 to 18 months to develop , test and approve a vaccine for public use, Live Science previously reported.

Final clinical trials for a coronavirus vaccine , developed by AstraZeneca and Oxford University, have been put on hold after a participant had a suspected adverse reaction in the UK . Phase 3 trials in vaccines often involve thousands of participants and can last several years.

Although it is unclear whether Codagenix will take part in this, medical news website BioWorld reported in July that the company was planning to do so.

The company is understood to still be seeking approval from the UK's drugs regulator to go ahead with its tests.

Codagenix's vaccine will work by using a slowed-down version of the coronavirus and injecting it into participants.

Covid-19's ability to cause infection and serious disease relies on the virus multiplying rapidly inside the body before the immune system can stop it.

As it does this it can take over the lungs and blood vessels and cause the body to scramble to get rid of it, causing the tell-tale symptoms of fever and coughing, which are the immune system's attempts to cook or expel the viruses.

Codagenix's weakened form of the virus, however, can only multiply about one thousandth as fast as the wild strain (0.1 per cent of the speed).

The company developed the weaker virus by changing its genetic code using a computer programme so that it looks exactly like the wild virus.

Normally the coronavirus uses easy-to-decode sections of genes which allow it to hijack living cells and use them to multiply itself. The modified virus, however, takes significantly longer to achieve the same result.

Care home residents and staff will be first to get a Covid-19 vaccine

  Care home residents and staff will be first to get a Covid-19 vaccine Britons with underlying health conditions were previously told they'd be near front of the queue for a Covid-19 vaccine. But millions with heart disease may have to wait until over-65s are inoculated.Everyone over the age of 80 and NHS staff will be second in line, updated guidance from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation states.

The first human trial of a vaccine to protect against pandemic coronavirus has started in the US. Scientists around the world are fast-tracking research. The biotechnology company behind the work Dr John Tregoning, an expert in infectious diseases at Imperial College London, UK , said: "This

A coronavirus vaccine developed by the University of Oxford appears safe and triggers an immune response. A technique similar to the Oxford one, developed in China, also seems promising. . In total there are 23 vaccines in clinical trials around the world and another 140 in early stage development .

This means it cannot get a head-start on the immune system and the body should be able to destroy it – and form a memory of how to destroy it – before it can cause illness.

Robert Coleman, the company's CEO, told The Times: 'We recode a portion of the virus's genome so that it’s slowly translated by the human host.

'It’s like giving American high-school students Shakespearean English – they’ll read it, but they’ll have a hard time.'

Codagenix intends to make its vaccine one that will be administered by a nasal spray, as the flu jab is given to children.

UK TO HOST WORLD-FIRST 'CHALLENGE TRIALS' TO SPEED UP COVID-19 VACCINE DEVELOPMENT

British scientists will be the first in the world to carry out a controversial study where volunteers are deliberately infected with coronavirus in the race against time to find a vaccine, it was revealed today.

The 'challenge trial' — which could rapidly accelerate the approval of experimental jabs — is said to be set to begin in January at a clinic in east London.

Participants will be infected with a dose of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19, a month after being jabbed with a vaccine, according to the Financial Times.

The study, reportedly funded by the government, could help drug-makers test their Covid-19 vaccines without having to wait for volunteers to naturally catch the virus in the community.

Surge in Covid cases in UK 'could speed up progress on vaccine trials'

  Surge in Covid cases in UK 'could speed up progress on vaccine trials' Oxford University's frontrunner vaccine candidate was supposed to be rolled out this autumn but trials came to a standstill when infection rates in Britain petered out over summer.The UK is now well and truly in the midst of a second wave, with 6,000 new cases every day and hospital admissions doubling every week.

Between 100 and 200 participants are expected to be recruited for the trial, which is being run by a US advocacy group that has campaigned for human challenge trials throughout the pandemic.

It's unclear which vaccine candidate will be tested, but drug giants AstraZeneca and Sanofi have both insisted they aren't taking part. MailOnline has approached Imperial College London — Britain's other jab front-runner — for comment about its involvement.

Challenge trials are commonly deployed by scientists trying to develop a vaccine and have been used in malaria, typhoid and flu. But, unlike those illnesses, there is no proven treatment for people with mild coronavirus, so there is nothing to stop the participants falling seriously ill.

The vaccine to be tested in the project has not been named, and organisers are said to have earmarked a quarantine clinic run by hVivo in Whitechapel, London, to carry out the trials.

Drug researcher hVivo is linked to Queen Mary University of London, while Imperial College London is understood to be the project's academic leader.

Around 2,000 potential volunteers have signed up to take part in challenge studies in the UK.

They have done so through 1Day Sooner, a US-based advocacy group which is made up of 100 leading experts including Nobel Prize-winning scientists.

Read more

Video: 'There is more than enough' flu vaccine (Sky News)

Matt Hancock confirms armed forces help distribute Covid vaccine .
Health Secretary Matt Hancock told the virtual Tory conference that 'the plans are in train' to combine the NHS and the armed forces to make 'the [vaccine] rollout happen'.Matt Hancock today confirmed that the military would be involved in distributing a coronavirus vaccine.

usr: 1
This is interesting!