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UK News Johnson’s Brexit bill clears Commons as Theresa May stays away

04:00  30 september  2020
04:00  30 september  2020 Source:   msn.com

Theresa May insists she will not vote for controversial Brexit legislation

  Theresa May insists she will not vote for controversial Brexit legislation The former prime minister warned the United Kingdom Internal Market Bill will cause “untold damage” to the country’s reputation.The Conservative former prime minister accused the Government of acting “recklessly and irresponsibly” without thinking of the long-term consequences by its willingness to breach international law.

Boris Johnson ’ s legislation to unilaterally override the EU withdrawal agreement has cleared the Commons – despite a minister’s admission it flouts The Bill has also been criticised by every living former prime minister, including Ms May , who said last week she cannot support the legislation and

You might think escaping Boris Johnson a small or thin or feeble reason for breaking up the United Kingdom and I might agree with you but the point is Concerning the contest to succeed May , this minister adds: “We’ll probably all be talking about our departmental records, and how qualified we are

Theresa May sitting in a chair: Theresa May did not vote for the UK Internal Market Bill (House of Commons/PA) © House of Commons Theresa May did not vote for the UK Internal Market Bill (House of Commons/PA)

Boris Johnson’s controversial Brexit bill has cleared its final Commons hurdle – even though a number of senior Tories failed to vote for it.

Former prime minister Theresa May and two ex-attorney generals, Geoffrey Cox and Jeremy Wright, were among 21 Conservatives who did not vote for the UK Internal Market Bill at third reading on Tuesday evening.

MPs back Government compromise on controversial powers to override Brexit deal

  MPs back Government compromise on controversial powers to override Brexit deal The United Kingdom Internal Market Bill did not originally contain a parliamentary ‘lock’ on the use of the powers, prompting uproar.Tory backbench pressure forced the Prime Minister to agree to amend the United Kingdom Internal Market Bill in order to give MPs a vote before the Government can use powers which would breach the Brexit divorce deal brokered with Brussels last year.

Boris Johnson ’ s Brexit deal has become law after it received royal assent from the Queen, having Johnson finally succeeded in getting his bill through the Commons and the Lords after several That completely contravenes the devolution settlement that made it clear that the consent of the devolved

Boris Johnson ' s Brexit bill has passed through its final stage in the House of Commons , clearing the path for Britain to leave The bill 's speedy passage through parliament represents a stark contrast to its fortunes in the last parliament, where it was rejected three times under Theresa May 's premiership.

While some, including ministers, will have been given permission to be away from Westminster or have been paired with opposition MPs, others may have chosen to deliberately abstain.

Mrs May and the two former law officers were among the strongest critics of the legislation which ministers have admitted breaches the UK’s treaty obligations under international law.

Geoffrey Cox wearing a suit and tie: Former attorney general Geoffrey Cox did not vote for the Bill (Stefan Rousseau/PA) © Provided by PA Media Former attorney general Geoffrey Cox did not vote for the Bill (Stefan Rousseau/PA)

The Bill, which passed its third reading by 340 votes to 256, a Government majority of 84, will now go to the House of Lords.

It gives the Government the power to override provisions in the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement – the “divorce” settlement with Brussels signed by Boris Johnson – relating to Northern Ireland.

Brexit: Theresa May accuses the government of threatening "the integrity of the United Kingdom"

 Brexit: Theresa May accuses the government of threatening The MP and former British Prime Minister accused the current government of endangering the peace in Northern Ireland © Kamran Jebreili / AP / SIPA Theresa May BILL - The MP and former British Prime Minister accused the current government of endangering the peace in Northern Ireland She will not vote for the text proposed by her successor Boris Johnson , because it would "cause untold damage to the reputation of the United Kingdom".

THERESA May saved her Premiership last night by fending off a pro-EU Tory rebellion – but only with the help of four Brexiteer Labour MPs. It emerged last night that Downing Street also went to extreme lengths to peel away some Tory rebels and limit the rebellion — with Mrs May ’ s whips demanding

British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson ( AP ). Theresa May should refuse to pay the money the European Union says Britain owes it in legally binding liabilities, Boris Johnson has said. The Foreign Secretary said the PM should follow the example of Margaret Thatcher over the Brexit bill , which is

Ministers argue the measures are necessary to provide a “legal safety net” to protect the Northern Ireland peace process if Britain fails to get an agreement on a post-Brexit free trade deal with the EU.

However the Government has faced fierce criticism from across the political spectrum for going back on commitments made in an international treaty.

Michael Gove in a suit standing in front of a building: Michael Gove has said the Government will not withdraw the Northern Ireland provisions (Stefan Rousseau/PA) © Provided by PA Media Michael Gove has said the Government will not withdraw the Northern Ireland provisions (Stefan Rousseau/PA)

Ministers were able to defuse a wider Tory rebellion after they agreed to amend the legislation to require a Commons vote before the provisions relating to Northern Ireland could be activated.

However there may be further attempts to amend the legislation in the Lords where a number of senior Tories – including former party leader Lord Howard of Lympne – have spoken out against it.

Is Boris Johnson going to ask the Queen to break international law?

  Is Boris Johnson going to ask the Queen to break international law? Boris Johnson has brought Brexit back onto the table with a bill which his own ministers have had to admit could break international law. Facing a Tory rebellion as five former prime ministers and dozens of Tory backbenchers criticised the bill, Johnson offered an amendment to his bill to guard against a rebellion, which passed the Commons committee stage on Tuesday evening without the need to vote. It promises additional votes before the law-breaking powers, which would breach the Withdrawal Agreement with the European Union are used.

Boris Johnson has labelled Theresa May ’ s Brexit deal a “national humiliation” after a fiery encounter with MP’s in Parliament. Mrs May stayed in the House of Commons for the first 27 minutes of Mr Johnson ’ s rant before returning to Downing Street. READ MORE: What happens if May CAN'T get

Foreign Secretary leaves house with his wife after being taped criticising Theresa May over Brexit Boris Johnson was photographed this morning as he left his house with his wife It comes as it emerged he told a private dinner Brexit will not be what 'we want' It comes as Theresa May prepares to gather her warring Cabinet at Chequers to thrash out the

Wednesday, meanwhile, is the deadline set by the EU for the UK to withdraw the Northern Ireland provisions from the legislation.

At talks in Brussels on Monday, the Cabinet Office minister Michael Gove made clear the Government was not prepared to back down despite a renewed threat by the EU of legal action.

Despite their differences the two sides are continuing their negotiations on a free trade deal in talks in the Belgian capital headed by Michel Barnier for the EU and Britain’s Lord Frost.

Both sides have acknowledged that time is running out, and that agreement needs to be in place by mid-October.

Mr Johnson has said that he is prepared to walk away from the negotiating table if it cannot be settled by the EU summit on October 15 as it will be too late to implement before the end of the current Brexit transition period at the end of the year.


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This is interesting!