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UK News Anti-vaxxers exploit confusion over Oxford University data

07:15  28 november  2020
07:15  28 november  2020 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

Initial results from Oxford Covid-19 vaccine ‘encouraging’, say experts

  Initial results from Oxford Covid-19 vaccine ‘encouraging’, say experts The vaccine has been shown to trigger a robust immune response in healthy adults aged 56 and above.The ChAdOx1 nCov-2019 vaccine has been shown to trigger a robust immune response in healthy adults aged 56-69 and people over 70 in phase two clinical trials.

Anti -vaccine campaigners are exploiting confusion over Oxford researchers’ data to cast doubts on their jab’s safety. The Oxford team said on Monday that, overall, the trial suggested the vaccine gave 70 per cent protection – but an initial lower dose for the first of the two jabs required would raise that

Anti - vaxxers could become as contagious as coronavirus itself. It is positive that both Boris Johnson and Matt Hancock have spoken out about the issue recently – but the government needs a clear strategy, and fast.

a man standing in front of water: MailOnline logo © Provided by Daily Mail MailOnline logo

Anti-vaccine campaigners are exploiting confusion over Oxford researchers’ data to cast doubts on their jab’s safety.

Experts fear substantial numbers will refuse the vaccine.

One study predicted only around half of British adults will agree to be vaccinated, severely hitting the ability of the programme to generate herd immunity.

These fears have grown as anti-vaccination campaigners have jumped on criticism of the way the preliminary data from Oxford’s trials has been handled.

The Oxford team said on Monday that, overall, the trial suggested the vaccine gave 70 per cent protection – but an initial lower dose for the first of the two jabs required would raise that protection to 90 per cent.

Boris Johnson will unveil post-December 2 lockdown 'Tiers' TODAY

  Boris Johnson will unveil post-December 2 lockdown 'Tiers' TODAY In a Commons statement today, Boris Johnson is set to confirm the second national lockdown will end in England on December 2, with a return to the regional approach that was in force before. But the rules will be significantly tougher in key respects, leaving the hospitality industry facing 'catastrophic' restrictions while retail is allowed to continue to prop up the economy.The trade-off sparked anger amid warnings that thousands of businesses could be pushed to the wall by the restrictions, even though the hated 10pm pubs curfew is set to be loosened.

People who oppose vaccination – the so-called “ anti - vaxxers ” – are often thought to be the reason for low vaccination rates. The truth is, anti - vaxxers don’t wholly explain low vaccination rates. The influence of the movement is often exaggerated and does not properly explain a complex situation.

But confusion over efficacy of AstraZeneca jab has led firm to start a new trial. There is enough data showing Oxford University 's coronavirus vaccine works to approve the jab next month, one of In light of confusion about how well the jab protects against coronavirus, AstraZeneca is set to run

a group of people standing in front of water: An anti-vax demonstrator talks to police while carrying a large syringe near the headquarters of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in London © Provided by Daily Mail An anti-vax demonstrator talks to police while carrying a large syringe near the headquarters of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in London

However, officials in the US later claimed the lower dose was given to people only under 55, casting doubts over its ability to protect those who need it most. American analysts have even claimed the vaccine would never be licensed in the US.


Video: Oxford Vaccine Group Director Professor Andrew Pollard explains vaccine had 90 per cent protection in some cases (Wales Online)

British scientists have been less critical, noting that full publication of the data is expected in the Lancet medical journal soon.

The Government has asked the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) to assess Oxford’s data, with a view to a rollout early next month.

‘We can see the end of the coronavirus tunnel’: Scientists hail Oxford University vaccine breakthrough

  ‘We can see the end of the coronavirus tunnel’: Scientists hail Oxford University vaccine breakthrough Watch: Oxford COVID vaccine ‘up to 90% effective’ Scientists have hailed the news of the latest successful trial of a coronavirus vaccine, saying they “can see the end of the tunnel”. The results of a large-scale trial of the COVID-19 vaccine developed by the University of Oxford and manufacturer AstraZeneca has been welcomed by health experts and the government. England’s chief medical officer, Professor Chris Whitty, tweeted that it was a “very encouraging step forward”.This is a very encouraging step forward. I would like to say a huge thank you to those who volunteered and the researchers around the country.

An anti-vaccination campaign motivated by religious objections, concerns about effectiveness, and concerns about Parties opposed to the use of vaccines frequently refer to data obtained from the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). ^ " Anti - vaxxers have embraced social media.

Articles on Anti - vaxxers . Displaying 1 - 20 of 58 articles. M-Foto/Shutterstock. Governments need to engage not just with anti - vaxxers , but with concerns about the safety and environmental impact of vaccines.

Sir John Bell, professor of medicine at Oxford and the Government’s life sciences adviser, dismissed the criticism, saying: ‘We weren’t cooking this up as we went along.’ But so-called ‘anti-vaxxers’ have leapt on the confusion to spread fear online.

US campaigner Del Bigtree, producer of the notorious film Vaxxed, described it as a ‘trial disaster’ and sceptics on social media have cast doubts on the vaccine’s safety.

Professor Eleanor Riley, of the University of Edinburgh, said the matter needs to be cleared up rapidly to ensure trust is not lost.

Read more

Oxford vaccine researcher will take Pfizer jab when she is offered it .
As a frontline health worker, Maheshi Ramasamy is likely to be one of the first people offered a vaccine against Covid-19.Dr Maheshi Ramasamy is principal investigator at the Oxford Vaccine Group, and also a consultant at Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

usr: 0
This is interesting!