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UK News EU complains of 'deep dissatisfaction' amid vaccine rollout chaos

06:25  24 january  2021
06:25  24 january  2021 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

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The EU vaccine rollout has been plunged into further chaos after AstraZeneca warned it would deliver fewer doses to Europe because of supply problems. EU Health Commissioner Stella Kyriakides said there was ‘ deep dissatisfaction ’ at the news while Ireland’s Taoiseach Micheal Martin said it may

Hopes for a boost to the EU ’s ailing vaccine rollout have been dealt a heavy blow after AstraZeneca warned initial supplies of its jab would be lower than promised, as the bloc’s leaders – largely at the mercy of pharmaceutical giants – grapple with mounting delays and frustration.

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The EU vaccine rollout has been plunged into further chaos after AstraZeneca warned it would deliver fewer doses to Europe because of supply problems.

The vaccine, developed with Oxford University, has not yet been approved by the EU regulator but even when the expected green light comes at the end of the month, progress is set to be severely hampered.

AstraZeneca had initially promised to deliver 80 million vaccines to the 27 nations by March, but the order has reportedly been reduced to 31 million – a cut of 60 per cent – in the first quarter of the year.

When the AstraZeneca vaccine is given the green light by the EU regulator, its progress is set to be severely hampered. Picture: Stock © Provided by Daily Mail When the AstraZeneca vaccine is given the green light by the EU regulator, its progress is set to be severely hampered. Picture: Stock

The pharmaceutical giant said only that ‘initial volumes will be lower than originally anticipated’ because of ‘reduced yields’ at one of its manufacturing sites.

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The EU Health Commissioner expressed " deep dissatisfaction " at the news. The AstraZeneca vaccine , developed with Oxford University, has not yet been approved by the EU 's drug Meanwhile Hungary's government, which has complained over the time it is taking EU regulators to approve the

The European Union has so far approved vaccines from Pfizer and its German partner BioNTech as well as from US company Moderna. The announcement led to " deep dissatisfaction " from EU member states, which "insisted on a precise delivery schedule," said European health commissioner

EU Health Commissioner Stella Kyriakides said there was ‘deep dissatisfaction’ at the news while Ireland’s Taoiseach Micheal Martin said it may have to slow its rollout.

The EU has come under fierce criticism for its laboured rollout of vaccines, with smaller nations accusing the bloc of failing to order enough doses.

According to the most recent data, France has given a first vaccine dose to just 1.4 people per 100, compared to 8.8 per 100 people in the UK.

a close up of a woman: EU Health Commissioner Stella Kyriakides (pictured) said there was ‘deep dissatisfaction’ at the news while Ireland’s Taoiseach Micheal Martin said it may have to slow its rollout © Provided by Daily Mail EU Health Commissioner Stella Kyriakides (pictured) said there was ‘deep dissatisfaction’ at the news while Ireland’s Taoiseach Micheal Martin said it may have to slow its rollout

Meanwhile, The Mail on Sunday can reveal that Matt Hancock was involved in a high-stakes, behind-the-scenes battle to stop President Trump’s administration from diverting supplies of the Oxford University vaccine to the US.

The drama took place in April when the university was in talks about joining with the US firm Merck & Co to manufacture the jab.

The talks broke down after the Health Secretary demanded a written guarantee that the US would not be given priority for the supplies – which was not forthcoming.

Several weeks later, Oxford signed a deal with AstraZeneca instead, helping to place Britain in the vanguard of global vaccine rollout rates.

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Rejected contracts and a Hollywood movie - how UK struck deal to guarantee vaccine supply .
As the row over vaccine supplies heated up this week, the UK government stuck to a simple line. © Reuters AstraZeneca partnered with Oxford - but it was close to being very different Ministers and officials repeatedly said they do not want conflict over vaccines. Yet, at the same time, they stated their confidence that they would get the doses they needed."We're very confident in our supplies, we're very confident in our contracts and we're going ahead on that basis," the prime minister declared on Wednesday. Behind the scenes, the message is the same.

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