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UK News Sunak is mocked for wearing 'teenage' flip-flop footwear in photoshoot

05:25  27 october  2021
05:25  27 october  2021 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

Rishi Sunak says booster jabs will prevent another lockdown

  Rishi Sunak says booster jabs will prevent another lockdown Rishi Sunak said whilst the winter would be 'challenging' for the NHS, he ruled out another lockdown and said the booster Covid jabs means the UK is now in a new phase of controlling virus.The Chancellor said the jabs will remain the government's 'first line of defence' in controlling the virus and stopping the NHS from becoming overwhelmed by the virus this winter.

Twitter users mocked Rishi Sunak last night for wearing £95 ' teenage ' flip - flop footwear in photoshoot . Chancellor put finishing touches to Budget while in socks and shoes made by fashion label Palm Angels. But social media users couldn't help but share memes of what they thought was his attempt to seem cool.

A young British Army soldier died after suffering a devastating head injury when the tank he was driving flipped during a training exercise, an inquest heard today. Private Jethro Watson-Pickering was behind the wheel of the armoured vehicle which was carrying two other soldiers when its gun barrel struck a tree. The soldiers were training in Salisbury Plain, Wilts, near the village of Enford on October 15 when the tank flipped . Army engineers reportedly had to cut trapped soldiers free from the overturned tank and Pte Watson-Pickering was pronounced dead at the scene and identified by a colleague

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Twitter users mocked Rishi Sunak last night for wearing £95 'teenage' flip-flop footwear in a pre-Budget pictures by photoshopping clown feet over the American-style sandals - while some pointedly suggested the 41-year-old Conservative 'act his age'.

In glossy photos released by the Treasury, the Chancellor put finishing touches to his Budget while in socks and sporting the shoes, made by fashion label Palm Angels. Sliders are similar to flip flops but without a central toe post, and popular with teenagers.

Another photo showed a can of Sprite and a Twix next to his red box - after the teetotal Chancellor said he would eat the sugary snacks as his 'pre-game routine' for the Budget. A third image showed him reading on the sofa with his red fox labrador puppy Nova.

Budget will focus on shoring up British economy after shock of coronavirus

  Budget will focus on shoring up British economy after shock of coronavirus Rishi Sunak said there was a move away from the reactionary measures to the pandemic that marked his first two budgets as Chancellor.Mr Sunak’s previous budgets in March 2021 and 2020 had been heavily focused on supporting the country through the coronavirus pandemic.

Rishi Sunak said more than seven million workers will get a pay rise in the Budget. The Chancellor announced the new Budget will award public sector employees. He also said the minimum wage will too rise to boost incomes of the lowest paid. Ministers refused to set a target for when the enormous NHS backlog would be cleared despite billions of pounds of fresh spending; Critics accused the Chancellor of driving a 'nail in the coffin' of high streets by delaying plans to overhaul business rates; Mr Sunak was berated by the Commons Speaker for briefing a slew of details in the run-up to tomorrow's

Mr Sunak will hail his Budget as ushering in a ‘new economy’ after the pandemic as he confirms billions of pounds for the NHS and wage rises for millions of workers. However, he will also stress the need for fiscal responsibility as he reveals a plan for bringing borrowing under control amid concerns about inflation and the threat of interest rate During his speech, Mr Sunak is expected to say: ‘Today’s Budget begins the work of preparing for a new economy post-Covid. An economy of higher wages, higher skills and rising productivity of strong public services, vibrant communities and safer streets.

But social media users couldn't help but share hilarious memes of what they thought was the Tory's attempt to seem cool - with one person sharing a video clip of actor Steve Buscemi trying to look young and asking 'how do you do, fellow kids?'.

Mr Sunak is expected to declare later that Britain is ready to enter a 'new age of optimism' and a 'post-Covid' economy as he is handed a Budget day growth boost.

Energy bills 'to rise £100 next year'

Energy bills will shoot up by at least £100 next year – or possibly £200 – because of the failure of suppliers, the boss of British Gas owner Centrica yesterday warned.

NHS and transport funding prioritised in pre-Budget announcements topping £30bn

  NHS and transport funding prioritised in pre-Budget announcements topping £30bn Spending has been detailed in numerous announcements over the weekend.Mr Sunak said his address to the Commons would focus on “looking to the future and building a stronger economy for the British people”.

Heidi seemed comfortable prancing around her hotel room wearing a pair of cheeky briefs to match a long-sleeve top as she practiced her poses with a trusty iPhone for Instagram snaps. Heidi was clearly in her element as she writhed around the room wearing a turtleneck crop top with long sleeves. Her sun-kissed skin took centerstage as she stood on her tippy toes to show off a pair of itty-bitty briefs which hung off her hips. Klum turned around to reveal the classic bikini bottoms were certainly revealing as she shared a clip to social media.

The camera then returned to Harper who was making the finishing touches to her shoe, with Victoria saying: 'Harper's heel is finished! Are we gonna eat it or are we gonna wear it?', before she filmed David stealing a piece of chocolate. Victoria later shared a duo of snaps showing her hugging Harper and Cruz and sporting a self-designed jumper and jeans combo.

A total of 16 energy suppliers have gone bust so far this year because of soaring wholesale gas prices. It has been predicted as many as 20 more will fail in the next few weeks. The price cap on tariffs means that energy companies are paying more for gas and electricity than what they are allowed to charge customers.

Centrica chief executive Chris O'Shea told the House of Lords yesterday that the shortfall would cost 'every single home in the UK' £100.

He added: 'It's not unreasonable to expect that to double in the next few weeks...'

Official forecasts, set to be updated today, are expected to show the economy is rebounding faster than predicted - allowing the Chancellor to splash more cash.

But the predictions will come with a sting in the tail as the threat of rising prices and worker shortages could put pressure on household finances.

Mr Sunak will hail his Budget as ushering in a 'new economy' after the pandemic as he confirms billions of pounds for the NHS and wage rises for millions of workers.

Sunak pledges £6bn to tackle record hospital waiting lists

  Sunak pledges £6bn to tackle record hospital waiting lists Rishi Sunak will pledge to invest £6bn in tackling NHS waiting lists across England and improving the use of digital technology in hospitals in the budget this week. The chancellor is set to announce £5.9bn in Wednesday's statement to reduce the backlog of non-emergency tests and procedures, with support for at least 100 'one-stop-shop' community diagnostic centres to assist those waiting for clinical tests such as MRIs, ultrasounds and CT scans.

Flip Flop in the snow. Driving in flats wearing pantyhose.

She paired it with pale grey trousers, and opted for black flip flops while going without socks. The Ghostbusters star carried a brown shoulder bag, and donned a pair of sunglasses. Cool: Sigourney looked casually chic for the outing, wearing a long-sleeved off-white top made from a weighty fabric. Appearing to go makeup free, Sigourney was fresh-faced, and wore her brunette hair down around her face. She also carried multiple paper bags from the fashion store, having made a large purchase.

However, he will also stress the need for fiscal responsibility as he reveals a plan for bringing borrowing under control amid concerns about inflation and the threat of interest rate rises.

During his speech, Mr Sunak is expected to say: 'Today's Budget begins the work of preparing for a new economy post-Covid. An economy of higher wages, higher skills and rising productivity of strong public services, vibrant communities and safer streets.

'An economy fit for a new age of optimism. That is the stronger economy of the future.'

The Office for Budget Responsibility will hand him upbeat forecasts, despite the looming threat of inflation. The easing of lockdown restrictions and the vaccine rollout mean the economy is in better shape than was expected at the time of the last Budget in March.

Growth forecasts for this year will be revised from 4 per cent to as high as 7.5 per cent – giving Mr Sunak more leeway to pump money into public services as he sets out spending plans for Whitehall departments for three years.

In the Budget today, Mr Sunak will confirm a rise of the minimum wage to £9.50 from April and the end of the pay freeze he imposed on public-sector workers.

Sir Lindsay Hoyle blasts Rishi Sunak over pre-Budget announcements

  Sir Lindsay Hoyle blasts Rishi Sunak over pre-Budget announcements Sir Lindsay Hoyle today stepped up his war of words with the Government as he blasted Rishi Sunak for making pre-Budget policy announcements. The Chancellor will deliver his eagerly awaited Budget tomorrow in front of MPs but the Treasury has set out numerous policies in the media ahead of the financial statement. That approach has prompted repeated rebukes from Sir Lindsay, who is adamant all policy announcements should be made to politicians first.

He will also unveil a further £5.9billion in capital funding to help the NHS clear the backlog created by Covid-19.

The Treasury has pledged green investment and policies to take advantage of post-Brexit freedoms and has touted nearly £7billion of new funding for local transport.

Mr Sunak will also set out new fiscal rules, which are expected to include a commitment to stop borrowing to fund day-to-day spending within three years.

It is thought he will also require government debt, running at about 100 per cent of gross domestic product, to start falling by 2025.

Office for National Statistics figures showed last week government borrowing was far lower than forecast in the first half of the fiscal year. The budget deficit was £108.1billion between April and September, almost 30 per cent below predictions. However, Mr Sunak will strike a note of caution about how servicing the debt could become much dearer if prices rise.

In March, he pointed out that a 1 per cent rise in interest rates and inflation would cost us over £25billion, adding: 'Over the medium term, we cannot allow debt to keep rising, and, given how high our debt now is, we need to pay close attention to affordability.'

Former Treasury minister David Gauke told Radio 4's the World At One yesterday: 'In the short term there is going to be some good news for the Chancellor as the economy has grown faster than projected.' But he added: 'There are still some real challenges.'

'Optimistic' Sunak gets Budget firepower thanks to UK growth upgrade

  'Optimistic' Sunak gets Budget firepower thanks to UK growth upgrade Rishi Sunak has a bit more money to deploy due to the strong bounceback from the pandemic - with the Office for Budget Responsibility expected to say UK plc will grow by 7 per cent this year.Below is a breakdown of some of the most notable funding pledges: 

Unions call for inflation-beating pay rises

Union bosses last night demanded that all public sector workers are given inflation-busting pay rises.

The Chancellor has confirmed he will scrap the Government's year-long pay freeze for taxpayer-funded roles in tomorrow's Budget. It paves the way for wage increases next year for around 5.7million workers including teachers, nurses, police and armed forces personnel.

But Mr Sunak has not set out how much wages will be boosted by. Business minister Paul Scully yesterday refused to guarantee the hikes would be above the level of inflation. 'That will be determined by the pay review bodies,' he told Sky News. No10 also declined to guarantee inflation-busting rises.

Tax burden to reach 70-year high as Sunak rebuilds after Covid-19

  Tax burden to reach 70-year high as Sunak rebuilds after Covid-19 Chancellor Rishi Sunak delivered a Budget with help for drinkers, businesses and the low paid.The Chancellor reaped the benefits of a stronger-than-expected recovery from the economic hit of Covid-19, using his Budget to set out increases in departmental spending and help for people on low incomes.

TUC general secretary Frances O'Grady said: 'We need a proper plan from the Chancellor tomorrow to get pay rising across the economy. That means a pay rise for all public sector workers that at least matches the cost of living.'

Shadow Chancellor Rachel Reeves urged Mr Sunak to 'take the pressure off working people'.

She added: 'Labour would ease the burden on households, cutting VAT on domestic energy bills immediately for six months, and we would not raise taxes on working people and British businesses while online giants get away without paying their fair share.'

However, the Chancellor was reprimanded by MPs over a slew of pre-Budget policy media briefings made by the   Treasury ahead of the financial statement.

That approach has prompted repeated rebukes from Commons Speaker Sir Lindsay Hoyle, who is adamant all policy announcements should be made to politicians first.

Sir Lindsay, who has made a point of rebuking ministers for making announcements outside the Commons, criticised ministers over the approach yesterday and did the same again this afternoon after more fiscal details were briefed.

The Commons Speaker accused Mr Sunak and the Treasury of treating Parliament in a 'discourteous manner' as he vowed to do everything in his power to ensure ministers answer MPs' questions.

Meanwhile, MPs on both sides of the chamber expressed their anger at the Government's communications strategy, accusing ministers of 'treating parliamentary democracy with utter contempt'.

It is the latest stand-off between the Speaker and ministers. In June, Prime Minister Boris Johnson agreed to make major Covid decisions to Parliament as well as to the nation on television after he was given a blunt telling off.

Sir Lindsay granted a second urgent question in two days to force Treasury ministers to appear in the Commons to answer questions on the forthcoming fiscal event.

Sunak praises 'world famous Burnley market' from 20 miles away in BURY

  Sunak praises 'world famous Burnley market' from 20 miles away in BURY The Chancellor travelled to Bury, now in Greater Manchester, to carry out a round of TV interviews. But speaking to the BBC he described his surroundings as the 'world famous Burnley market'.But Rishi Sunak appeared in need of a map to tell him whether he was in Bury or Burnley this morning.

He said the ministerial code states important announcements of Government policy should be made to Parliament first when it is in session.

Sir Lindsay told the Commons: 'I was disappointed to see more stories in the media today with apparently very well-briefed information about what will be in tomorrow's Budget.'

He accused the Government of treating the Commons in a 'discourteous manner', adding: 'This House will not be taken for granted, it's not right for everybody to be briefed, it's not more important to go on the news in the morning, it's more important to come here.'

Chief Secretary to the Treasury Simon Clarke defended the Government as he argued part of the objective in 'trailing specific aspects of the Budget in advance is to help communicate to the public what we're doing with their hard-earned money'.

Responding to a pre-Budget urgent question from Labour, he said: 'The ability of Parliament to scrutinise the Government, including the Budget, is clearly crucial which is why we've got five days of parliamentary debate ahead of us this week and next and why the the Chancellor will be appearing in addition in front of two select committees of this House next week.'

He said the 'bulk of the detail of the Budget' will be set out by Mr Sunak in the Commons tomorrow.

He added: 'Part of the Government's objective in trailing specific aspects of the Budget in advance is to help communicate to the public what we're doing with their hard-earned money because we believe there is merit in clear and accurate information.'

Mr Clarke faced criticism from both Labour and Tory MPs.

Conservative Julian Lewis asked the minister: 'Why is it important, right or necessary to share Budget information with the media before it is shared with this House where it can be subjected to proper scrutiny? And will he give an undertaking on behalf of the Treasury team to stop doing it?'

Labour's Angela Eagle added: 'This is treating parliamentary democracy with utter contempt, and the minister should be completely ashamed of himself, he should have come to this House and apologised, his boss should have come to this House and apologised.'

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Sunak praises 'world famous Burnley market' from 20 miles away in BURY .
The Chancellor travelled to Bury, now in Greater Manchester, to carry out a round of TV interviews. But speaking to the BBC he described his surroundings as the 'world famous Burnley market'.But Rishi Sunak appeared in need of a map to tell him whether he was in Bury or Burnley this morning.

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