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Ireland Fears for crisp supplies as drought conditions see potato stocks run low

09:15  06 july  2018
09:15  06 july  2018 Source:   independent.ie

Supplies already under pressure due to hot spell, Irish Water says

  Supplies already under pressure due to hot spell, Irish Water says Met Éireann said that temperatures will reach as high as 30 over the next few days. As status yellow weather warning is in place from 6am today until 9pm on Friday.Irish Water says that it’s drought management teams are monitoring water supplies and demand around the country on a daily basis.In the summer of 2017 Irish Water reported that an average of 565 mega-litres of water was used per day in the greater Dublin area.However, last Friday the area used 602 mega-litres of water, which is very close to the limit of sustainable production according to Irish Water.

FEARS are growing Britain could face a shortage of crisps after potato farmers were hit by severe weather. Potato farmer Andrew Francis, of Norfolk, told the paper he had “never seen such poor conditions ” than over the past Brits could bask in scorching heatwave until AUGUST as drought

Potato chips or crisps are thin slices of potato that have been deep fried or baked until crunchy. They are commonly served as a snack, side dish, or appetizer.

Tom Keogh at Keogh's farm and crisp factory in Oldtown, Co. Dublin. Photo: Douglas O'Connor © Provided by Irish Independent Tom Keogh at Keogh's farm and crisp factory in Oldtown, Co. Dublin. Photo: Douglas O'Connor

Tom Keogh of Keogh’s Crisps told FarmIreland that while there are still enough 2017 old potato reserves to keep crisp supplies afloat, he said if the hot and dry weather conditions continue for another two weeks, it will make supplies tight later in the year.

“As far as the 2017 crop is concerned everything is fine and we can use that up until late August. Potatoes that have been planted in April and May are a different story though. They’ve stopped growing because there’s so little moisture in the ground and we can only get water to 10pc of the crop,” he said.

Hosepipe ban on the cards as households face fines for wasting water amid drought fears

  Hosepipe ban on the cards as households face fines for wasting water amid drought fears HOUSEHOLDERS face being banned from using hosepipes to water their gardens or wash their cars under draconian tough measures being considered to avoid a national water shortage.The utility said it was closely monitoring supplies across 17 counties, with Dublin and Galway cities now at risk of having restrictions imposed, along with large towns including Westport in Mayo, Midleton in Cork and Ballinasloe in Galway.

Now CRISP shortage hits after Beast From The East and heatwave hammer Britain's potato crop. It comes as CO2 shortage has seen beer and fizzy drink supplies run out. Fears are growing the crisp could be the next food to be in short supply as Britain is hit by a produce 'crisis'.

Crisps could disappear from supermarket shelves amid fears of a shortage sparked by this year's Sub zero temperatures in February this year created dire conditions for British potatoes . Beer and fizzy drinks could run out in UK pubs and supermarkets next week due to supply crisis of CO2.

“It’s not looking good. If conditions carry on for the next two weeks, it’ll have a huge impact in late 2018 and will affect the whole country.”

Mr Keogh added that he feels yield will be so low that retailers will raise the price of potatoes and that it will be a struggle to import supplies from the UK as they are also enduring similar weather conditions.

“We’re estimating that yield will be so low that there won’t be enough to supply the market and that there may see an increase in retail prices. We’re not alone, the UK is experiencing the same drought conditions, so I’m mot sure where extra supply could come from,” he said.

At present Keoghs do not import any of their potatoes from the UK and only import a small percentage of baby potatoes from France. Mr Keogh feels that the market will have to be managed very carefully if Irish crisp suppliers are to feed the masses.

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  7 clever ways to save water during Ireland’s drought warning For those born after the 70’s, this is the first time we’ve truly experienced a proper extended heatwave in Ireland. It’s mad, it’s crazy, it’s great, it’s annoying, we can go swimming, we can’t sleep, we’re burned to a crisp, we’ve never been so full of Vitamin D… Yes, it’s been quite the rollercoaster. But […]It’s mad, it’s crazy, it’s great, it’s annoying, we can go swimming, we can’t sleep, we’re burned to a crisp, we’ve never been so full of Vitamin D…

Properties in Guildford, Surrey, saw their taps run dry and some schools in the town were also forced to close. Howden Reservoir in Derbyshire has been left severely drained amid supply issues in the area. Drought fears as UK suffers driest June and heatwave may last until AUGUST.

Potatoes start DYING when temperatures climb above 25 degrees - and Britain is sweltering at 28 degrees or more. Soon a bowl of crisps might be a rare site (Image: Getty). See more More Food & Health. Urgent recall: Nine supermarket soy sauces feared to contain GLASS.

“We’ve been increasing our acreage year-on-year so we’re hoping that’ll help us but if the dry weather continues it will be very tight and difficult for all crisp manufacturers to supply demand.”

With over 80 staff members and 400 acres of land, the Keogh family have been farming the land for over 200 years. They launched their range of crisps in 2011 and produce their products onsite in north County Dublin.  

Potatoes stop growing once it hits over 25c and while the Keoghs have seen warm conditions before, they've never seen it this dry.

The heatwave hasn't hindered crisps sales however, with their chorizo and cherry tomato flavour a hit among sun seekers so far. 

Ireland at risk of becoming a drought 'hotspot' warn climate change experts .
Ireland is liable to become a high-temperature hotspot over the next number of years and droughts may become more common, says Dr Conor Murphy from the Department of Geography at NUI Maynooth."At Dublin Airport, May and June were the two driest months in almost 168 years, with just 23.9mm of rainfall being recorded.

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