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Ireland'Propaganda' - Government dismisses reports Ireland faces food shortages and a bigger economic hit than Britain

13:40  07 december  2018
13:40  07 december  2018 Source:   independent.ie

Priti Patel: Use threats of food shortages to force Ireland to drop Brexit backstop

Priti Patel: Use threats of food shortages to force Ireland to drop Brexit backstop Priti Patel: Use threats of food shortages to force Ireland to drop Brexit backstop

The British government has negotiated a standstill transition period, during which trading ties would That said, he acknowledged that there could be big problems for exporters if — as is likely “But there could be some shortages and an erosion of choice.” For the government , there is one small silver

Food shortage is a serious problem facing the world and is prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa. The scarcity of food is caused by economic , environmental and social factors such as crop failure, overpopulation and poor government policies are the main cause of food scarcity in most countries.

'Propaganda' - Government dismisses reports Ireland faces food shortages and a bigger economic hit than Britain Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May with Taoiseach Leo Varadkar at Downing Street

REPORTS that Ireland faces food shortages and a drop in GDP of 7pc in the event of a no-deal Brexit have been dismissed as "propaganda".

Senior Government sources have roundly rejected leaked UK documents which show Ireland faces the risk of food shortages and a drop in GDP of 7pc in the event of a no deal Brexit.

A report in the Times UK has sparked a furious backlash, with critics accusing Brexiteers of using the threat of food shortages as ‘morally repugnant’.

A senior source described the material, which is described as a government document, as "propaganda" and suggested it emanated from the hardline Brexiteer ERG group.

Priti Patel: Use threats of food shortages to force Ireland to drop Brexit backstop

Priti Patel: Use threats of food shortages to force Ireland to drop Brexit backstop Priti Patel: Use threats of food shortages to force Ireland to drop Brexit backstop

The economy of Ireland is a knowledge economy , focused on services into high-tech, life sciences and financial services industries. Ireland is an open economy

Britain faces a 'perfect storm' of water shortage and lack of food , says the government 's chief scientist, and climate change and In Britain , a global food shortage would drive up import costs and make food more expensive, just as the nation's farmers start to feel the impact of disrupted rainfall

In relation to food shortages there may be some impacts to supply chain movement on the outcome of Brexit but there is contingency planning underway for all eventualities according to the source.

'Propaganda' - Government dismisses reports Ireland faces food shortages and a bigger economic hit than Britain © Catalyst Images A motorist crosses over the border from the Irish Republic into Northern Ireland near the town of Jonesborough, Northern Ireland, Monday, Jan. 30, 2017. The British Prime Minister Theresa May is due to meet the Irish Prime Minister Enda Kenny later Monday to discuss Britain leaving the EU. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison) Some Brexiteers, including Priti Patel  have called for the analysis to be used to pressure Ireland to drop the backstop but this has been rejected in Dublin.

Both the Taoiseach and senior EU figures including Jean Claude Juncker and Michel Barnier have been "absolutely clear the deal on the table is the deal and it's not up for renegotiation", the source said.

The UK government admits Brexit will inevitably leave Britain poorer

The UK government admits Brexit will inevitably leave Britain poorer The UK government release new economic assessments showing all Brexit outcomes will leave Britain worse off than remaining in the EU. The Chancellor Philip Hammond says that "purely from an economic point of view" it would be better to remain. However, he says May's deal would only leave Britain "very slightly" worse off. He says the government may have to reconsider leaving the Single Market if May's deal is defeated in Parliament. LONDON - Brexit will inevitably leave Britain worse off than had it remained in the EU, the UK Chancellor Philip Hammond said on Wednesday.

The government and the UN report that some 100,000 people are facing starvation, with a million more on the brink of famine caused by civil war and Aid agencies, including the UN World Food Programme, and the children’s fund Unicef, said that 4.9m people — more than 40 per cent of South

One in six countries in the world face food shortages this year because of severe droughts that could become semi-permanent under The food and agriculture organisation and the US government , both of which monitor global food shortages , agree that 34 countries are now experiencing droughts and

The suggestion has also come under fire in the UK with Scottish Prime Minister Nicola Sturgeon branding it as morally repugnant.

“The sheer moral bankruptcy of the Tory Brexiteers is on full display today,” she wrote on Twitter.

Fine Gael Senator Neale Richmond, the party’s European Affairs spokesperson, said the intervention came at a time when there is no scope for renegotiation.

“This is an extremely tense time in UK politics as the Withdrawal Bill makes its way through Westminster soliciting a wide range of actions,” he said.

'Propaganda' - Government dismisses reports Ireland faces food shortages and a bigger economic hit than Britain © Catalyst Images Anti-Brexit demonstrators protest outside the Houses of Parliament in London, Britain, November 26, 2018. REUTERS/Toby Melville “The fact of the matter is that there can be no Withdrawal Agreement without an Irish specific backstop, this is something the British Government has agreed to. There is not scope to renegotiate this.”

The UK’s Brexit legal advice says deal offers indefinite backstop

The UK’s Brexit legal advice says deal offers indefinite backstop An Irish border backstop instilled if there is a no-deal Brexit would continue to apply ‘unless and until it is superseded’ by a new agreement. The UK Government has published the legal advice it has received on the Brexit withdrawal agreement made with the EU, following sustained pressure on Theresa May. The 43-page Legal Position On The Withdrawal Agreement was published after the government lost a parliamentary vote.

The report projected that during the 2010s transfers to local authorities would fall by 64% and that spending on Reductions in benefit support and a shortage of affordable housing were considered to be times in the past 12 months when you did not have enough money to buy food that you or your

Venezuelans have faced shortages before, so rehashing old strategies such as substituting rice The Food and Agriculture Organisation has said that the Latin American nation more than halved "Part of me leaves the shop gleaming like I've hit the jackpot," he says. "As if finding food was a matter of luck."

The “extreme rhetoric” from arch Brexiteers was based on a belief “that they alone can deliver something else and they can split European solidarity to achieve this. Neither is achievable”, he said.

“What is on offer is this deal, no deal or indeed no Brexit. The negotiations on the Withdrawal Agreement have ended,” he added.

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