•   
  •   

IrelandIrish Coast Guard staff and volunteers no longer allowed to use blue lights and sirens

07:45  20 february  2019
07:45  20 february  2019 Source:   thejournal.ie

Man dies after being plucked from water off Donegal coast

Man dies after being plucked from water off Donegal coast The man's name has not yet been released until al family members have been notified .

Irish Coast Guard vehicles are fitted with blue lights and sirens , similar to those on other emergency vehicles across the country. It stated that in order to “manage this risk”, drivers are no longer permitted to use blue lights and sirens while driving on public roads.

Staff and volunteers with the Irish Coast Guard saved 161 lives so far this year. The Coast Guard , which is a division of the Department of Transport, saw The spokesperson said the issue of training volunteers and full-time staff to drive with blue lights and sirens is being addressed in the Coast

Irish Coast Guard staff and volunteers no longer allowed to use blue lights and sirens © Irish Coast Guard via Facebook

IRISH COAST GUARD staff and volunteers have been told they are no longer permitted to use blue lights and sirens on vehicles while driving.

In a directive issued to staff, and seen by TheJournal.ie, the Coast Guard told members the risks associated with driving blue light vehicles on public roads “need to be mitigated” for the safety of volunteers and the public.

Now staff and volunteers are worried about the potential delays this will cause when they are travelling to incidents. There is also concern that they have not been told of any plans to provide training in this area.

Suspended assistant garda commissioner suing Irish Times and Irish Daily Star

Suspended assistant garda commissioner suing Irish Times and Irish Daily Star John Fintan Fanning’s bid to be reinstated to his job is due to be heard by the High Court again today.

THE IRISH COAST Guard is to lift its controversial ban on blue light and siren driving for some volunteers as it rolls out training. Last month a directive was issued to staff and volunteers informing them that they were only permitted to use the lights on their emergency vehicles when

The Irish Coast Guard is part of the Department of Transport of the Republic of Ireland. The primary roles of the Coast Guard include maritime safety and search and rescue.

In 2018 Irish Coast Guard volunteer units conducted over 1,100 missions and saved more than 400 lives. The service is responsible for handling maritime emergencies and is called to reports of people in the water, falls on coastal areas as well as threats of self harm, among other incidents.

The three rescue coordination centres managed 2,650 incidents last year. The helicopter services flew in excess of 670 missions including 119 on behalf of the HSE, more than 100 medical missions from the islands to the mainland and eight long range medical evacuations. Coast Guard vehicles are often used by volunteers who are assisting with these medical missions.

Irish Coast Guard vehicles are fitted with blue lights and sirens, similar to those on other emergency vehicles across the country. Though drivers were not permitted to use high speeds or break red lights, they were allowed to use the lights and sirens to alert other road users of their presence so they could clear a way through a road.

Coast Guard Officer Accused of Racist Mass-Murder Plot, Kept ‘Hit List’ of Democrats and MSNBC Hosts

Coast Guard Officer Accused of Racist Mass-Murder Plot, Kept ‘Hit List’ of Democrats and MSNBC Hosts Coast Guard Officer Accused of Racist Mass-Murder Plot, Kept ‘Hit List’ of Democrats and MSNBC Hosts

Irish Coast Guard staff and volunteers no longer allowed to use blue lights and sirens . In 2018 Irish Coast Guard volunteer units conducted over 1,100 missions and saved more than 400 lives. The service is responsible for handling maritime emergencies and is called to reports of people in the

A spokesperson for the Coast Guard said it relates to "a safety instruction" issued to its volunteers over the use of blue lights and sirens on public "They are not allowed to break speed limits. The Irish Coast Guard handles approximately 2,500 marine emergencies a year and assists some 4,500

In 2015, the Emergency Services Driving Standard (ESDS) initiative – a voluntary code for emergency service drivers, including Coast Guard drivers, which is endorsed by the Road Safety Authority – was developed.

The code has three training levels – only the highest permitting the use of blue lights and sirens. The directive issued to staff and volunteers this month stated that it is “imperative” that the Coast Guard implements this policy, as other emergency organisations have.

The directive outlined how there is a ‘risk’ associated with not following the policy. It stated that in order to “manage this risk”, drivers are no longer permitted to use blue lights and sirens while driving on public roads. They can however use them when they are parked up.

The directive acknowledges that this is “a significant change” to what staff and volunteers may have been doing on the public roads up until this point.

Islamic terror suspects will be allowed home

Islamic terror suspects will be allowed home Ireland will take back extremists who have travelled to fight with terrorist groups like Isil, Taoiseach Leo Varadkar has said. While he indicated each case would have to be considered on its own merits, Mr Varadkar said this country shouldn’t expect our citizens “to be somebody else’s problem”. An estimated half-dozen Irish passport holders are believed to be still operating on behalf of Islamic State (Isil) in Syria. Senior Garda security and intelligence officers reckon that many of the 30 suspects, who left here to join foreign fighters in Syria and Iraq, are now dead.

Staff and volunteers were informed that while drivers are no longer permitted to use blue lights and sirens while driving on public roads, they can The Coast Guard HQ are claiming that this is about safety concerns and risks for the drivers and the general public, but if a volunteer is trying to make

Irish Coast Guard staff and volunteers no longer allowed to use blue lights and sirens Exclusive. Crews are being told to use Dublin Airport for transfers to Beaumont Hospital, adding up to 20 minutes onto the journey for the patient.

Provision of training

Sources told TheJournal.ie the directive has caused controversy in the organisation and volunteers are concerned that they could end up stuck in traffic on the way to life-threatening incidents as other road users will not know to move out of their way.

One said it will have “a very serious impact on operations”.

“It’s not about blasting around on lights on sirens, it’s about making progression safely and this will stop unit’s getting to incidents in a timely fashion,” they explained.

Any unit in an urban area will be severely hampered by this. Response times will be very long with traffic on any sort of decent day or weekend, which is the likely times to get a call. People didn’t join to spend all the time training to sit in traffic and never make it to the scene to actually help the people that are in need.

Sources also pointed out that the directive made no mention of providing training so that this policy could be in-part reversed.

For years the representative organisations for garda members have been raising similar concerns about the restricted use of blue lights and sirens.

Investigation underway after man dies in workplace accident in Enniskeane, Co Cork

Investigation underway after man dies in workplace accident in Enniskeane, Co Cork Investigation underway after man dies in workplace accident in Enniskeane, Co Cork that occurred at approximately 8:30am on 26th February 2019. "A man in his 50s man was fatally injured in the incident. The body of the man remains at the scene and the Health and Safety Authority have been notified." NOW READ: Islamic terror suspects will be allowed home (Independent.

Irish Coast Guard staff and volunteers no longer allowed to use blue lights and sirens Exclusive. Feb 20th 2019, 12:05 AM 83,486 Views 61 Comments. Volunteers are worried about the potential delays this will cause when they are travelling to incidents.

Irish Coast Guard staff and volunteers no longer allowed to use blue lights and sirens Exclusive. Feb 20th 2019, 12:05 AM 83,488 Views 61 Comments. Reports today suggested that nine of 52 staff would lose their jobs under new plans but the department said today this is not the case.

Gardaí are required to complete what is known as CBD2 training, which allows them to pursue vehicles at high speeds as well as the use of lights and sirens. But the numbers of gardaí being trained to this level dropped significantly during recessionary years and has failed to recover.

A Garda Inspectorate report published just before Christmas found that over 80% of  gardaí are not trained to drive with lights and sirens.

Irish Coast Guard staff and volunteers no longer allowed to use blue lights and sirens © Garda Inspectorate

Members have said this interferes significantly with their operational duties. In one incident reported by TheJournal.ie, a suspected drink driver was able to evade detection because the garda member driving the patrol car did not have this training.

The first patrol car on the scene of the Regency Hotel shooting in 2016 were also not trained for this driving. Gardaí risk disciplinary action if they breach procedure.

Similarly, disciplinary action is threatened for any breaches in the use of lights and sirens in procedure docume

ntation for the Irish Coast Guard.

A spokesperson for the Coast Guard said told TheJournal.ie that this latest instruction was issued as “a clarification in relation to the existing position as regards their use while driving on public roads”.

The policy mirrors best practice in other principal emergency services for untrained “blue-light” drivers. This notice in no way impacts on the Coast Guard’s status as a principal emergency service.

'Significant concerns' over infection control at Cork hospital following two superbug outbreaks

'Significant concerns' over infection control at Cork hospital following two superbug outbreaks 'Significant concerns' over infection control at Cork hospital following two superbug outbreaks

Irish Coast Guard staff and volunteers no longer allowed to use blue lights and sirens . Even where light rainfall had been forecast in Munster over the past few days the rainfall has evaporated before contact with ground levels, we term this as "Virga".

The Coast Guard directive states that staff and volunteers are now banned from using blue lights and sirens when making their way to emergency They are not allowed to break speed limits. This is about saving lives.” Senator Grace O’Sullivan is Green Party Spokesperson on Environmental

The Citizen’s Information Service describes principal emergency services as “the first services to respond to most major services”.

“They are the blue light services that respond to normal emergencies, that is, the Garda Síochána, the Ambulance Service and the Fire Service. A fourth principal emergency service, the Irish Coast Guard, is responsible for handling maritime emergencies in Ireland’s territorial waters, harbours and coastline.”

The department spokesperson said the risks associated with driving blue-light vehicles on public roads have been discussed with volunteers around the coast for some time, including at sectoral meetings and conferences.

“These risks need to be mitigated – particularly in terms of the safety of the volunteers, other road users and members of the public.”

The spokesperson said the issue of training volunteers and full-time staff to drive with blue lights and sirens is being addressed in the Coast Guard’s safety and risk work plan but no date was provided for its completion or the roll-out of training.

NOW READ:

Young woman, 27, killed when buggy flipped over in a field (Independent.ie)

Karl Lagerfeld, the designer who defined luxury fashion, dies at 85 (The New York Times)

Bernie Sanders is running for president again. This time, he’s a frontrunner (Vox)

Read more

Mystery Tracks Discovered at Bottom of Great Blue Hole.
A team of explorers dove over 400 feet into the Great Blue Hole in November and December 2018.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!