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IrelandRecovery operation for missing Séamus Lawless may not go ahead due to safety concerns

09:35  20 may  2019
09:35  20 may  2019 Source:   msn.com

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A recovery operation of an Irish father-of-one who fell from the world’s highest mountain may not go ahead due to safety concerns , a © Provided by Trinity Mirror Shared Services Limited Seamus Lawless . The search operation has now been confirmed by the Seven Summits Treks company and

The search for the Wicklow man missing on Mount Everest won't resume until late next week. “If any type of search, rescue and recovery operation is planned it will not go ahead if it is too dangerous Sherpas, who are absolute experts in their field and go out of their way to recover injured and fatally

Recovery operation for missing Séamus Lawless may not go ahead due to safety concerns © Irish Mirror Seamus Lawless

A recovery operation of an Irish father-of-one who fell from the world’s highest mountain may not go ahead due to safety concerns, a leading adventurer and mountaineer believes.

Twice Mount Everest summiteer Pat Falvey, who scaled the Himalayan mountain on two occasions, said it remains unclear how Séamus ‘Shay’ Lawless, from Bray, Co Wicklow fell some 500 metres as he was descending from the 8,848 metres summit.

The assistant professor in artificial intelligence at Trinity College’s School of Computer Science and Statistics, had successfully reached the summit last Thursday along with several others in his group of eight, led by well known Co Down adventurer Noel Hanna – just hours before he went missing.

Search called off for Irish dad Seamus Lawless who fell while descending Mount Everest

Search called off for Irish dad Seamus Lawless who fell while descending Mount Everest Seamus Lawless was fulfilling a life-long dream of reaching the summit of Mount Everest , which stands at 8,848 metres, before he reached his 40th birthday in July this year. The assistant professor in artificial intelligence at Trinity’s School of Computer Science and Statistics, had successfully reached the summit on Thursday along with several others in his group of eight led by world-renowned Co Down adventurer Noel Hanna - just hours before his fall.

Recovery operation for missing Séamus Lawless may not go ahead due to safety concerns . Arsenal news : Chelsea suffer HUGE injury blow ahead of Europa League final with Arsenal. Chelsea take on Arsenal in Baku on May 29 but Kante faces a race to be fit in time.

Seamus Lawless , 39, went missing after he reportedly fell from an altitude of 8,300 metres on Thursday morning. The married dad-of-one had been following a lifelong dream to scale the world's highest Recovery operation for missing Séamus Lawless may not go ahead due to safety

Mr Falvey, who runs his business, Pat Falvey Adventures from his base in Kerry, said that over the next few days more information surrounding what exactly happened to Mr Lawless will be answered but that “a lot of questions currently remain.

The Cork native, was the first person in the world to complete the Seven Summits twice by climbing Mount Everest from its north and south sides.

Recovery operation for missing Séamus Lawless may not go ahead due to safety concerns © Provided by Trinity Mirror Shared Services Limited Seamus Lawless

The search operation has now been confirmed by the Seven Summits Treks company and by Mr Falvey as a recovery operation.

“If any type of search, rescue and recovery operation is planned it will not go ahead if it is too dangerous to do so. Paying to put the lives at risk such as the sherpas should not happen if weather conditions are not conducive to do so.

Trinity College to hold candlelit vigil for missing professor Seamus Lawless as fundraising campaign raises over €100,000 in under a day

Trinity College to hold candlelit vigil for missing professor Seamus Lawless as fundraising campaign raises over €100,000 in under a day Seamus Lawless went missing after he reportedly fell from an altitude of 8,300 metres on Thursday morning . The married dad-of-one had been following a lifelong dream to scale the world's highest peak while raising €25,000 for children's charity Barretstown. © Microsoft ICE DO NOT EDIT THIS DOCUMENT Seamus Lawless and Jenny Copeland on one of their earlier treks in training for the climb The Bray man's colleagues will hold the vigil in the Long Room Hub from 8:15pm.

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“Sherpas, who are absolute experts in their field and go out of their way to recover injured and fatally wounded climbers despite the extraordinary dangers, would do so without being paid.

“A lot of questions need to be asked as to how Mr Lawless fell. From what I’m being told from the experts in Nepal is that he was only missed when Mr Hanna went looking for him after they had descended down from summit to the nearest camp. Climbing was treacherous as there is little sun on that side of the mountain. It would be a massive task to bring him down from the balcony area where he was last seen.

“Normally, a climber has fixed ropes attached to them and is accompanied by a sherpa in a type of one-on-one situation.

“The fundraising campaign launched to help to locate Mr Lawless is to be commended. Unfortunately no insurance company would sponsor you in the event of having a fatal injury.

Search for missing Seamus Lawless will resume in two days

Search for missing Seamus Lawless will resume in two days The search for missing Irish man Seamus Lawless will resume in two days. The Trinity College professor went missing as he climbed Mount Everest. Seamus, 39, fell as he descended the peak on Thursday having just achieved a lifetime ambition of reaching the summit. 

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“It is an unwritten rule in mountaineering and especially in dangerous areas, that remains are often left there as a sign of respect to the person, the sherpas and the mountain.

Recovery operation for missing Séamus Lawless may not go ahead due to safety concerns © Provided by Trinity Mirror Shared Services Limited Seamus Lawless

“It could take weeks for fresh sherpas to carry out a recovery operation.

“There are still 700 people waiting to summit Everest but weather conditions for the past week have been horrendous and it is only now that they are starting to slowly improve. The winds alone would zap your energy. So much is stacked against you. It could be weeks before any type of a recovery operation could take place.

“Throughout the past week high winds of 55km and frigid temperatures of -27C with a wind chill, making it feel more like -43C have been persistent.

Meanwhile, Tánaiste and Foreign Affairs Minister Simon Coveney speaking on RTÉ’s This Week radio programme said that he had spoken several times to Mr Lawless’s wife Pamela and committed to providing as much help as his Department can. “She (Pamela) is a remarkable woman and we will continue to help her.”

Search resumes for Trinity College professor Seamus Lawless who is missing on Mount Everest

Search resumes for Trinity College professor Seamus Lawless who is missing on Mount Everest The team is being led by Irish mountaineer Noel Hanna . Hanna will lead the team to Base Camp IV of the world's highest peak this evening. A search of the mountain's death zone will begin on Thursday morning, reports the Himalayan Times. The team consists of eight high-altitude Sherpa climbers, including lead guide Temba Bhote. Hanna and Bhote reached the summit of Everest with Lawless last Thursday. The Bray man is reported to have slipped while descending from the summit point later that day. A GoFundMe page set up to help pay for the costs of the search has already raised over €250,000.

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Mr Hanna has experienced another tragedy in his climbing career. In 2011, he was part of a team involved in another Everest summit attempt, where another Irishman and father-of-two John Delaney, 41, from Kilcock, Co Kildare died 50 metres from the Everest summit.

His body remains on the mountain.

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usr: 1
This is interesting!