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US News Panic ensues after false alarm warns of incoming ballistic missile threat to Hawaii

23:00  13 january  2018
23:00  13 january  2018 Source:   businessinsider.com.au

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HAWAII NUCLEAR ATTACK FALSE ALARM CAUSES PANIC - Duration: 11:50. Panic in Hawaii as residents receive warning of ' incoming ballistic missile threat ' - Duration: 1:11.

Officials said quickly after that the alert went out by mistake and was a false alarm . The Hawaii Emergency Management Agency tweeted, "NO missile threat to Hawaii ." There is absolutely no incoming ballistic missile threat to Hawaii right now."

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Watch: Hawaii Missile Threat Quickly Ruled False Alarm (Provided by Wochit)

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An early-morning emergency alert mistakenly warning of an incoming ballistic missile attack was dispatched to cellphones across Hawaii on Saturday, setting off widespread panic in a state that was already on edge because of escalating tensions between the United States and North Korea.

People in Hawaii panicked when they got an emergency alert on their phones warning of an incoming ballistic missile threat . Officials quickly confirmed afterward that the alert was a false alarm and had been sent out by mistake.

People in Hawaii were sent into a panic Saturday morning when they got an emergency alert on their phones that said, "Ballistic missile threat inbound to Hawaii. Seek immediate shelter. This is not a drill."

Officials said quickly after that the alert went out by mistake and was a false alarm.

The Hawaii Emergency Management Agency tweeted, "NO missile threat to Hawaii."

Lt. Commander Joe Nawrocki of the North American Aerospace Defence Command, the agency in charge of providing aerospace warnings in North America, told BuzzFeed News, "There is no missile threat. We're trying to figure out where this came from or how this started. There is absolutely no incoming ballistic missile threat to Hawaii right now."

"My phone's blowing up right now," Nawrocki added.

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  Hawaii's false missile threat: Worker 'feels terrible' after pushing the wrong button Hawaii emergency officials confirmed Saturday evening that an alert about an inbound ballistic missile was a mistake, which a state emergency official attributed to someone pushing the wrong button.Vern Miyagi, who oversees the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency (EMA), said at a news conference late Saturday that the civil defense employee who pushed the wrong button regrets what took place.

People in Hawaii panicked when they got an emergency alert on their phones warning of an incoming ballistic missile threat . Officials quickly confirmed afterward that the alert was a false alarm and had been sent out by mistake.

We’re trying to figure out where this came from or how this started. There is absolutely no incoming ballistic missile threat to Hawaii right now.” NOW WATCH: A Navy SEAL explains why you should end a shower with cold water. Source: BusinessInsider Panic ensues after false alarm warns of

a screenshot of a cell phone © Provided by Business Insider Inc Rep. Tulsi Gabbard and Sen. Brian Schatz, both of whom represent Hawaii, said on Twitter that alert was a false alarm.

"What happened today is totally inexcusable," Schatz later added. "The whole state was terrified. There needs to be tough and quick accountability and a fixed process."

A Hawaii EMA spokesman also told BuzzFeed News that they were in the process of sending another message to cancel the initial alert.

"It was part of a drill that was going on," they said.

The second alert went out about 45 minutes later.

"There is no missile threat or danger to the State of Hawaii. Repeat. False alarm," the message said.

Twitter users were in a frenzy as the situation unfolded.

Hawaii began testing its nuclear warning system in December, CNN reported. It was the first time since the Cold War that Hawaii reinstituted the practice, and it comes as the US sees heightening tensions with North Korea, which has increased its nuclear aggression in recent months.

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Hawaii governor took long to post on Twitter about missile alert because he forgot username, password .
Gov. David Ige says he and his team took so long to post a message to social media about the recent missile alert being a false alarm because he didn't know his Twitter username and password. Ige told reporters Monday he's since put his username and password into his cellphone. He says he can now use social media without waiting for his staff.The governor was asked why his Twitter account relayed a Hawaii Emergency Management Agency tweet about the false alarm at 8:24 a.m. on Jan. 13 even though Ige learned about the mistake 15 minutes earlier at 8:09 a.m. © AP Hawaii Gov.

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