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US News Swarms of jellyfish descend on beaches in heatwave

14:05  03 july  2018
14:05  03 july  2018 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

Temperature warning issued as we get ready for a heatwave this week

  Temperature warning issued as we get ready for a heatwave this week Met Éireann have issued a Status Yellow temperature warning.Met Éireann said that temperatures will go as high as 27 degrees today in some places, and could go even higher over the next few days. The weather warning is in place from 6am today until 9pm on Friday.

BRITAIN’S heatwave is luring deadly Portuguese man o’ war to the nation’s sun-baked beaches as the school holidays approach, experts have warned. It’s prompted The Marine Conservation Society to warn that the rise in the number of jellyfish around the British coast “can no longer be ignored”.

The tentacled invaders could lead to beaches on the sunny shores being shut down as a freak conditions drive to the poisonous jellies to the Spanish resorts. Jellyfish have descended on the Mediterranean coast of the Costas before and resulted more than a thousand beachgoers being stung

A lion's mane jellyfish spotted by Ann Dunne in Ireland as swarms of powerful jellyfish are descending on beaches in the British Isles © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited A lion's mane jellyfish spotted by Ann Dunne in Ireland as swarms of powerful jellyfish are descending on beaches in the British Isles

Swarms of powerful jellyfish are descending on beaches in the British Isles as it remains gripped by a heatwave.

While the sea creatures are no stranger to UK waters, sightings of the infamous lion's mane species have rocketed as our seas begin to warm up.

Lion's mane jellyfish can grow longer than a blue whale, and have the most severe sting of any jellyfish species found in British waters, often leaving their victims hospitalised.

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  Gritters deployed to protect roads amid heatwave Some roads have become so hot that they have started to melt and stick to tyres. There's not a snowflake in sight, but our gritters are out and about today. They're spreading granite dust onto roads affected by the heat. #NotGritting #LancsSummer pic.twitter.com/O1B84HZYWa— Lancashire County Council (@LancashireCC) June 27, 2018Crushed rock particles are being spread by councils to create a non-stick layer between roads and vehicles.Local authorities in Cumbria, Lancashire, Doncaster and Hampshire are among those using gritters this week.

For years we have been told that jellyfish are growing in numbers and will swarm the oceans. But this may not be true. For the last decade there have been regular reports of jellyfish invading beaches across the world.

While trying to swim from Cuba to Florida, Diana Nyad swims right into a swarm of deadly jellyfish . #MonsterWeek Monster Week STARTS THURSDAY 9/8C Join us

water next to the ocean: A lion's mane jellyfish spotted by Lindsey Becket at Kames Bay on the Isle of Cumbrae in Scotland © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited A lion's mane jellyfish spotted by Lindsey Becket at Kames Bay on the Isle of Cumbrae in Scotland

And the venomous creatures have become more commonplace in recent years, with global warming making our ocean environment a more attractive location for them.

Dr Peter Richardson, head of ocean recovery at the Marine Conservation Society, said: 'Our national survey suggests significant recent rises in the numbers of some jellyfish species in UK seas, most notably the barrel jellyfish.

'The million-dollar question is why this is happening? At the moment we just don't know.'

a close up of an animal: This barrel jellyfish was spotted by Mark Turner at Rhossili Beach in Swansea, South Wales © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited This barrel jellyfish was spotted by Mark Turner at Rhossili Beach in Swansea, South Wales

Sightings of lion's manes in Blackpool, Anglesey and Galway follow the mass stranding of hundreds of barrel jellyfish in Weymouth, Dorset, last week. The creatures can grow up to 35in (90cm) wide and weigh as much as 55lbs (25kg).

Some of the most gorgeous pictures of Ireland during the heatwave

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Swarms of jellyfish have descended on Egypt's northern coast. Painful: Stinging nomad jellyfish , which gather in huge swarms , are invading the beaches of Israel and the eastern Mediterranean.

Thousands of jellyfish have washed up on beaches in Pembrokeshire and Ceredigion in what a conservationist has described as a "mega swarm ". More than 300 barrel jellyfish washed up in New Quay, Ceredigion.

With 6ft (1.8m) tentacles hanging beneath them, they are capable of delivering a powerful sting even after they have been washed up.

Several of the gelatinous creatures were washed onto beaches along the west coast of Lancashire last month - including in Blackpool - while large numbers were spotted in Hythe, Kent, at the weekend and some swimmers even received stings.

a close up of a dog: A lion's mane jellyfish spotted by Charlie Farrell in Anglesey, Wales © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited A lion's mane jellyfish spotted by Charlie Farrell in Anglesey, Wales

Three were hospitalised after they were stung by lion's manes in Galway, Ireland, during the hot weather last month. One woman was stung on the face, leading to the lifeguard on duty raising the red flag warning people not to enter the water.

Ten of the creatures were spotted floating in coastal waters by one member of a triathlon group during a 2.5-mile (4km) swim in Galway Bay.

Jellyfish are most commonly found in warm, shallow waters close to beaches. Most species found in the UK can only deliver a mild sting.

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  Ireland weather forecast: Ireland could get hottest day in 40 years as temperature map shows 33C heatwave next week Some weather models are showing 33C could be recorded in Ireland next weekAs the heatwave continues, some weather models are showing record-breaking temperatures from mid-week.

There are fears the creatures will soon swarm the UK’s baking beaches thanks to the heatwave sweeping the nation. Hundreds of barrel jellyfish , which are not as fearsome as the man o’ war but can still sting swimmers, have washed up on beaches such as Weymouth in Dorset.

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Video: Don't pee on it! Here's how you treat a jellyfish sting (USA Today)

However if you see them collected together in large clusters known as blooms, it is advised to exit the water as soon as possible.

If you are stung, leave the water and carefully remove any stingers with tweezers before covering the affected area with vinegar or soaking in hot water.

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Plague of vampire horseflies infest heatwave Britain bringing the threat of drug-resistant infections, experts warn .
The recent heatwave has seen populations of bloodsucking clegs – or horseflies – reach Mediterranean levels, Antibiotic Research UK (ANTRUK) said. Females feed off blood, with the charity warning that bites could result in painful swellings and the possibility of infections which might not be treatable with existing antibiotics. It said, while the majority of small but nonetheless painful insect bites and stings can be treated at home with over-the-counter medication, itchy horsefly bites take longer to heal and can become infected, especially if scratched.

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