US News: Pilot of Crashed Jet Reported Flight-Control Problems - PressFrom - United Kingdom
  •   
  •   

US NewsPilot of Crashed Jet Reported Flight-Control Problems

18:25  13 march  2019
18:25  13 march  2019 Source:   msn.com

Irish person among 157 killed after Ethiopian Airlines flight crashes shortly after leaving Addis Ababa Airport

Irish person among 157 killed after Ethiopian Airlines flight crashes shortly after leaving Addis Ababa Airport A statement from the airline has confirmed one Irish person was on board the aircraft which was described as a "brand new" Boeing 737 . The Department of Foreign Affairs have been contacted for comment. © Flight radar Flight radar The airline said the flight took off at 8.38am and lost contact six minutes later, crashing near the city of Bishoftu less than 40 miles to the southeast of Addis Ababa. Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed offered condolences to the families of those who had been lost.

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia—The pilot of the Ethiopian Airlines jet that crashed Sunday reported that he was having flight - control problems and wanted to return to the airport, but didn’t indicate any other technical faults or other difficulties during the jet ’s short ascent, according to the carrier’s chief.

The pilot of Ethiopian Airlines flight 302 told controllers he was having control problems before the Boeing jet crashed , according to an account of Although no evidence has yet linked the crashes , pilots reported problems on both planes moments after takeoff and asked to make emergency

Slideshow by Photo Services

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia—The pilot of the Ethiopian Airlines jet that crashed Sunday reported that he was having flight-control problems and wanted to return to the airport, but didn’t indicate any other technical faults or other difficulties during the jet’s short ascent, according to the carrier’s chief.

In an interview with The Wall Street Journal, Chief Executive Tewolde Gebremariam declined to discuss the flight or the crash investigation further, but said the conversation between the pilot and ground control didn’t point to any external issues, like a bird collision, that might help investigators narrow the possible causes. The pilot “reported back to air-traffic controllers that he was having flight-control problems” and wanted to return to Addis Ababa, Mr. Gebremariam said.

The few details about the pilot’s communication come as pressure mounts on Boeing Co., the maker of the 737 MAX 8 that crashed, killing all 157 aboard. The crash happened less than five months after another 737 MAX 8, operated by Indonesia’s Lion Air, crashed in the Java Sea in October, killing 189 people.

Ethiopian Airlines Black Boxes Showed 'Clear Similarities' With Lion Air Crash

Ethiopian Airlines Black Boxes Showed 'Clear Similarities' With Lion Air Crash Data retrieved from the black boxes of a crashed Ethiopian Airlines plane showed similarities to that from the Lion Air flight that plunged into the Java Sea in October, Ethiopia’s transport minister said Sunday, adding to the pressure on aircraft maker Boeing Co. “Clear similarities were noted between Ethiopian Air Flight 302 and Indonesian Lion Air Flight 610, which will be the subject of further study during the investigation,” Transport Minister Dagmawit Moges said. Both flights were on Boeing 737 MAX 8 aircraft.

The pilots of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 reported to air traffic control that they were having “ flight control problems ” in the moments before the crash , the That crash raised concerns about the plane’s flight control systems.CreditEd Wray/Getty Images. Boeing plans changes to plane’s control

JAKARTA (Reuters) - A Lion Air jet that crashed into the sea off Indonesia last month was not in a safe condition on its second-to-last flight, when pilots A preliminary report unveiled fresh details of efforts by pilots to steady the jet as they reported a “ flight control problem ”, including the captain’s last

In the Indonesian crash, investigators are focusing on flight-control issues during its 11 minutes in the air, as well as probing maintenance and the actions of the plane’s pilots. Investigators are still months from a final conclusion.

The general similarities between the two crashes—both involved brand new MAX 8s that went down shortly after takeoff—have prompted increased scrutiny of the jet. Boeing has stood by the safety of the plane in the face of a wave of global groundings, passenger unease and calls by flight crew unions and American politicians to consider parking the jet.

Related video: Boeing making changes to stall-prevention system on 737 MAX

Boeing said it is working on a fix to address some of the flight-control issues raised by the Lion Air crash. The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration reiterated Tuesday that the aircraft is safe, and no American operator has grounded the plane. “Our review shows no systemic performance issues and provides no basis to order grounding the aircraft,” the agency said. U.S. carriers, sticking by the FAA guidance, have said they have no plans to ground flights.

The U.S. is one of just a few taking that stance. The European Union, China and a handful of other countries and airlines have grounded the jet, idling most of the global fleet, which numbers more than 370.

Apart from a growing reputational crisis, Boeing faces mounting commercial pressure, too. Lion Air said Wednesday it had asked Boeing to delay deliveries of new MAX jets until the Indonesian investigation concludes later this year.

Pilot Who Hitched a Ride Saved Lion Air 737 Day Before Deadly Crash

Pilot Who Hitched a Ride Saved Lion Air 737 Day Before Deadly Crash As the Lion Air crew fought to control their diving Boeing Co. 737 Max 8, they got help from an unexpected source: an off-duty pilot who happened to be riding in the cockpit. That extra pilot, who was seated in the cockpit jumpseat, correctly diagnosed the problem and told the crew how to disable a malfunctioning flight-control system and save the plane, according to two people familiar with Indonesia’s investigation. The next day, under command of a different crew facing what investigators said was an identical malfunction, the jetliner crashed into the Java Sea killing all 189 aboard.

The pilots of that flight reported problems to Lion Air's maintenance team, which checked the jet and Colleagues of victims of the crashed Lion Air flight throw flowers from the deck of an Indonesian Navy Pilots however say the control column behaves differently in certain conditions, which could

JAKARTA (Reuters) - A pilot of a doomed Lion Air jet told air traffic control that the plane was experiencing a " flight control problem " shortly before it crashed into the Java Sea last month, Indonesian investigators said on Wednesday.

“This accident in Ethiopia has raised further questions that make us want to delay delivery of MAX planes until we can get assurance that they’re safe,” said Daniel Putut, Lion Air Group’s managing director. He said that Lion, with more than 201 planes on order, hadn’t reached an agreement with Boeing over the sought-after delays.

Norwegian Air Shuttle ASA, one of the biggest 737 MAX customers, with 110 on order, said Wednesday it expects Boeing to compensate it for the financial impact of the suspension. Norwegian Air has had to cancel 19 flights, including trans-Atlantic services to the U.S. that use the 737 MAX 8. Norwegian grounded its 18 737 MAX 8 aircraft Tuesday.

While bigger airlines, with large fleets, have more flexibility to swap out aircraft, smaller carriers are more limited. Compensation from equipment makers for such service disruptions are common in the industry.

Bernstein Research analyst Daniel Roeska said Norwegian may lose as much as $46,000 per 737 MAX a day because of the groundings.

“We have not made any [cost] calculations at this time as our main priority is to ensure that affected passengers are being taken care of in the best possible way,” said Lasse Sandaker-Nielsen, senior vice president of communications at Norwegian. The airline said it worked through the night to redeploy its fleet, merge flights and rebook passengers on other flights to limit consequences for travelers.

Pilot of Crashed Jet Reported Flight-Control Problems © MICHAEL TEWELDE/AFP/Getty Images A photo shows debris of the crashed airplane of Ethiopia Airlines, near Bishoftu, a town some 60 kilometres southeast of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, on March 11, 2019. - Airlines in Ethiopia, China and Indonesia grounded Boeing 737 MAX 8 jets Monday as investigators recovered the black boxes from a brand-new passenger jet that crashed outside Addis Ababa a day earlier, killing all 157 people on board. (Photo by Michael TEWELDE / AFP) (Photo credit should read MICHAEL TEWELDE/AFP/Getty Images)

India’s SpiceJet Ltd. said it was canceling 14 flights Wednesday after its regulator late Tuesday also grounded the plane. The airline has a dozen 737 Max 8 aircraft in a fleet of 76 planes.

Ethiopian Airlines Installed Max 8 Simulator, but Pilot on Doomed Flight Didn’t Get Training

Ethiopian Airlines Installed Max 8 Simulator, but Pilot on Doomed Flight Didn’t Get Training Ethiopian Airlines surpassed many carriers by becoming one of the first to install a simulator to teach pilots how to fly the new Boeing 737 Max 8, but the captain of the doomed Flight 302 never trained on the simulator, according to people close to the airline’s operations. 

Several passengers have described the problem as a terrifying loss of altitude. Lion Air, a budget carrier "Shortly after requesting RTB, the pilot then contacted the control tower again to inform that the Data from flight -tracking websites show both flights had highly erratic speed and altitude after

Boeing wasn’t immediately available for comment early Wednesday, but has said it wouldn’t comment on discussions it has with customers over the groundings.

How quickly the grounded jets can start flying again could come down to how quickly airlines and governments are assured the plane is safe. While a full-blown investigation of the Ethiopian crash will take months, investigators can extract data from the plane’s black boxes within days. Those devices, which record key data and communications, are key to investigators.

Mr. Gebremariam, the Ethiopian Airlines CEO, said those black boxes would be sent to Europe for analysis, although a final determination as to which country hasn’t been made. He said the U.K., France and Germany were being considered, as well as the European Union Aviation Safety Agency based in Cologne, Germany, and that a decision would be made Wednesday. The Journal earlier reported that U.S. and Ethiopian officials were discussing the destination of the black boxes, with American officials quietly pushing for them to be sent to the U.S.

Hong Kong, Vietnam, Thailand, New Zealand and Lebanon on Wednesday joined regulators from China to Europe in grounding the plane after the Sunday crash in Ethiopia. In Canada, where the plane is still cleared to fly, Sunwing grounded its four 737 MAX 8s late Tuesday. Canadian Transport Minister Marc Garneu on Wednesday is due to address questions about the plane publicly.

South Korean aviation safety officials, who have ordered extra checks of the 737 MAX before allowing them to resume flying, said they were waiting for information from the FAA about the plane. “I do think that FAA needs to bring out a guideline for us because we’re going to be needing it to find out what could be wrong with the aircraft,” Park Joo-hwan, a deputy director of the ministry division overseeing the government review, said in an interview.

Write to Matina Stevis-Gridneff at [email protected] and Robert Wall at [email protected]

Ethiopian Airlines Installed Max 8 Simulator, but Pilot on Doomed Flight Didn’t Get Training.
Ethiopian Airlines surpassed many carriers by becoming one of the first to install a simulator to teach pilots how to fly the new Boeing 737 Max 8, but the captain of the doomed Flight 302 never trained on the simulator, according to people close to the airline’s operations. 

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!