US News: OK, So What Happens Now That MPs Have Voted To Delay Brexit? - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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US NewsOK, So What Happens Now That MPs Have Voted To Delay Brexit?

11:45  15 march  2019
11:45  15 march  2019 Source:   huffingtonpost.co.uk

What the papers say – March 13

What the papers say – March 13 Theresa May’s second Brexit blow dominates the agenda.

Brexit : What happens now ? By Peter Barnes Senior elections and political analyst, BBC News. So what happens if MPs back a delay ? Theresa May would then request an extension to Article 50 from the EU. Assuming the other member states all agreed, Brexit would be postponed.

Tonight’s vote represents day three of a series of Brexit votes that has seen May’s deal inflicted with the fourth biggest defeat (149) in (h) Sarah Wollaston, who recently quit the Conservatives to form The Independent Group of MPs has put forward a plan, calling for a Brexit delay long enough to hold

Watch: Parliament backs May's Brexit delay motion (Bloomberg)

The UK is due to leave the EU in 15 days time. But MPs have voted to delay exit day. So, what on earth happens now?

How long is the delay?

OK, So What Happens Now That MPs Have Voted To Delay Brexit? © PA Wire/PA Images The vote authorises Theresa May to ask the EU to extend Article 50 until June 30 – that is, if MPs vote in favour of her Brexit deal when it is put to a vote for a third time next week. The short delay would be to allow the necessary legislation to be passed.

Theresa May: Back me or risk losing Brexit altogether.

Theresa May: Back me or risk losing Brexit altogether. Theresa May is urging MPs to back a three-month Brexit postponement or face the threat of a much longer delay, in a desperate bid to persuade her pro-Leave rebels to back her withdrawal agreement next week. After a cabinet "gang of four" and several more ministers abstained and 17 backbenchers voted against the government in a Commons vote ruling out no deal, the Prime Minister has issued an ultimatum to Tory Brexiteers.

She told MPs that if her deal fails again to get their backing, a lengthy delay to Brexit may be needed. The prime minister's warning comes ahead of a Commons vote later on whether to ask the EU for permission MPs voted on Wednesday evening to reject a no-deal Brexit under any circumstances.

England voted for Brexit , by 53.4% to 46.6%. Wales also voted for Brexit , with Leave getting 52.5% of the vote and Remain 47.5%. Brexit -supporting MPs claim it would not be as bad as they say and the UK would save on the £39bn divorce bill, as well as being free to strike So what is happening now ?

But, if MPs once again reject the PM’s deal, May has warned a longer extension will be necessary to work out what to do instead.

Related: Analysis: The PM holds all the cards - for now

OK, So What Happens Now That MPs Have Voted To Delay Brexit? © PA

This would also mean the UK having to take part in the European parliament elections (and re-electing MEPs).

The prospect of a lengthy 21-month delay will pile pressure on eurosceptic Tory MPs to vote for May’s deal to ensure Brexit happens this year.

Brexit in-depth: All the latest news, analysis and expert opinion

Will the EU agree?

To extend Article 50, the Brussels has to say yes. It probably will. But EU leaders have said the UK must provide a “credible justification” for extending. Brussels wants to know what the UK wants, not just what it does not want.

DUP says issues remain over Brexit deal

DUP says issues remain over Brexit deal The party, which has twice voted against the deal, says it remains in discussions with the government. It has been reported by the Spectator magazine that there is a "better than 50:50 chance" the party will support the deal next week. MPs vote to seek delay to Brexit Will EU leaders agree to extending Brexit? McVey hints she will back PM's Brexit deal A DUP spokesman denied reports that extra money for Northern Ireland had been part of the talks, despite the involvement of Chancellor Philip Hammond in discussions on Friday.

Brexit : What happens now ? By Peter Barnes Senior elections and political analyst, BBC News. 12 March 2019. So what happens if MPs back a delay ? Theresa May would then request an extension to Article 50 from the EU. Assuming the other member states all agreed, Brexit would be postponed.

Sturgeon: Brexit vote delay is 'cowardice'. Some MPs called for it to come back to the Commons before Christmas, but Mrs May would only say the final deadline for the vote was 21 January. Mrs May wants to enable MPs to place obligations on the government "to ensure that the backstop cannot

Donald Tusk, the president of the European Council, said this morning he would appeal for EU leaders to agree to a “long” extension if the UK needs one to come up with a new Brexit plan. Simon Coveney, Ireland’s deputy prime minister, said a long extension would give the UK a “reflection period” about what it wants. It takes only one EU member state to veto an extension.

What do MPs want?

It’s still very unclear.

So what next?

All this has to be agreed very soon. A decision by Brussels to grant an extension would be made at the EU summit on Thursday March 21.

Could there still be a no-deal?

Yes.

MPs voting against no-deal on Wednesday evening was an expression of opinion. But it did not change the law. No-deal remains the default outcome if an agreement between the UK and EU is not signed by exit day – whenever that is, delay or not.

Will there be another general election?

Downing Street has said it is “not preparing for and we do not want a general election”.

Brexit: Peers face Saturday working and Easter break cut

Brexit: Peers face Saturday working and Easter break cut Hundreds of peers could have their Easter break cut and have to work on Saturdays in a bid to deliver Brexit. The House of Lords was warned that an impasse over Prime Minister Theresa May's EU divorce deal had left the fate of their working hours uncertain. Deputy speaker Lord Taylor of Holbeach said on Monday he thought peers would "all be better for having a break", but would be called back if necessary to perform their "public duty". The UK is due to leave the EU on 29 March, but Mrs May's inability to get her Brexit deal through parliament means she asked for a delay until 30 June.

MPs will vote on Thursday on delaying Brexit after they rejected the idea of leaving the EU without a deal. In a night of high drama in the Commons, MPs surprised the government and voted by 312 to 308 to reject a no-deal Brexit under any circumstances. The vote is not binding - under current law the

British MPs have voted for a delay in the Brexit process for three months or more, after struggling to agree on what terms the UK should leave the European Union on However, that is on the condition that MPs agree a deal by next Wednesday so there is enough breathing space before it's implemented.

But that does not mean one will not happen.

Charles Walker, a senior Tory backbencher, has said May will have to hold one. “It is not sustainable, the current situation in parliament,” he warned.

Labour has already tried and failed once to force a general election by tabling a vote of no confidence in the government.

But Emily Thornberry, the shadow foreign secretary, said this week the party would “take every opportunity” to do it again if it looked like it could win. And one Tory backbencher said today he would “seriously consider” backing a fresh bid by Jeremy Corbyn to get rid of May as PM.

Gallery: Facts to know about Brexit (Photo Services)

Another referendum?

A significant number of MPs want a second referendum. But at the moment, not a majority of them.

On Thursday evening MPs voted on an amendment to consider a people’s vote, but it was rejected, which makes it very unlikely unless Brexit is delayed by much longer – 21 months for example.

This is partly because there is not enough time for parliament to legislate for a public vote before March 29, or June 30 (after the delay).

A long extension however, could provide enough breathing space for a so-called people’s vote.

Will Article 50 be revoked?

Technically the British government can unilaterally decide to cancel Brexit by revoking Article 50. It does not have to get the EU to agree. But this seems the least likely of all options.

Will Theresa May resign?

OK, So What Happens Now That MPs Have Voted To Delay Brexit? © PA Wire/PA Images Theresa May survived an attempt by some Tory backbenchers to oust her in December. Under party rules that means she is safe from another challenge for 12 months.

But another defeat for her deal, a third in a row, could lead May to decide the game is up and that it is time to quit. The Conservatives would then have to pick a new leader to replace her as prime minister.

Tory MP George Freeman piled on the pressure today by suggesting the Commons would be more likely to vote for her deal on the condition she promised to quit after it was ratified.

EU Agrees To Brexit Delay – But Shorter Than Theresa May Asked For.
The European Union has agreed to Theresa May’s request for a short delay to Brexit – but not the three-month extension to June 30 she had asked for. According to a draft of the crunch EU summit’s conclusions, leaders from the remaining 27 nations have said the UK can extend Article 50, but just until May 22 – as long a MPs vote in favour of the PM’s deal next week. The date is the day before European elections start. The UK is due to leave the EU on March 29 – in just eight days time. If a deal is not signed, the legal default remains a no-deal Brexit on that date.

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