•   
  •   

US NewsCO2 in the atmosphere just exceeded 415 parts per million for the first time in human history

15:35  13 may  2019
15:35  13 may  2019 Source:   techcrunch.com

Rory Stewart: Tories would lose four million voters with tougher Brexit stance

Rory Stewart: Tories would lose four million voters with tougher Brexit stance The new International Development Secretary believes Remain supporters would abandon the the party if it made such a ‘mistake’.

"This is the first time in human history our planet's atmosphere has had more than 415 ppm CO 2 ," meteorologist Eric Holthaus tweeted. It was only a few years ago that carbon pollution in the atmosphere soared past 400 ppm, and it didn't take long much longer to reach 410 ppm (in 2017).

For the first time in human history — not recorded history , but since humans have existed on Earth — carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has topped 415 parts per million , reaching 415 .26 parts per This is the first time in human history our planet's atmosphere has had more than 415 ppm CO 2 .

Places around the world already affected by climate change (Photos)

The human race has broken another record on its race to ecological collapse. Congratulations humanity!

For the first time in human history -- not recorded history, but since humans have existed on Earth -- carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has topped 415 parts per million, reaching 415.26 parts per million, according to sensors at the Mauna Loa Observatory, a research outpost of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency.

CO2 in the atmosphere just exceeded 415 parts per million for the first time in human history © Provided by Oath Inc.

CO2 emissions over time as recorded by measurements of Arctic ice and the Mauna Loa Observatory. Courtesy of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

CO2 in the atmosphere just exceeded 415 parts per million for the first time in human history © Getty

The macabre milestone was noted on Twitter by the climate reporter Eric Holthaus, based on the data recorded and presented by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego.

If the threshold seems unremarkable (it shouldn't), it's yet another indication of the unprecedented territory humanity is now charting as it blazes new trails toward environmental catastrophe.

Just last week a report revealed that at least 1 million species were at risk of extinction thanks to human activity and the carbon emissions that are a byproduct of economic development.

Related: Planet on 'path to catastrophe' as million species threatened

CO2 in the atmosphere just exceeded 415 parts per million for the first time in human history © Sky News That's on top of news that climate change, which has been inextricably linked to carbon emissions, will cost the U.S. alone some $500 billion per year by 2090.

Related: Animals threatened by climate change (Photos)

The increasing proportion of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is important because of its heat absorbing properties. The land and seas on the planet absorb and emit heat and that heat is trapped in carbon dioxide molecules. The NOAA likens CO2 to leaving bricks in a fireplace, that still emit heat after a fire goes out.

Greenhouse gases contribute to the planet maintaining a temperature that can sustain life, but too much can impact the entire ecosystem that sustains us. That's what's happening now. As the NOAA notes, "increases in greenhouse gases have tipped the Earth's energy budget out of balance, trapping additional heat and raising Earth's average temperature."

The properties of CO2 also mean that it adds to the greenhouse effect in a way that other emissions do not, thanks to its ability to absorb wavelengths of thermal energy that things like water vapor can't. That's why increase of atmospheric carbon dioxide are responsible for about two-thirds of the total energy imbalance causing Earth's temperature to rise, according to the NOAA.

‘Literally drowning in plastic’: 414 million pieces of trash washed up on remote islands.
Working among the debris, researchers found 373,000 toothbrushes and 977,000 shoes. It would take the population of Cocos 4,000 years to produce an equivalent amount of trash, the study said. “They did not create this problem and they cannot undo it on their own,” Lavers said. In videos taken of the isolated beaches, hermit crabs could be seen scuttling among discarded flip-flops and crumpled bottles. Nearby, clumps of sun-bleached rope lay tangled in what appeared to be fishing nets.

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!