US News: A mystery illness killed a boy in 1969. Years later, doctors learned what it was: AIDS. - PressFrom - United Kingdom
  •   
  •   

US NewsA mystery illness killed a boy in 1969. Years later, doctors learned what it was: AIDS.

03:15  16 may  2019
03:15  16 may  2019 Source:   washingtonpost.com

Investigation underway into death of man in industrial accident

Investigation underway into death of man in industrial accident 0

Years later , doctors learned what it was : AIDS . Robert Rayford challenged the narrative about the epidemic. Share this The boy , Robert Rayford, died on May 15, 1969 , in St. Louis. It would be more than a decade before doctors started seeing similar cases among gay men in New York and California.

Years later , doctors learned what it was : AIDS . Robert Rayford challenged the narrative about the epidemic. The boy , Robert Rayford, died on May 15, 1969 , in St. Louis. It would be more than a decade before doctors started seeing similar cases among gay men in New York and California.

A mystery illness killed a boy in 1969. Years later, doctors learned what it was: AIDS. © Shayna Brenna/AP Volunteers walk on the 21,000 panel Names Project AIDS Memorial Quilt in Washington in 1992. (Ap Photo/Shayna Brenna)

The 16-year-old boy had the kind of illness that wouldn’t be familiar to doctors for years: He was weak and emaciated, rife with stubborn infections and riddled with rare cancerous lesions known as Kaposi’s sarcoma, a skin disease found in elderly men of Mediterranean descent.

The boy, Robert Rayford, died on May 15, 1969, in St. Louis. It would be more than a decade before doctors started seeing similar cases among gay men in New York and California. In 1982, with the numbers of sick surging, the disease got a name: Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. The AIDS epidemic had begun.

Passenger on Ryanair flight from Dublin Airport to Portugal thrown off plane by police for being 'verbally abusive'

Passenger on Ryanair flight from Dublin Airport to Portugal thrown off plane by police for being 'verbally abusive' In a video posted on Twitter, the man is repeatedly told to get his bag , Dublin Live reports. He is eventually pushed off the aircraft by the Portuguese officer. Ryanair confirmed the incident happened on May 2 and said the matter is now with local police. A spokesperson said: "This flight from Dublin to Faro (May 2) requested police assistance upon landing after a passenger became disruptive in-flight. "The aircraft landed normally and police and removed and detained this individual. "The safety and comfort of our customers, crew and aircraft is our number one priority.

A mystery illness killed a boy in 1969 . Years later , doctors learned what it was : AIDS . 2. An aged tree, witness to history, falls near the Washington Monument. Analysis It was 84 degrees near the Arctic Ocean this weekend as carbon dioxide hit its highest level in human history.

The patient, identified only as Robert R., died in 1969 of an illness that baffled his doctors at Washington Dr . Robert May, a mathematician at Princeton University who has studied the spread of AIDS '' It seems odd to me that it was in St. Louis to begin with,'' said Dr . Harold Jaffe, chief AIDS

But the mystery of Robert R. — as he was long known to researchers — would linger in the minds of the physicians who had cared for him. With a sense that something important could someday be learned, two doctors collected tissue samples after his death and froze them for almost 20 years.

Video: AIDS drugs prevent sexual transmission of HIV in gay men (Reuters)

In time, the case of a poor young African American who apparently never left the Midwest would add a surprising twist to the understanding of a disease many connected with gay white men in cosmopolitan coastal cities. Researchers would come to see Rayford as the country’s first known death from a strain of the human immunodeficiency virus, HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.

North Dublin shopping centre evacuated following 'incident' near Garda station

North Dublin shopping centre evacuated following 'incident' near Garda station North Dublin shopping centre evacuated following 'incident' near Garda station

He was a slender, uncommunicative boy whose condition, in 1969 , left doctors first at City Hospital and later at Deaconess Hospital in St. Louis both distressed and baffled. Despite his age Robert R. showed evidence of sexual promiscuity, though he led the doctors to believe it was heterosexual.

Eighteen years later , molecular biologists at Tulane University in New Orleans test samples of his Later it is determined that Noe contracted HIV/ AIDS in Africa during the early 1960s.[citation December 17, Ryan White was diagnosed with AIDS by a doctor performing a partial lung removal.

“Every time this date comes around, I think about this young man and the hell he went through,” said Memory Elvin-Lewis, a microbiologist who was central to the case. “It’s burned in my brain.”

For some, the assertion that Rayford died of AIDS may never be fully proved. Anthony Fauci, a renowned AIDS expert and head of infectious-disease research at the National Institutes of Health, said the inferior state of antibody tests at the time make the case of Robert R. both fascinating and frustrating.

A mystery illness killed a boy in 1969. Years later, doctors learned what it was: AIDS. HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) infection, computer artwork.

“It certainly could be true, and may even be likely that it’s true,” Fauci said, “but the absolute nailed-down proof isn’t there.”

Robert was already struggling when he arrived at St. Louis’s City Hospital in late 1968. Then 15, the boy was suffering from swollen legs and genitals, fatigue and hemorrhoids. But according to doctors at the time and journalists who went back over the case years later, neither Rayford nor his family were very forthcoming with information.

Gardai appeal for help tracing North Dublin woman last seen in Sligo

Gardai appeal for help tracing North Dublin woman last seen in Sligo She's described as 5ft 6 with slim build, and has short dark brown hair and blue eyes. Anyone with information is asked to contact Swords Garda Station 01-6664700 or the Garda Confidential Line 1800 666 111. A spokesperson said: "Gardaí in Swords are appealing to the public for assistance in tracing 39-year-old missing woman Deirdre Patterson. "Deirdre was last seen in the vicinity Sligo town shortly on 14/5/2019.

A RARE neurological “ mystery illness ” has killed one boy and affected up to 125 children across America, as doctors confess they are baffled by its cause. The CDC's director Dr Nancy Messonnier told reporters yesterday that the condition remained " a mystery so far". It is "a pretty dramatic

Goya is considered the most important Spanish painter of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. But in the middle of his career, in 1793, he developed a severe illness that left him bedridden for months. If Goya had been treated today, doctors would likely have identified the cause of his disease promptly

“He would never say a word to me,” said Elvin-Lewis, now 85 and still working.

Gallery: The biggest epidemics in history (Espresso)

The uncommunicative Rayford might have had a mental disability, doctors said later. When they found he had chlamydia, a sexually transmitted bacterial infection, he dodged questions about his sexual activity or would say only that he had been with a neighborhood girl. But there was physical evidence he had engaged in homosexual activity, willingly or not.

More frustrating, his doctors couldn’t come up with a clear diagnosis, and none of their treatments worked. Over 15 months, he was moved twice to other hospitals and his case attracted several specialists. One of them was Elvin-Lewis, a newly hired microbiologist at Washington University Dental School with an expertise in chlamydia. She was surprised to find the infection spread through Rayford’s body in a way she had never seen. And yet, the boy’s own defenses were barely fighting the bacteria. His immune system seemed strangely inert.

Three months after turning 16, Rayford died of pneumonia.

'Potential threat to life': Laser pen warning issued by Belfast Airport

'Potential threat to life': Laser pen warning issued by Belfast Airport 'Potential threat to life': Laser pen warning issued by Belfast Airport

A mysterious illness cost a healthy, athletic man parts of all four limbs. His eyes were beyond bloodshot. He stopped by Rite Aid for some Aleve, Clear Eyes, and Extra Strength Wouldn’t it be great, Dr . Azari thought , if a transplant recipient’s arm could be amputated in a way that prepped it

For the next year , I was unable to eat without vomiting, due to what would turn out to be a mystery illness that science didn't understand. After four years of this bullshit, I finally found a doctor who looked back through all of my old test results and spotted something everybody had missed.

A mystery illness killed a boy in 1969. Years later, doctors learned what it was: AIDS. Syringe on Hiv - aids grunge concept

The mystery only grew when the autopsy revealed numerous internal lesions known as Kaposi’s sarcoma, which were almost unheard of in a black teenager. Elvin-Lewis and a lymphologist named Marlys Witte, who didn’t respond to a request for an interview, had tissue samples gathered and preserved in sucrose-potassium glutamate in the hopes that medical science would someday be able to unlock some of their secrets.

“We knew there had to be another virus or something that was causing his immune deficiency,” Elvin-Lewis said.

There would be no answers for years. Elvin-Lewis and Witte did present a paper highlighting some of the perplexities of the case, but the world moved on. The Vietnam War flared up and wound down. Richard Nixon won election to a second term, vowed he wasn’t a crook and then resigned. Disco arrived, amid a wave of “Saturday Night Fever.” Cocaine coursed through the nightlife of big cities.

A mystery illness killed a boy in 1969. Years later, doctors learned what it was: AIDS. © Scott Stewart/AP AIDS patients are pushed in wheelchairs as they participate in the National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights in 1987. (AP Photo/Scott Stewart)

And gay men started getting sick in noticeable numbers.

In June 1981, the Center for Disease Control noted in its Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report the appearance of a rare pneumonia in five young gay men in Los Angeles. Additionally, the men, all of whom would die, showed compromised immune systems. The same day, a New York dermatologist tipped the CDC to a baffling spate of Kaposi’s sarcoma cases among gay men. Newspapers began writing about “gay-men’s pneumonia” and “gay cancer” and, eventually, of AIDS.

Celebrity haunt Luna is set to close its doors with immediate effect

Celebrity haunt Luna is set to close its doors with immediate effect The Dublin restaurant scene has been hit with another blow was celebrity hotspot Luna has closed its doors. 

Some 60 years later , we could then say that Black people are scurrilous; syphilis runs The issue there is that I was making irrational statements that the federal government made AIDS . So what we find is that this inducement and development of HIV/ AIDS , as they proclaim it to be a mystery illness

(WTTV) — An Indiana boy is recovering after a mystery illness forced doctors to amputate the lower half of 2- year -old Jeremiah began running a fever in late September. His family had been playing at Rhodius Park Doctors in the emergency room gave him an antibiotic, which killed the illness , and

Researchers slowly traced HIV’s probable origins to chimpanzee populations in central Africa, where it probably jumped to human hunters through contact with animal blood. They believed the virus crossed the globe with infected travelers in the 1970s. Multiple vectors of infection were identified, including homosexual and heterosexual contact, blood transfusions and sharing contaminated needles.

A mystery illness killed a boy in 1969. Years later, doctors learned what it was: AIDS. Group of young multiracial woman with red ribbons in hands are struggling against HIV/AIDS. AIDS awareness concept.

Little of that seemed to point to an obscure Midwestern medical mystery almost 15 years earlier. But for Rayford’s doctors, the descriptions of AIDS rang a bell. In 1984, Witte published a letter in a journal noting the similarities with Rayford’s history. In 1985, when a test became available that could detect HIV antibodies, Elvin-Lewis packed some of her long-held samples in dry ice and shipped them to Witte, who had them tested by Robert Garry, a Tulane virologist. Garry tested for nine distinct HIV proteins. Rayford’s blood showed evidence of all nine.

“Case Shakes Theories of AIDS Origin,” read a Chicago Tribune story that broke news of the results in October 1987. “Area Teen May Have Died from AIDS—In 1969,” said a banner headline in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

The tests on Rayford’s tissues astonished researchers. The finding wouldn’t change how the disease was treated, but it challenged the conventional wisdom of how it arrived.

A mystery illness killed a boy in 1969. Years later, doctors learned what it was: AIDS. Lab assistant looking at microscope slide with blood, genetic research, closeup

“If the findings are factual, it would be the earliest case of the AIDS in the United States,” epidemiologist Peter Selwyn told the Post-Dispatch at the time. “St. Louis doesn’t stand out as a hot spot for the AIDS virus.”

Researchers were skeptical. But as the testing grew more refined, Garry did further analysis that more conclusively pegged Rayford’s infection as an early strain of HIV that was distinct from the strain that led to the epidemic in the early 1980s.

Those tests haven’t erased all doubts, Fauci said. For him, “nailed-down proof” would require more testing on Rayford’s tissue samples. But that’s no longer possible. The last known tissue samples to survive were in Garry’s lab in New Orleans. They were wiped out by Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

MSN UK are Empowering Happiness for mental health awareness month. Find out more about our campaign and the charities working to stop people falling into crisis here.


Council spending more on the dead than on litter collection.
Cork spends more than all other councils in the nation on the dead with a €3.7m outlay on its graveyards in 2018. 

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 6
This is interesting!