•   
  •   

US NewsSee the face of a man from the last gasps of the Roman Empire

12:40  16 may  2019
12:40  16 may  2019 Source:   nationalgeographic.com

UKIP candidate investigated over rape comment

UKIP candidate investigated over rape comment A police investigation has been launched into whether a UKIP election candidate broke the law by suggesting he "might" rape a Labour MP. Carl Benjamin, who had previously said he "wouldn't even rape" Jess Phillips, posted an online video suggesting that "with enough pressure I might cave". After announcing a list of spoof UKIP policies, including invading Spain and restoring the British Empire, Benjamin said in a video posted on his YouTube channel: "There's been an awful lot of talk about whether I would or wouldn't rape Jess Phillips.

His face was reconstructed from a skeleton discovered in 2014, recovered from one of 47 early medieval graves excavated ahead of building He was interred in a Roman -style burial, in a grave lined and covered with rocks and his feet pointing north. See how these facial reconstructions reveal

Adelasius Ebalchus lived in Switzerland 1,300 years ago—and his expression sports a very unusual feature not seen in most facial reconstructions.

See the face of a man from the last gasps of the Roman Empire © Photograph courtesy Department of Archaeology of the Canton Solothurn, Switzerland

A 3D-printed copy of the skull was used as the base of the facial reonstruction. Adelasius had unusually good teeth for the time.

Adelasius Ebalchus has a decidedly Latin name for a man who lived in Switzerland around 700 A.D., centuries after the western Roman Empire fell apart. That choice of name was deliberate, explains Mirjam Wullschleger of the Solothurn state archaeology department. It was at this time that Germanic peoples were moving into the Swiss Plateau in the country’s north, changing the language and culture of the remnant Roman empire to that of the German-speaking Alemanni tribe.

Man dies following paragliding accident in Wicklow mountains

Man dies following paragliding accident in Wicklow mountains Man dies following paragliding accident in Wicklow mountains At approximately 8am this morning, the man’s body was discovered in a field at Ballinacor Estate, Wicklow ,together with wreckage. The body will be removed this morning for a post mortem examination. The Air Accident Investigation Unit (AAIU) have been informed and will commence an investigation. MORE NEWS Teen dies after horror stabbing in Dundrum (Irish Mirror) Rumours spread by Quirke were 'red herrings', says Garda (Independent.

At its height, the Roman Empire stretched from the Atlantic Ocean all the way to the Euphrates River in the Middle East, but its grandeur may have With such a vast territory to govern, the empire faced an administrative and logistical nightmare. Even with their excellent road systems, the Romans were

Was the collapse of the Roman empire in the west a series of gradual adjustments or a catastrophic event that brought violent change? In September 476 AD, the last Roman emperor of the west, Romulus Augustulus, was deposed by a Germanic prince called Odovacar, who had won control of

Adelasius’ name, and most of what we think we know about him, however, is speculation. His face was reconstructed from a skeleton discovered in 2014, recovered from one of 47 early medieval graves excavated ahead of building construction in the town of Grenchen in northern Switzerland. He was interred in a Roman-style burial, in a grave lined and covered with rocks and his feet pointing north. See the face of a man from the last gasps of the Roman Empire © Photograph by Oscar Nilsson

Adelasius Ebalchus, who lived in northern Swizterland 1,300 years ago. He was in his late teens or early twenties when he died.

Based on his remains, researchers determined Adelasius was between 19 and 22 years old and about 5 feet, 6 inches tall. He suffered from chronic osteomyelitis, a bone infection, and vitamin deficiencies—the combination of which likely led to his early death. His rock-lined grave may indicate a higher social status than other people living in Grenchen at the time.

Man, 40s, stabbed in face following early morning row in north Kildare village

Man, 40s, stabbed in face following early morning row in north Kildare village Man, 40s, stabbed in face following early morning row in north Kildare village

See the spread of the Roman Empire with these architectural wonders in provincial territories. He was the last pagan emperor of Rome and came to be known as `Julian the Apostate’ for his The Western Roman Empire officially ended 4 September 476 CE, when Emperor Romulus Augustulus

As the Roman Republic, and later the Roman Empire , expanded, it came to include people from a variety of cultures, and religions. The worship of an ever increasing number of deities was tolerated

When Oscar Nilsson, an archaeological facial reconstructor, was commissioned to reconstruct the face of Adelasius Ebalchus, he was struck not only by the quality of the 3D-printed skull he had to work with, but also the state of his historical model’s dental work.

“I’ve never seen more even or perfect teeth,” says Nilsson, who has worked on facial reconstructions from remains going back to the Paleolithic. “It’s not the typical case for me. Quite often, I have to start reconstructing the teeth by looking at what’s around them.” See the face of a man from the last gasps of the Roman Empire © Photograph courtesy Department of Archaeology of the Canton Solothurn, Switzerland

Adelasius was buried in a grave lined with rocks, which may indicate he was of high social status.

Nilsson knew that he wanted to highlight Adelasius’ teeth and decided that the reconstructed face would smile—a decision he doesn’t take lightly.

When doing facial reconstructions—especially for law enforcement work—it’s not advisable to give your subject a smile, says Nilsson. It distracts from the overall physical impact of the reconstruction, he explains, while creating “an unconscious assumption that it’s a happy person.”

'We should never underestimate the difficulties they face' - Justice Minister pays tribute to gardai who lost their lives during service

'We should never underestimate the difficulties they face' - Justice Minister pays tribute to gardai who lost their lives during service Justice Minister Charlie Flanagan paid tribute today to gardai who gave their lives in the line of duty. He contrasted their sacrifice and bravery to the "ignominious cowardice" of those sought to undermine people's way of life in Ireland. He was speaking at the annual Memorial Day for members of the force killed on duty. The 88 gardai who lost their lives upholding law, order and peace in Ireland since the foundation of the State are an inspiration and example for all, he said. Families and loved ones of many of the officers who fell in the line of duty were present at the ceremony at Dublin Castle this afternoon.

The history of the Jews in the Roman Empire traces the interaction of Jews and Romans during the period of the Roman Empire (27 BC – AD 476).

The last emperor to rule a unified Roman Empire that controlled all of the traditional Roman territories of the and forced to flee from the Roman capital of Ravenna to Dalmatia. I personally see no reason why the inhabitants of the eastern Roman Empire cannot be accurately described as both

Gallery: The world's most impressive Roman ruins (Love Exploring)

See the face of a man from the last gasps of the Roman Empire

“I don’t want to describe a personality I know nothing about,” he says. “At the same time, though, I need to create a face that gives the impression that this person was once alive and has a soul.”

Nilsson has worked on individuals from many regions and time periods, but early medieval Switzerland was a first for him. “It’s quite exciting and quite under explored. I hope I can put some light into this period of history.”

Adelasius will be exhibited at Grenchen’s Kultur-Historischen Museum through early June, and then in November be put on permanent display at Solothurn’s state museum of archaeology in Olten.

Post Office chief's £3.7m BONANZA: Gargantuan pay packet slammed as a ‘slap in the face’ for workers.
Former Post Office Chief Paula Vennells, 60, was paid £3.7million in the last six years. Her total pay jumped seven per cent last year to £720,000, nearly five times Prime Minister Theresa May's salary.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!