US News: Study: Oceans will lose one-sixth of marine life from current greenhouse gas emissions - PressFrom - United Kingdom
  •   
  •   

US NewsStudy: Oceans will lose one-sixth of marine life from current greenhouse gas emissions

08:35  12 june  2019
08:35  12 june  2019 Source:   thehill.com

Ireland set to miss greenhouse emissions targets unless action taken, EPA warns

Ireland set to miss greenhouse emissions targets unless action taken, EPA warns New policies are needed if Ireland is to meet carbon emissions targets, the EPA has said.

Washington — The world's oceans will likely lose about one - sixth of its fish and other marine life by the end of the century if climate change continues on its current path, a new study says. CBS News. If the world's greenhouse gas emissions stay at the present rate, that means a 17% loss of biomass

WASHINGTON (AP) — The world's oceans will likely lose about one sixth of its fish and other marine life by the end of the century if climate change continues on its current path, a new study And that does not include effects of fishing. If the world's greenhouse gas emissions stay at the present rate

Study: Oceans will lose one-sixth of marine life from current greenhouse gas emissions © Getty Images climate change

Marine life decreases by 5 percent with every 1 degree Celsius increase in the temperature of the oceans, according to a study released Tuesday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The study projects a 17 percent loss of marine biomass by 2100 if greenhouse gas emissions stay at the present rate, the Associated Press reports.

The projected biomass decrease does not include the effects of fishing, according to the study.

Gallery: 8 aquatic animals that might be extinct in 100 years (Business Insider)

Julia Baum, a biology professor at at University of Victoria, told the AP the potential ramifications of marine life loss are huge, noting people around the world rely on ocean resources.

"Climate change has the potential to cause serious new conflicts over ocean resource use and global food security, particularly as human population continues to grow this century," Baum said.

World Oceans Day: UK joins fight against plastic pollution

World Oceans Day: UK joins fight against plastic pollution The UK is joining the global fight against plastic pollution by marking World Oceans Day in a bid to raise awareness about protecting and conserving the seas. Events are held on 8 June in an annual observation to honour the world's oceans, which provide the earth with many resources including oxygen, climate regulation, food sources, medicine and more. However the oceans and marine life, such as corals and important fisheries are under threat due to a number of challenges they face including plastic pollution and overfishing.

Industry (21% of 2010 global greenhouse gas emissions ): Greenhouse gas emissions from industry primarily involve fossil fuels burned on site at facilities for energy. This sector also includes emissions from chemical, metallurgical, and mineral transformation processes not associated with energy

Larger emissions of greenhouse gases lead to higher concentrations in the atmosphere. Natural emissions of N2O are mainly from bacteria breaking down nitrogen in soils and the oceans . Nitrous oxide is removed from the atmosphere when it is absorbed by certain types of bacteria or destroyed

Other reports have previously predicted reduction in ocean life, but study co-author William Cheung, a marine ecologist at the University of British Columbia, told the AP this is a more comprehensive look at the current situation by using six different computer models.

Study: Oceans will lose one-sixth of marine life from current greenhouse gas emissions Study co-author Derek Tittensor, a marine ecologist at the United Nations World Conservation Monitoring Center in England, told the AP that the ocean's biggest animals will be hit the hardest.

Study co-author Boris Worm, a marine biologist at Dalhousie University in Canada, told the AP the "good news" is the decline will be less heavy in smaller organisms that are "the main building blocks of marine life," such as plankton and bacteria.

"The bad news is that those marine animals that we use directly, and care about most deeply, are predicted to suffer the most as climate change is working its way up the food chain," Worm added.

MSN are empowering Women In Sport this summer. Find out more about our campaign and the charity fighting to promote the transformational and lifelong rewards of exercise for women and girls in the UK here.

Canada bans whale, dolphin captivity.
Canadian lawmakers passed legislation on Monday banning whale and dolphin captivity in the country.The federal bill - which was approved in the House of Commons on Monday after first being introduced in the Senate in 2015 - now requires only royal assent to become law. Under the new law, the practice of holding whales, dolphins and porpoises will be phased out, though animals currently in captivity will remain. It also bans the capture of wild dolphins and whales, or cetaceans, as well as the practice of captive breeding and the import and export of such animals.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 6
This is interesting!