US News: Doctors could use SCORPION venom to fight human infections including tuberculosis after study on mice finds some strains can kill bacteria without poisonous effects - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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US NewsDoctors could use SCORPION venom to fight human infections including tuberculosis after study on mice finds some strains can kill bacteria without poisonous effects

05:25  15 june  2019
05:25  15 june  2019 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

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Researchers have found two chemicals that are effective against dangerous bacteria . You have chosen to share the following article: How elderberries can help you fight the flu. Researchers have managed to synthesize two scorpion venom compounds that are effective against some strains of

Using a tiny sample of the venom , researchers were able to work out the molecular structure of the two compounds. — iStock. BOSTON. Scientists have discovered two colour-changing compounds in scorpion venom that could help fight bacterial infections such as drug-resistant tuberculosis .

Doctors could use SCORPION venom to fight human infections including tuberculosis after study on mice finds some strains can kill bacteria without poisonous effects © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Doctors could use scorpion venom to fight human infections after a study on mice found it can kill bacteria without poisonous effects, scientists have found

Doctors could use scorpion venom to fight human infections after a study on mice found it can kill bacteria without poisonous effects. The venom contains two chemicals which scientists discovered have antibacterial abilities and were able to kill strains responsible for diseases such as tuberculosis.

Taken from the Diplocentrus melici scorpion, which is found in Mexico, the venom has promise because it managed to fight off bacteria without damaging healthy tissue in mice. But there is a catch – because it's so difficult to extract from such a specific and deadly insect, scientists say it would cost around £34m per gallon to produce for medicine.

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"We found that these compounds killed bacteria , but then the question became 'Will it kill you, too?' They isolated the compounds in the scorpion ’s venom , synthesized them in the lab, and verified that the lab-made versions killed Staphylococcus and drug-resistant tuberculosis bacteria in

Your doctor can perform tests to help determine the cause. Since the first antibiotics were used to fight tuberculosis more than 60 years ago, some TB germs have developed the ability to Drug-resistant strains of tuberculosis emerge when an antibiotic fails to kill all of the bacteria it targets.

Professor Richard Zare, from Stanford University, study senior author, said: 'These compounds might not be the poisonous component of the venom. 'We have no idea why the scorpion makes these compounds. There are more mysteries.' Professor Zare worked with Professor Lourival Possani, from the National Autonomous University of Mexico, who has focused on identifying compounds with medicinal potential in scorpion venom for 45 years.

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Their students captured a few specimens of D. melici in Mexico then 'milked' them for the venom by stimulating their tails with mild electric pulses. The researchers found two key chemical compounds called benzoquinones.

Both compounds had a similar molecular structure and one contained oxgygen and the other sulfur. Professor Zare said: 'We only had 0.5 microliters of the venom to work with. This is ten times less than the amount of blood a mosquito will suck in a single serving.'

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Researchers at Stanford studying scorpion venom have identified a pair of compounds that were shown to kill off both staph and tuberculosis bacteria . Just last month, researchers discovered how an amino acid in scorpion venom could be used to help clinicians more easily detect lethal brain

WHAT OTHER MEDICINES ARE MADE WITH ANIMAL PRODUCTS?

Medicinal uses of animals, mainly of insects, has been used traditionally across the world and is still incorporated into modern medicine in some countries. Dung beetles have been recommended for constipation, for example, spider silk for healing wounds, and grasshoppers to relieve headaches.

While many are now considered pseudoscience, some have been scientifically proven to have potential – such as bees' honey which has been found to have antibiotic and anti-inflammatory properties in some studies. There has been little medical research conducted since the revolutionary invention of antibiotics.

Doctors could use SCORPION venom to fight human infections including tuberculosis after study on mice finds some strains can kill bacteria without poisonous effects © Getty Photo Taken In Germany, Berlin Numerous medicines do contain ingredients derived from animals, usually pigs or cows. These include some insulins, vaccines and pancreatic enzyme supplements. Other animals' natural bodily fluids are in research, such as the poisonous venom of the Colorado River toad.

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“We found that these compounds killed bacteria , but then the question became ‘Will it kill you, too?’ … And the answer is no: Hernández-Pando’s group showed that the blue compound kills tuberculosis bacteria but leaves the lining of the lungs in mice intact.”

Using venom to help save lives. One such example is the discovery made by scientists from Stanford University in The study was done on mice test subjects and tissue samples to test the compounds’ effectivity in fighting Scorpions may be some of the freakiest creepy-crawlers on this planet, but

A psychedelic compound, called 5-MeO-DMT holds promise for treating anxiety and depression, researchers at Johns Hopkins University said. The benzoquinone compounds were sent to Dr Rogelio Hernández-Pando at the Salvador Zubirán National Institute of Health Sciences and Nutrition, in Mexico City, for further testing.

The team there found that red 1,4-benzoquinone, one of the chemicals, effectively destroyed Staphylococcus aureus, which commonly cause skin infections. Meanwhile blue 1,4-benzoquinone, the other, was lethal to strains of tuberculosis-causing bacteria – both normal and those resistant to drugs.

Tuberculosis is one of the world's top causes of death, according to the World Health Organization, infecting 10million people and killing 1.6m in 2017. Professor Zare said: 'We found that these compounds killed bacteria, but then the question became "Will it kill you, too?".

Doctors could use SCORPION venom to fight human infections including tuberculosis after study on mice finds some strains can kill bacteria without poisonous effects © Getty Opioid epidemic, painkillers and drug abuse concept with close up on a bottle of prescription drugs and hydrocodone pills falling out of it on white 'And the answer is no: Hernández-Pando’s group showed that the blue compound kills tuberculosis bacteria but leaves the lining of the lungs in mice intact.'Although the team could work how to produce the medicine in a large quantity, there are limits to how much could be harvested from the animals.

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Professor Possani said: 'The amount of venom components we can get from the animals is extremely low. 'The synthesis of the compounds was decisive for the success of this work.' Professor Zare added: 'By volume, scorpion venom is one of the most precious materials in the world. It would costs $39million (£34,703,000) to produce a gallon of it.

'If you depended only on scorpions to produce it, nobody could afford it, so it’s important to identify what the critical ingredients are and be able to synthesize them.' The research was published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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