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US NewsHow are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?

12:55  23 august  2019
12:55  23 august  2019 Source:   nbcnews.com

Climate change: Global warming is shaping life choices

Climate change: Global warming is shaping life choices For some, ignoring climate change is not an option. It’s real, and preventing global warming from getting worse is a driving force in their lives. Deciding what to do with their lives “There’s a strong chance that society, as we know, it is going to be in shambles,” said Faith Ward, a 19-year-old climate activist with the youth movement Zero Hour. “What position am I going to be in for the sake of leadership?” Ward is from Plantation, Florida, a city in the thick of the climate crisis because of its coastal location.

"The effects of forest destruction in the Amazon don't stay in the Amazon . They affect us all," one "There are large negative consequences for climate change globally, as the fires contribute to The Amazon rainforest sprawls across nine countries and is the largest rainforest in the world, about

For almost three weeks straight now, the Amazon rainforest has been on fire . This isn't an isolated Burning the Amazon doesn't just prevent the forest from absorbing that carbon in the future—it The survey findings are “reflective of the fact that the pandemic is simply affecting women more in their

Record fires sweeping across the Amazon this month are bringing renewed scrutiny to Brazil's deforestation policy and have environmental researchers and conservationists worried that they will only aggravate the climate change crisis.

"The effects of forest destruction in the Amazon don't stay in the Amazon. They affect us all," said Robin Chazdon, professor emerita at the University of Connecticut who has studied tropical forest ecology.

How Did the Amazon Rainforest Fires Start?

How Did the Amazon Rainforest Fires Start? Brazil has experienced a record number of wildfires this year, more than half of which occurred in the Amazon region. That's according to data collected by the country's National Institute for Space Research (INPE). © Thomson Reuters Smoke billows during a fire in an area of the Amazon rainforest near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil, Brazil August 21, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino The figures show an 83 percent increase in comparison to the same period in 2018, representing the highest number of blazes since the agency began collecting such data in 2013, Reuters reported.

Losing our forests means losing the fight against the climate crisis, putting biodiversity at risk of extinction, and threatening the lives of Indigenous Peoples who depend on the forest standing for their survival. In 2019, the images of the fires raging in the Amazon went viral and shocked the world.

# Amazon # Rainforest #Wildfire Fires are raging at a record rate in Brazil's Amazon rainforest and scientists warn it could strike a devastating blow to the

Related: Leaders clash as Amazon burns

Grabbing headlines this week has been the unsettling sight of heavy smoke blowing from some of the fires and reaching about 2,000 miles away, cloaking the Brazilian city of Sao Paulo in darkness during the day. The fires have inspired the hashtag #PrayforAmazonia, and have received attention from the likes of Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders, rapper Lil Nas X and U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres.

But there's more at stake than people might realize, Chazdon said.

Related: 'The lungs of the Earth are on fire'

"There are large negative consequences for climate change globally, as the fires contribute to carbon emissions," she added. If the rainforests are "not allowed to regenerate or be reforested, they will not be able to recover their high potential for carbon storage."

Brazil must protect Amazon rainforest, or I will seek to block EU Mercosur deal - Varadkar

Brazil must protect Amazon rainforest, or I will seek to block EU Mercosur deal - Varadkar Ireland will seek to block the Mercosur trade deal between the EU and South American countries unless Brazil protects the Amazon rainforest, Taoiseach Leo Varadkar has warned. Mr Varadkar also attacked controversial Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro for his claim environmental groups were starting fires in the forest to make him look bad. The Taoiseach branded the unsubstantiated allegations as "Orwellian".

Rainforest in the Peruvian Amazon . Photo by Rhett A. Butler. How drought affects the Amazon . " Amazon drought kills selectively and therefore may also alter species composition, pointing to potential consequences of future drought events on the biodiversity in the Amazon region," the authors wrote.

When healthy, the Amazon rainforest is one of the planet's most critical defenses against further (CNN) In 2019, record fires in the Amazon sparked international outrage and capped a decade that saw the rainforest lose But fires could imperil its ability to fight climate change , the study found

The vast swaths of rainforest play an important role in the world's ecosystem because they absorb heat instead of it being reflected back into the atmosphere. They also store carbon dioxide and produce oxygen, ensuring that less carbon is released, mitigating the effects of climate change, scientists say.

How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change? © Paul Rosolie Image: Amazon rainforest fire

But with fires ravaging vegetation, research shows it could take more than a century to recover the carbon storage that was lost.

"Forests can regrow following fires, but not if fires are repeated every few years and not if the land is converted to agriculture," Chazdon said.

She added that the shrinking of the Amazon and its transition into scrubland "could bring a tipping point to forest functioning that is not easily reversible."

The Amazon rainforest spreads across nine countries and is the largest rainforest in the world, about half the size of the United States. It has also been burning at a record rate, according to Brazil's National Institute for Space Research, with more than 74,000 fires in Brazil alone this year, nearly double the total for 2018.

Brazil dispatches troops, military aircraft to battle Amazon forest fires

Brazil dispatches troops, military aircraft to battle Amazon forest fires The Brazilian military is deploying troops to the Amazon to fight the massive wildfires that have swept the region and sparked an international outcry. Brazil's defense minister has said that some 44,000 troops will be available for "unprecedented" operations to put out the fires, and forces are heading to six Brazilian states that asked for federal help. The states are Roraima, Rondonia, Tocantins, Para, Acre and Mato Grosso. "The protection of the forest is our duty," Brazil President Jair Bolsonaro said in a televised address Friday.

The humid forests of the Amazon have no adaptation to fire and suffer immense damage. Almost all fires in humid forests are started by people. But he says that climate change and deforestation are a dangerous combination. A reduction in rainfall would create dry conditions for fires to spread.

The Amazon , the largest rainforest in the world, roughly half the size of the United States, is key to the health of the entire planet. Here's why its destruction matters, and how you can help the nonprofits fighting to save it and forests worldwide.

According to an analysis of NASA data, in the last three months Brazil has had twice as many observed fires as in the same period in 2018.

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#Regram #RG @rainforestalliance: The lungs of the Earth are in flames. ???? The Brazilian Amazon—home to 1 million Indigenous people and 3 million species—has been burning for more than two weeks straight. There have been 74,000 fires in the Brazilian Amazon since the beginning of this year—a staggering 84% increase over the same period last year (National Institute for Space Research, Brazil). Scientists and conservationists attribute the accelerating deforestation to President Jair Bolsonaro, who issued an open invitation to loggers and farmers to clear the land after taking office in January.⁣ ⁣ The largest rainforest in the world is a critical piece of the global climate solution. Without the Amazon, we cannot keep the Earth’s warming in check. ⁣ ⁣ The Amazon needs more than our prayers. So what can YOU do?⁣ ⁣ ✔ As an emergency response, donate to frontline Amazon groups working to defend the forest. ⁣ ✔ Consider becoming a regular supporter of the Rainforest Alliance’s community forestry initiatives across the world’s most vulnerable tropical forests, including the Amazon; this approach is by far the most effective defense against deforestation and natural forest fires, but it requires deep, long-term collaboration between the communities and the public and private sectors. ✔ Stay on top of this story and keep sharing posts, tagging news agencies and influencers. ⁣ ✔ Be a conscious consumer, taking care to support companies committed to responsible supply chains.⁣ Eliminate or reduce consumption of beef; cattle ranching is one of the primary drivers of Amazon deforestation. ✔ When election time comes, VOTE for leaders who understand the urgency of our climate crisis and are willing to take bold action—including strong governance and forward-thinking policy.⁣ ⁣ #RainforestAlliance #SaveTheAmazon #PrayForAmazonia #AmazonRainforest #ActOnClimate #ForestsResist #ClimateCrisis ????: @mohsinkazmitakespictures / Windy.com

As Amazon Burns, Fires in Next-Door Bolivia Also Wreak Havoc

As Amazon Burns, Fires in Next-Door Bolivia Also Wreak Havoc Amid growing international alarm over fires in Brazil’s Amazon region, neighboring Bolivia is facing devastating fires of its own, with flames devouring farmland and environmentally sensitive forests alike . In midst of the calamity, the country’s president, Evo Morales, suspended his re-election campaign on Sunday and, in a shift, welcomed foreign aid. © Aizar Raldes/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images President Evo Morales of Bolivia said he would accept international aid and suspend his re-election campaign to fight wildfires.

A post shared by Leonardo DiCaprio (@leonardodicaprio) on

This year has not been a particularly dry year, Chazdon said, so unusual drought does not explain why there have been so many conflagrations, although not all are large in size.

Environmental groups have blamed the policies of Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, who took office in January, for rolling back environmental protections that have paved the way for the illegal clearing of forests in favor of cattle farming and agriculture. On Wednesday, Bolsonaro posted a video to Facebook blaming nongovernmental organizations for setting the blazes as a tactic to malign him, although he provided no evidence for the claim.

"There is a war going on in the world against Brazil, an information war," Bolsonaro said.

Related: The Amazon is ablaze (Photos)

How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?

The loss of more land could have a frightening effect in other ways, ecologists say.

Trees in the Amazon help to pump water from the soil into the atmosphere, bringing much-needed rainfall to other areas.

"These massive fires burning now reduce the resilience of the Amazon forest to future droughts and climate change at the same time that this forest is needed to mitigate against these threats," Chazdon said. "Protection and restoration of Amazon forest has never been more urgent."

Roel Brienen, a professor at the University of Leeds in England who has studied the Amazon basin for more than 15 years, said the current level of deforestation is worrying for what it means to the loss of biodiversity and the release of more carbon into the atmosphere.

The Amazon Is Not Earth’s Lungs

The Amazon Is Not Earth’s Lungs Humans could burn every living thing on the planet and still not dent its oxygen supply.

"If we kill enough forest, we may be tipping the Amazon into a new, much drier state, and it may turn into a savanna," Brienen said in an email. "This would be a great loss to our planet and almost means game over for our battle against climate change."

He added that while such a doomsday scenario is still far off, it will take policy changes to be enacted now.

"Brazil can do as it has shown in the past, but only if there is political will," Brienen said.

Related: Places around the world already affected by climate change (Photos)

How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?
How are the raging fires in the Amazon rainforest affecting climate change?

American conservationist Paul Rosolie, who has regularly traveled to the Amazon rainforest in Peru's Madre de Dios region for 13 years, said these fires are of concern not just in Brazil but across the continent. He blames a decade of apathy toward deforestation for allowing the problem to fester.

"We've never seen it at this scale before," Rosolie said, "and that's what's getting people scared. If your house was on fire, you'd call 911, but that's not an option here."

In addition to the climate, he said, he's also worried about the biodiversity — the tens of thousands of tree species and plants and the hundreds of thousands of insects and other wildlife that call the Amazon home.

Each tree, he said, holds thousands of species, and he's seen firsthand how fires have disrupted the largest of mammals to the smallest of leafcutter ants.

"As this fire is seeping through the Amazon, we're losing millions and millions of animals," Rosolie said.

The Amazon, Siberia, Indonesia: A World of Fire.
In South America, the Amazon basin is ablaze. Halfway around the world in central Africa, vast stretches of savanna are going up in flame. Arctic regions in Siberia are burning at a historic pace. While the Brazilian fires have grown into a full-blown international crisis, they represent only one of many significant areas where wildfires are currently burning around the world. Their increase in severity and spread to places where fires were rarely previously seen is raising fears that climate change is exacerbating the danger.

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