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US NewsBrexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying

19:10  11 september  2019
19:10  11 september  2019 Source:   theweek.co.uk

Leo Varadkar on Brexit chaos: 'If the House of Commons went pay-per view, they would make a lot of money'

Leo Varadkar on Brexit chaos: 'If the House of Commons went pay-per view, they would make a lot of money' TAOISEACH Leo Varadkar has responded to the Brexit chaos in Westminster saying "if the House of Commons went pay per view, they'd make a lot of money". He also took an extraordinary pot-shot British Prime Minister Boris Johnson says before they meet in Dublin. He expressed surprise at Mr Johnson's taunts of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn during heated exchanges on Brexit and the prospect of an election in the UK. Mr Varadkar said: "The Dáil is not always an example of virtue an there are plenty of non-sensical displays of behaviour... I don’t really think a Taoiseach would ever call somebody a big girls blouse.

Then there is the fact that Brexit has inoculated them against the Nexit their wilder politicians are still flogging: 72% now say they are best off in the EU. Jean-Marc Puissesseau, the president of the company that runs the Calais port – also working hard to avoid Brexit chaos – says there were signs

But that is not the world that we live in. In this world , the mythology of elections says that they are perfect, infallible expressions of the A version of this article appears in print on , Section A, Page 14 of the New York edition with the headline: An Odd Massachusetts Election and the Brexit Chaos .

Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying © Provided by Dennis Publishing Limited

Westminster has descended into chaos over the past week, with MPs holding signs that read “silenced” protesting in the House of Commons early on Tuesday following the suspension of Parliament.

The shutdown came after Boris Johnson suffered his sixth parliamentary defeat in as many days, with MPs voting to block a snap election and no-deal Brexit and to make No. 10 publish the Government’s secret plans for crashing out of the EU without an agreement.

The prime minister has dismissed as “nonsense” claims that his decision to prorogue Parliament until 14 October is undemocratic.

'The government must be absolutely honest' - Micheál Martin calls on Varadkar to reveal plans for custom checks near border

'The government must be absolutely honest' - Micheál Martin calls on Varadkar to reveal plans for custom checks near border 'The government must be absolutely honest' - Micheál Martin calls on Varadkar to reveal plans for custom checks near border

Brexit recession fears ease as UK returns to growth in July - business live. Read more. Sir Charlie Bean, a former deputy governor of the Bank of England, said he thought it “highly unlikely” He said that after the planned shutdowns, factories would likely have continued producing over the summer

That gave both voters and elected representatives a say . The Brexit referendum, by contrast, demanded a specific policy outcome but offered A version of this article appears in print on , Section A, Page 6 of the New York edition with the headline: Another Brexit Vote Could Worsen Chaos

But what does the rest of the world think about the ongoing political carnage?

Donald Trump jumped to Johnson’s defence last week as the PM battled in the Commons, reports Politico.

“Boris is a friend of mine and he’s going at it, there’s no question about it,” the US president told reporters in the Oval Office last Wednesday. “I watched him this morning, he’s in there fighting and he knows how to win. Boris knows how to win. Don’t worry about him, he’s going to be OK.”

But a week later, The New York Times doesn’t seem so sure, describing Johnson’s first days at Downing Street as “one of the most abysmal starts any British leader has ever endured”.

Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying © AP

The newspaper says that Monday was a “day of defeat” for the “bare-knuckled new prime minister”, although “it was just another day in the new Britain, which has been bitterly divided since voters narrowly voted in favor of parting company with the European Union in a 2016 referendum”.

Boris Johnson Rules Out Election Pact With Nigel Farage's Brexit Party

Boris Johnson Rules Out Election Pact With Nigel Farage's Brexit Party Boris Johnson has ruled out striking an election pact with The Brexit Party because Nigel Farage should “never be allowed anywhere near government”. 

The politician said :“The purpose of the Bill is to ensure that the UK does not leave the European Union on the 31 October without an agreement, unless Parliament consents. “The Bill gives the Government time either to reach a new agreement with the European Union at the European Council meeting next

Those in favour of leaving said Britain was being held back by EU red tape with too many rules on business. What happens after Brexit ? The transition period is a bridging agreement between the current situation – where we are members of the EU – and our long-term relationship outside the bloc.

The Times continues: “It seemed clear that if Mr Johnson had thought he could outfox Parliament by suspending it, sidelining lawmakers at a critical moment in the Brexit debate, he was the one who had been outmanoeuvred.”

However, Sebastian Seibt at France 24 argues that Johnson’s apparent “failure after failure” makes sense through the lense of “game theory” - a branch of mathematics which looks at how to design a winning game plan that takes into account the competing strategies of other players.

Seibt says the British PM is preparing to invite European negotiators to a game of “poule mouillee”, which translates as wimp or sissy. This view is backed by Soren Schwuchow, a game theory expert from the Brandenburg Technological University in Cottbus, who believes Johnson is betting on the EU backing down first because the bloc thinks he is crazy enough to crash out without a deal.

Julian Smith called back from Irish border for Cabinet meeting

Julian Smith called back from Irish border for Cabinet meeting A planned protest outside one of the venues the Northern Ireland Secretary was due to visit was called off.

EU rules dictate that , if it wishes to push back the Brexit deadline, the UK - as the leaving member state - has to ask for an extension from the EU. And Brussels is more than happy for him to do it. Letting the UK know that Brexit extensions are not always automatic is one of the few ways the EU

This would, the document says , let a post- Brexit UK set its own tariffs for trade with the rest of the world without causing border disruption. The statement ends by saying the plans, along with details to be set out in next week’s planned white paper, represent “a precise and responsible approach to

Whatever Johnson’s strategy, a front-page editorial titled “Boris the Menace” in conservative French daily Le Figaro warns that “the prime minister’s bad manners create a dangerous precedent” for British democracy, “revealing the vulnerabilities of the system”.

And Deutsche Welle (DW) points out that the move would be “unthinkable” in Germany. Christoph Gusy, professor of constitutional history at the country’s University of Bielefeld, tells the newspaper that Germany’s equivalent of the Commons “controls the government, and not the other way round”.

Gallery: Leave vs Remain: Brexit demonstrations around the UK (Photos)

Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying
Brexit chaos: what the rest of the world is saying

The German Basic Law - signed in 1949 with the aim of preventing any future dictators coming to power - ensures there is no period without a parliament in place.

“What Johnson is doing in the UK would turn the constitutional relationship in Germany completely upside down,” Gusy told DW.

Samantha Hawley of Australia’s ABC News network sees only one way out: “A restart button needs pushing.”

For three years, Brexit has “plunged the British Parliament into crisis, providing a stalemate that no leader appears capable of solving”, she says. “For that reason, regardless of the way it comes about, it’s almost certain the people of the United Kingdom will need to go back to the polls.”

However, Hawley notes that given the volatility of the political environment, few commentators will be willing to predict the outcome of such a vote.

“They won’t rule out another hung parliament that would plunge the nation back into the same quagmire it’s already in,” she concludes.

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All Northbound DART trains delayed as gardai deal with man who 'refused to let doors close' at South Dublin Station.
All Northbound DART trains delayed as gardai deal with man who 'refused to let doors close' at South Dublin Station

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