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US News This Week in History: 23 - 29 September

09:10  24 september  2019
09:10  24 september  2019 Source:   mirrorpix.com

Climate strike: 'It is our future. It is everybody's future' - Thousands of Irish students join millions around the world in protest

  Climate strike: 'It is our future. It is everybody's future' - Thousands of Irish students join millions around the world in protest Climate strike: 'It is our future. It is everybody's future' - Thousands of Irish students join millions around the world in protestSixth-year student Rachel Kingston and her friends Saidbh Corcoran, Freya Farrar and Fiadh Daly travelled to the city to register their protest at what they perceive as the failure of the Government to take strong action on the environment.

23 – 29 . By All That's Interesting. Published September 28, 2018. A French historian claims that he has inadvertently uncovered one of the most scandalous mysteries in the art history community — the identity of the nude model who posed for Gustave Courbet’s 1866 painting The Origin of the World.

Today in history – which major historical events happened on 23 September ? Who was born on this date, who died? In which year did the birth or death occur? What Happened On This Day – 23 September . 1965 The Indo-Pakistani War comes to an end after a UN-mandated ceasefire. Also known as the Second

a sunset over a fire: A scene from the Amazonas, a state in Brazil, on Sept. 15. © Bruno Kelly/Reuters A scene from the Amazonas, a state in Brazil, on Sept. 15.

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The Amazon isn’t on fire, Brazil’s Bolsonaro tells the U.N. General Assembly; it’s full of riches

  The Amazon isn’t on fire, Brazil’s Bolsonaro tells the U.N. General Assembly; it’s full of riches In a speech peppered with references to God, socialism and patriotism, he railed against foreign powers and vowed his country will use the Amazon’s resources for development.A special message from MSN: Now is the time to take urgent action to protect our planet. We’re committed to stopping the devastating effects of the climate crisis on people and nature by supporting Friends of the Earth. Join us here.

Weekly Quiz for September 23 - 29 . Did Napoleon Bonaparte graduate from his military academy 42nd out of 51? What year was Nintendo founded in Japan? And more questions from this week in history .

September 29 is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. 93 days remain until the end of the year. 61 BC – Pompey the Great celebrates his third triumph for victories

Since August, as vast stretches of the Amazon rainforest were being reduced to ashes and outrage and calls for action intensified, a group of lawyers and activists who have been advancing a radical idea have seen a silver lining in the unfolding tragedy: One day, a few years from now, they imagined Brazil’s president, Jair Bolsonaro, being hauled to The Hague to stand trial for ecocide, a term broadly understood to mean the willful and widespread destruction of the environment, and one that, they hope, will eventually be on par with other crimes against humanity.

The 'Forest Guardians' of Brazil's Amazon

  The 'Forest Guardians' of Brazil's Amazon Groups of Guajajara tribesmen in Brazil’s Maranhão state patrol their tribal land, seeking to protect it from illegal logging in places with little police presence.

Weekly Quiz for September 23 - 29 . Did Napoleon Bonaparte graduate from his military academy 42nd out of 51? What year was Nintendo founded in Japan? And more questions from this week in history .

Historical events for the 20th of September . See what famous, interesting and notable events happened throughout history on September 20. 1975 David Bowie's "Fame," single goes #1 for 2 weeks . 1984 Suicide car bomb attacks US Embassy annex in Beirut, kills 23 . 1985 Curtis Strong is convicted for selling

There is no international crime today that can be used to neatly hold world leaders or corporate chief executives criminally responsible in peacetime for ecological catastrophes that result in the type of mass displacements and population wipeouts more commonly associated with war crimes. But environmentalists say the world should treat ecocide as a crime against humanity — like genocide — now that the imminent and long-term threats posed by a warming planet are coming into sharper focus.

In Mr. Bolsonaro they have come to see something of an ideal villain tailor-made for a legal test case.

Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro © AP Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro

“He has become a poster boy for the need for a crime of ecocide,” said Jojo Mehta, the co-founder of Stop Ecocide, a group that is seeking to give the International Criminal Court in The Hague the jurisdiction to prosecute leaders and businesses that knowingly cause widespread environmental damage. “It’s awful, but at the same time it’s timely.”

Whistleblower Complaint Alleges Effort to 'Lock Down' Ukraine Call Records

  Whistleblower Complaint Alleges Effort to 'Lock Down' Ukraine Call Records President Trump sought to use the powers of his office to coerce Ukraine to investigate a political rival, and White House officials acted to conceal evidence of the president’s actions, a newly released whistleblower complaint alleges. The whistleblower’s complaint, released Thursday, concerns a July phone call between Mr. Trump and President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine. The controversy has become the biggest political danger to Mr. Trump’s presidency as it rallied House Democrats this week to launch impeachment proceedings.“In the course of my official duties, I have received information from multiple U.S.

Today in history – which major historical events happened on 25 September ? Who was born on this date, who died? In which year did the birth or death occur? What Happened On This Day – 25 September . 2008 China launches Shenzhou spacecraft with 3 astronauts. This was the third human manned space

Historical events for the 25th of September . See what famous, interesting and notable events happened 1844 Canada defeats USA by 23 runs in the 1st cricket international. 1846 US troops under General Zachery Taylor 1988 American sprinter Florence Griffith Joyner wins women's 100m in Olympic record 10.54; beats teammate Evelyn Ashford by 0. 29 ; 1st leg of sprint double at Seoul Games. September in History .

The first prominent call to outlaw ecocide was made in 1972 by Prime Minister Olaf Palme of Sweden, who hosted the United Nations’ first major summit on the environment.

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In his keynote address at the conference, Mr. Palme argued that the world urgently needed a unified approach to safeguard the environment. “The air we breathe is not the property of any one nation, we share it,” he said. “The big oceans are not divided by national frontiers; they are our common property.” That idea got little traction at the time and Mr. Olaf died in 1986 having made little headway in the quest to establish binding principles to protect the environment.

Blackface is an 'entirely acceptable bit of fun', says Conservative MP

  Blackface is an 'entirely acceptable bit of fun', says Conservative MP A senior Conservative MP has described wearing blackface as an "entirely acceptable bit of fun".Sir Desmond Swayne hinted he wore blackface when attending a fancy dress party as soul singer James Brown - and said he "went to some trouble to be as authentic as possible".

a man wearing a hat: President Jair Bolsonaro of Brazil at an Independence Day parade in Brasilia on Sept. 7. © Adriano Machado/Reuters President Jair Bolsonaro of Brazil at an Independence Day parade in Brasilia on Sept. 7.

During the 1980s and 1990s, diplomats considered including ecocide as a grave crime as they debated the authorities of the International Criminal Court, which was primarily established to prosecute war crimes. But when the court’s founding document, known as the Rome Statute, went into force in 2002, language that would have criminalised large-scale environmental destruction had been stripped out at the insistence of major oil producing nations.

In 2016, the court’s top prosecutor signaled an interest in prioritising cases within its jurisdiction that featured the “destruction of the environment, the illegal exploitation of natural resources or the illegal dispossession of land.”

That move came as activists seeking to criminalise ecocide had been laying the groundwork for a landmark change to the court’s remit. Their plan is to get a state that is party to the Rome Statute — or a coalition of them — to propose an amendment to its charter establishing ecocide as a crime against peace. At least two-thirds of the countries that are signatories to the Rome Statute would have to back the initiative to outlaw ecocide for the court to get an expanded mandate, and even then it would only apply to countries that accept the amendment. Still, it could change the way the world thinks about environmental destruction.

Hong Kong Is Winning the Global Public-Opinion War With Beijing

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a man standing next to a tree: Members of the Kayapo indigenous community at a meeting in August. © Leo Correa/Associated Press Members of the Kayapo indigenous community at a meeting in August.

Richard Rogers, a lawyer who specialises in international criminal law and human rights, said that if ecocide campaigners and countries suffering the effects of climate change put forward a narrow definition of the crime, it could quickly garner widespread support. “We’ve seen in the past few years a huge shift in public opinion, and we’re entering a phase where there is going to be huge pressure on governments to do more,” said Mr. Rogers, a partner at Global Diligence, a firm that advises companies and governments on risk mitigation.

Given the number of countries and businesses that would recoil at the prospect of being held criminally responsible for environmental damage, he said, it is vital to come up with criteria that reserve prosecution for cases in which “massive and systematic” environmental destruction is done “knowingly or intentionally.”

Environmental activists say there is no shortage of culprits who could be put on trial if the world were to decide to outlaw ecocide. But few are as compelling as Mr. Bolsonaro, a far-right former Army captain who campaigned on a promise to roll back the land rights of indigenous people and open protected areas of the Amazon to mining, farming and logging.

Hurricane Lorenzo weather forecast as experts unsure how hard it will hit Ireland

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From an evidentiary standpoint, Mr. Bolsonaro is an attractive potential defendant because he has been so starkly disdainful of his own country’s environmental laws and regulations. He vowed to put an end to fines issued by the agency that enforces environmental laws. He has asserted that protecting the environment matters only to vegans. He complains that Brazil’s 1988 Constitution set aside too much land to indigenous communities who “don’t speak our language.”

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Since Mr. Bolsonaro took office in January, deforestation in the Amazon has increased significantly, setting the stage for the thousands of fires that began raging last month. Government agencies tasked with protecting the environment warn meanwhile that they are at a breaking point as a result of budget and personnel cuts.

Mr. Bolsonaro is by no means the only world leader reviled by environmentalists. President Trump has been assailed for rolling back environmental regulations and pulling out of the Paris climate accord.

Facing a cascade of international pressure and a boycott of some Brazilian exports, Mr. Bolsonaro last month ordered a military operation to put out fires in the Amazon. But the government’s overriding message has been that the world’s angst about the Amazon is an unwelcome and unwarranted intrusion on Brazil’s sovereignty.

Video shows Prince Harry reprimanding a Sky News reporter for asking him a question during Malawi hospital visit - just hours before the royal launched attack on the media

  Video shows Prince Harry reprimanding a Sky News reporter for asking him a question during Malawi hospital visit - just hours before the royal launched attack on the media Video shows Prince Harry reprimanding a Sky News reporter for asking him a question during Malawi hospital visit - just hours before the royal launched attack on the media Prince Harry scolded a TV journalist for asking him a question during his visit to a health clinic in Malawi, it emerged today.Sky News royal reporter Rhiannon Mills asked the Duke of Sussex an unscheduled question as he got into a car after a visit to the Mauwa Health Centre on Tuesday.Harry, 35, had told a group of young people to 'hold on to your dreams' while talking to them as he visited the clinic during his ten-day tour of southern Africa.

Eloísa Machado, a law professor at Fundação Getúlio Vargas University in São Paulo, said Mr. Bolsonaro’s dismantling of environmental protections, which have decimated the Amazon’s indigenous communities, may already meet the criteria of crimes against humanity under existing international law. They could, she said, amount to genocide. She and a team of scholars are drafting a complaint the International Criminal Court could use as a blueprint to open an investigation against Brazil.

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a group of stuffed animals that are posing for a photo: The Mascot of the 2022 Olympic Winter Games, Bing Dwen Dwen, is seen unveiled during a launching ceremony at Shougang Ice Hockey Arena on September 17, 2019, in Beijing, China.

There is good reason to be skeptical that the International Criminal Court, which has long been criticized for slow prosecutions and for pursuing a narrow range of cases, could emerge as an effective bulwark against climate change. In nearly two decades the court has won only four convictions, and its caseload has consisted mainly of African leaders.

“The I.C.C. never missed an opportunity to miss an opportunity,” Mr. Rogers said. “But I think it’s a huge opportunity for the I.C.C. to show that it’s a court for the 21st century, a court that adapts to the needs of the people it needs to be serving.”

In the best of cases, campaigners to outlaw ecocide say it would take a few years to muster the support they need to amend Rome Statute. But merely raising the profile of the debate over penalizing ecocide could go a long way toward shaping the risk assessment of corporations and world leaders who until now have regarded environmental disasters mainly as public relations nightmares.

“We use criminal law as the line between what our culture accepts and what it doesn’t,” Ms. Mehta said. “Once you have a criminal law in place you start to change the culture.”

MSN UK is committed to Empowering the Planet and taking urgent action to protect our environment. We’re supporting Friends of the Earth to help solve the climate crisis - please give generously here or find out more about our campaign here.


Video shows Prince Harry reprimanding a Sky News reporter for asking him a question during Malawi hospital visit - just hours before the royal launched attack on the media .
Video shows Prince Harry reprimanding a Sky News reporter for asking him a question during Malawi hospital visit - just hours before the royal launched attack on the media Prince Harry scolded a TV journalist for asking him a question during his visit to a health clinic in Malawi, it emerged today.Sky News royal reporter Rhiannon Mills asked the Duke of Sussex an unscheduled question as he got into a car after a visit to the Mauwa Health Centre on Tuesday.Harry, 35, had told a group of young people to 'hold on to your dreams' while talking to them as he visited the clinic during his ten-day tour of southern Africa.

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