US News: Six wild elephants die after falling into waterfall in Thailand - - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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US News Six wild elephants die after falling into waterfall in Thailand

17:35  05 october  2019
17:35  05 october  2019 Source:   news.sky.com

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Six elephants have fallen to their deaths in Thailand after trying to save each other from a notorious waterfall . Officials said the incident occurred after a baby elephant slipped over the waterfall in southern Thailand 's Khao Yai National Park. A herd of eight elephants died after falling in 1992.

Also known as ‘ Elephant Tusk Falls ’ due to a split in the stream that resembles two elephant tusks, Namtok Ton Nga Chang waterfall is widely considered to be one of southern Thailand ’s finest falls . The waterfall has seven levels in total, with the third being where the stream separates to create the

a snow covered slope: Six wild elephants fell off a deep ravine and drowned in Thailand. Pic: Thai PBS News © Other Six wild elephants fell off a deep ravine and drowned in Thailand. Pic: Thai PBS News Six wild elephants have been found dead at a waterfall in Thailand after falling into a deep ravine and drowning.

Khao Yai national park officials sighted many elephants gathering on a road near Haew Narok waterfall on Thursday and Friday, according to a report submitted to the Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation.

At around 3am on Saturday, officials heard elephant cries coming from the waterfall and went to investigate at dawn.

They discovered a baby elephant, aged about three, drowned in the first tier of the waterfall as two male elephants stood on the edge of the cliff above.

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Forest cover in Thailand fell dramatically by the late 90’s but after logging became illegal in 1989 the forest cover started to recover and the country currently has 37% cover, but this is compared to 75% cover in the early 1900’s when there were over 100,000 wild elephants !

A baby elephant was rescued yesterday after plunging into a three-metre well. Footage from Thailand shows rescuers freeing the male elephant in the dark. Three hours after rescuers opened up the well with a digger, the calf scrambled free and rejoined his mother who had recovered from an earlier

After venturing down the slippery ravine path, park officials discovered the bodies of five adult elephants that had drowned.

Park chief Mr Tunya Netithammakul has since ordered the waterfall to be closed to all visitors.

Officials have also been instructed to move the remaining elephants from the nearby road to prevent them suffering a similar fate.

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