US News: Archaeologists Uncover an 'Early Bronze Age New York' in Northern Israel - - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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US News Archaeologists Uncover an 'Early Bronze Age New York' in Northern Israel

02:00  07 october  2019
02:00  07 october  2019 Source:   newsweek.com

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Israel 's Antiquities Authority has called it the " New York of the early Bronze Age ." Archaeologists in Israel announced Sunday that they had uncovered a 5,000-year-old city north of Tel Aviv. It is the largest Bronze Age urban area found in the region to date and could fundamentally change ideas of

Israeli archaeologists say they have discovered a Bronze Age ‘ New York City’. Archaeologists have unearthed a 5000-year-old “ New York City” in An archaeologist shows a figurine found at a newly-discovered large, 5,000-year-old city in northern Israel . Picture: AP Photo/Tsafrir AbayovSource:AP.

an orange sign on a dirt road: A picture taken on October 06, 2019, shows a warning sign and safety cordons at the archaeological site of En Esur (Ein Asawir) where a 5000-year-old city was uncovered, near the Israeli town of Harish. © Jack Guez/Getty A picture taken on October 06, 2019, shows a warning sign and safety cordons at the archaeological site of En Esur (Ein Asawir) where a 5000-year-old city was uncovered, near the Israeli town of Harish.

Archaeologists have uncovered a 5,000-year-old city thought to be ten times larger than Jericho as well as a 7,000-year-old temple in northern Israel, officials announced Sunday.

The city, En Esur, was located in what is now Israel's Haifa District. It was uncovered across two and half years by professional archaeologists of the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) as well as volunteers, some of whom were teenagers, according to United Press International.

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business. Ancient Bronze Age Settlement Found in Israeli Excavation. As a rule, Israel carries out excavations before it starts big construction projects, to ensure no ancient finds such as these The uncovering of the temple along with figurines of animals, a small stone replica of a human head, a

Archaeological excavations in northern Hasharon uncover vast 5,000-year-old city, one of the first and largest of the ancient Near East.

a person sitting on a rock: Archaeologists at work at the site in northern Israel (Tsafrir Abayov/AP) © Provided by The Press Association Archaeologists at work at the site in northern Israel (Tsafrir Abayov/AP)

Representatives of the IAA described the newly excavated city, located in Israel's Haifa District, as the region's "Early Bronze Age New York." It spanned over 160 acres and is estimated to have had 6,000 inhabitants. While smaller than contemporaneous cities in Mesopotamia and Egypt, En Esur would have dwarfed the more well-known cities of Megiddo and Jericho in southern Israel, according to Haaretz.

Not only was En Esur large in its heyday compared to other ancient Levantine cities, but it was also intricately planned, Haaretz reported. It had large silos designed for efficient food storage, and the roads of its intricate network of streets were covered with plaster and stones to help prevent flooding.

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ArchaeologyIt's the ' Early Bronze Age New York of our region'. In addition, just ahead of the construction of a new interchange over the En Esur (Ein Asawir) archaeological site, IAA archaeologists also discovered an earlier , 7,000-year-old Chalcolithic settlement under several of

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"There is no doubt that this site dramatically changes what we know about the character of the period and the beginning of urbanization of Israel," said Israel Antiquities Authority directors and Dr. Dina Shalem Dr. Yitzhak Paz in a statement.

"By the end of the fourth millennium B.C.E., the site became a city. It is one of the earliest cities known in the southern Levant, and it is the largest by far," Paz told Haaretz.

While excavating the city's ancient houses, archaeologists also found a religious temple that they have concluded is about 2,000 years older than the city.

a group of people on a rocky beach: Archaeologists at work at the site in northern Israel (Tsafrir Abayov/AP) © Tsafrir Abayov Archaeologists at work at the site in northern Israel (Tsafrir Abayov/AP)

They uncovered objects that would have been used in several religious rituals, including charred animal bones probably used in sacrifices, and a large stone basin that was used to hold liquids. Haaretz reported that some of these stone basins weighed between 10 and 15 tons and would have had to been quarried and carried from a site miles away — evincing the care and effort put into the development of En Esur. 

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Archaeologists working for the Israel Antiquities Authority have announced the discovery of a major city, which they are calling a megalopolis. The Times of Israel reports that the city is the “largest Early Bronze Age settlement excavated in Israel ”. Estimates state that the urban center would have

megalopolis were uncovered in northern Israel , the Antiquities Authority announced on Sunday, in one of the most significant archaeological findings in According to the IAA, the city was the largest and most central one in the area during the Bronze Age . According to the archaeologists , about 6

Other human-made objects, including millions of pottery fragments and flint tools, were also discovered at the site, according to UPI.

"These surprising findings allow us, for the first time, to define the cultural characteristics of the inhabitants of this area in ancient times," the Israel Antiquities Authority said.

A figurine found during excavations at the site (Tsafrir Abayov/AP) © Provided by The Press Association A figurine found during excavations at the site (Tsafrir Abayov/AP)

Despite the importance of the findings, the site is still planned to disappear under a new road junction, Haaretz reported.

The Israel Antiquities Authority, which conducted the dig, described itself on its website as "the pre-eminent organization in the field of Israeli archaeology." The organization is responsible for all archaeology in Israel, including the conservation of objects and sites. It protects over 30,000 archaeological sites and boasts two million artifacts in Israel's State Treasures collection, which includes the Dead Sea Scrolls.

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Lost Egyptian temple is unearthed by construction workers on the banks of the Nile 2,200 years after it was built for King Ptolemy IV who was deposed after pretending to be artist and not a pharaoh .
It has laid hidden for over 2,200 years, but during routine drilling work the long-lost temple Pharaoh Ptolemy IV is believed to have been found in a city located on the west bank of the Nile River.The ruins were unearthed in the city of Tama, just north of Sohag, Egypt, on the western bank of the Nile.

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