•   
  •   

US News Back from the dead: Some corals regrow after 'fatal' warming

09:05  10 october  2019
09:05  10 october  2019 Source:   msn.com

In fast-thawing Siberia, radical climate change is warping the Earth beneath the feet of millions

  In fast-thawing Siberia, radical climate change is warping the Earth beneath the feet of millions Extreme climate change is pushing people out of their watery farms and sinking villages into new jobs in the city or on the lucrative mammoth-tusk trail.ON THE ZYRYANKA RIVER, Russia —Andrey Danilov eased his motorboat onto the gravel riverbank, where the bones of a woolly mammoth lay scattered on the beach. A putrid odor filled the air — the stench of ancient plants and animals decomposing after millennia entombed in a frozen purgatory.

Coral are made up of hundreds to thousands of tiny creatures called polyps that secrete a hard outer skeleton of calcium carbonate (limestone) and attach themselves to the ocean It can be seen how the rejuvenated polyp grew back to its original size after shrinking its dimensions and started budding.

“At some point, we saw living polyps in these colonies, which we thought were completely dead ," Kersting told AFP, adding it was a “big surprise." Coral are made up of hundreds to thousands of tiny creatures called polyps that secrete a hard outer skeleton of calcium carbonate (limestone)

In this undated photo released by Science Advances, Cladocora caespitosa coral polyps are seen underwater near the Columbretes Islands in the Mediterranean Sea © Diego K. Kersting In this undated photo released by Science Advances, Cladocora caespitosa coral polyps are seen underwater near the Columbretes Islands in the Mediterranean Sea

A special message from MSN:

Now is the time to take urgent action to protect our planet. We’re committed to stopping the devastating effects of the climate crisis on people and nature by supporting Friends of the Earth. Join us here.

For the first time ever, scientists have found corals that were thought to have been killed by heat stress have recovered, a glimmer of hope for the world's climate change-threatened reefs.

China and Africa are building 'great walls' of trees to hold back the desert. But will it work?

  China and Africa are building 'great walls' of trees to hold back the desert. But will it work? China plans to plant 88 billion trees for its Green Great Wall, which will stretch for almost 5,000 kilometres in a bid to hold back encroaching deserts. And it's not the only country fighting nature with nature.It borrows its name from the massive stone structure built by the Qin Dynasty. But the purpose of the Green Great Wall is not to hold back the barbarians — it's to stop the ever-encroaching deserts.

"At some point, we saw living polyps in these colonies, which we thought were completely dead ," Kersting told AFP, adding it was a "big surprise." Coral are made up of hundreds to thousands of tiny creatures called polyps that secrete a hard outer skeleton of calcium carbonate (limestone) and attach

But some corals aren’t complying with their death sentence. These surviving strips of coral lay deep in shadowy recesses, so they suffered less from the combined effects of heat and sunlight. It could be that these tiny shards of life were able to regrow and rebuild the immense Porites once conditions.

The chance discovery, made by Diego K. Kersting from the Freie University of Berlin and the University of Barcelona during diving expeditions in the Spanish Mediterranean, was reported in the journal Science Advances on Wednesday.

Kersting and co-author Cristina Linares have been carrying out long-term monitoring of 243 colonies of the endangered reef-builder coral Cladocora caespitosa since 2002, allowing them to describe in previous papers recurring warming-related mass mortalities.

a close up of food: For the first time ever, scientists have found that some corals that were thought to have been killed by heat stress have recovered © Diego K. Kersting For the first time ever, scientists have found that some corals that were thought to have been killed by heat stress have recovered

"At some point, we saw living polyps in these colonies, which we thought were completely dead," Kersting told AFP, adding it was a "big surprise."

Extinction Rebellion activists bring protests to Penneys and Brown Thomas

  Extinction Rebellion activists bring protests to Penneys and Brown Thomas Extinction Rebellion activists bring protests to Penneys and Brown ThomasEXTINCTION REBELLION ACTIVISTS brought the protest to Penneys and Brown Thomas stores in Dublin, staging their own fashion show on O’Connell Street this afternoon.

'At some point, we saw living polyps in these colonies'. (PHYS.ORG) For the first time ever, scientists have found corals that were thought to have been killed by heat stress have recovered, a glimmer of hope for the world's climate change-threatened reefs.

"At some point, we saw living polyps in these colonies, which we thought were completely dead ," Kersting told AFP, adding it was a "big surprise." Coral are made up of hundreds to thousands of tiny creatures called polyps that secrete a hard outer skeleton of calcium carbonate (limestone)

Coral are made up of hundreds to thousands of tiny creatures called polyps that secrete a hard outer skeleton of calcium carbonate (limestone) and attach themselves to the ocean floor.

Heat waves kill these animals -- by either essentially roasting them alive or causing them to eject the symbiotic algae that live within them and provide them nutrients, thus leading to coral bleaching.

A quarter of the coral cover of Spain's Columbretes Islands was lost to a particularly extreme heat wave in 2003.

- Time running out -

But the researchers found that in 38 percent of the impacted colonies, the polyps had devised a survival strategy: shrinking their dimensions, partly abandoning their original skeleton, and gradually, over a period of several years, growing back and starting a new skeleton.

a fish swimming under water: In this undated photo released by Science Advances, a Cladocora caespitosa reef is seen underwater near the Columbretes Islands in the Mediterranean Sea © Diego K. Kersting In this undated photo released by Science Advances, a Cladocora caespitosa reef is seen underwater near the Columbretes Islands in the Mediterranean Sea They were then able to gradually re-colonize dead areas through budding.

Mulvaney Says, Then Denies, That Trump Held Back Ukraine Aid as Quid Pro Quo

  Mulvaney Says, Then Denies, That Trump Held Back Ukraine Aid as Quid Pro Quo WASHINGTON — Mick Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff, threw the Trump administration’s defense against impeachment into disarray on Thursday when he said that the White House withheld nearly $400 million in military aid to Ukraine to further President Trump’s political interests. theoryWASHINGTON — Mick Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff, threw the Trump administration’s defense against impeachment into disarray on Thursday when he said that the White House withheld nearly $400 million in military aid to Ukraine to further President Trump’s political interests.

"At some point, we saw living polyps in these colonies, which we thought were completely dead ," Kersting told AFP, adding it was a "big surprise." For the first time ever, scientists have found that some corals that were thought to have been killed by heat stress have recovered.

For the first time ever, scientists have found corals that were thought to have been killed by heat stress have recovered, a glimmer of hope for the world's The chance discovery, made by Diego K. Kersting from the Freie University of Berlin and the University of Barcelona during diving expeditions in the

In order to be sure the polyps were in fact the same animals staging a comeback, rather than new coral created through sexual reproduction, the team used 3D computer imaging to confirm the old, abandoned skeleton was connected to the new structure.

____________________________________________________

More on our empowering the planet campaign:

Make a donation to help our cause

Sign our petition to help prevent plastic in the ocean

Learn how you can ask UK parliament to stop climate change

____________________________________________________

This process of "rejuvenescence" was known to exist in the fossil record but had never before been observed in coral colonies that exist today.

Kersting said the finding opens up the intriguing possibility that other modern corals around the world -- such as those in Australia's dying Great Barrier Reef -- might be applying similar survival strategies, though further investigation is required.

underwater view of a large rock: The discovery means there is a narrow window of opoprtunity to prevent coral reefs from going extinct as a result of climate change © Diego K. Kersting The discovery means there is a narrow window of opoprtunity to prevent coral reefs from going extinct as a result of climate change It also meant that there was a narrow window of opportunity to prevent coral reefs, vital ecosystem engineers that provide shelter for hundreds of species of fish and plants, from going extinct as a result of climate change.

Federal judge rules Trump must turn over his tax returns to Manhattan DA, but Trump has appealed

  Federal judge rules Trump must turn over his tax returns to Manhattan DA, but Trump has appealed The request for eight years of records relates to the DA’s investigation into hush-money payments during the 2016 election.U.S. District Judge Victor Marrero rejected Trump’s argument that the presidency makes him immune to any investigation by any prosecutor.

A quarter of the coral cover of Spain's Columbretes Islands was lost to a particularly extreme heat wave in 2003. In this undated photo released by Science Advances, Cladocora caespitosa coral polyps are seen underwater near the Columbretes Islands in the "At some point, we saw living polyps in these.

Back from the dead : Some corals regrow after ' fatal ' warming . Drill hole location in bivalves was over, or close to, the site of adductor muscle attachment so that venomous saliva can effectively separate muscles from the shell (see bivalve picture with adductor muscle location in grey).

"For sure, it's good news, but what we are seeing now in the Mediterranean Sea and other parts of the world is that these marine heat waves are recurrent -- happening every summer or every second summer," Kersting said.

These corals also grow very slowly -- at a rate of about 3 millimeters a year -- "so if you are having every second summer a heat wave, and it's killing 10 to 15 percent of the cover, I mean, the numbers are clear," he added.

"They actually need help from us. We need to stop climate change, because it's not going to be enough."

MSN UK is committed to Empowering the Planet and taking urgent action to protect our environment. We’re supporting Friends of the Earth to help solve the climate crisis, please give generously here or find out more about our campaign here.

Most overrated? Mattis laughs off Trump barb at charity gala .
NEW YORK (AP) — Former U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis is laughing off an insult hurled at him by President Donald Trump.  NEW YORK (AP) — Former U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis is laughing off an insult hurled at him by President Donald Trump.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!