US News: Lebanon: Whatsapp tax sparks mass protests - - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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US News Lebanon: Whatsapp tax sparks mass protests

12:20  18 october  2019
12:20  18 october  2019 Source:   dw.com

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The mass protest is the second in less than a month. The Red Cross said they transferred 22 people suffering from respiratory problems due to the Lebanon 's interior ministry said about 40 members of is security forces were injured while 60 police officers were reportedly wounded in the clashes.

The measures sparked mass protests in Beirut and other cities. According to media reports, protesters blocked off the Beirut-Damascus international Lebanon has recently been rocked by anti-government protests amid a severe deterioration of the economic situation in the country.

  Lebanon: Whatsapp tax sparks mass protests © Provided by Deutsche Welle Protesters have vented their frustration at several new proposed taxes and other unpopular economic policies. In a state of 'economic emergency,' Lebanon is one of the world's most indebted countries.

The move came after hundreds of protesters took to the streets in anger at the state's handling of economic policies and the tax on calls made through the voice-over-internet protocol (VoIP), used by applications including WhatsApp, Facebook calls and FaceTime.

Police and security forces fired tear gas at protesters as they tried to push through security barriers around the government headquarters.

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Lebanon : Whatsapp tax sparks mass protests 15m ago.

Protests have broken out across Lebanon with thousands of demonstrators blocking roads in various parts of the country to express their outrage over gloomy "The WhatsApp tax is just the spark , this is much deeper. A corrupt, incompetent political class has dragged the country down and created utter

It was one of the biggest demonstrations the country has seen in years.

Telecommunications Minister Mohamed Choucair said that the 20-cent fee will not go into effect and that the Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri had requested the policy reversal.

Protesters demand change

Lebanese demonstrators burn tires and wave their national flag during a protest against dire economic conditions. © Getty Lebanese demonstrators burn tires and wave their national flag during a protest against dire economic conditions. Despite the backdown, protesters continue to demand economic reform.

"We are not here over WhatsApp, we are here over everything: over fuel, food, bread, over everything," said Abdullah, a protester in the capital Beirut.

"We are asking for jobs, for our rights, electricity, water, we are demanding education," said another protester.

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- Hundreds of people protested in Lebanon 's capital today over increasingly difficult living Hundreds of people took to the streets across Lebanon on Thursday to protest dire economic conditions after Protesters in the capital blocked the road to the airport with burning tyres, while others massed near

Hundreds of people took to the streets across Lebanon on Thursday to protest dire economic conditions after a government decision to tax calls made on messaging applications sparked widespread outrage.

Demonstrators gathered in Beirut's Riad al-Solh square, some waving Lebanese flags and chanting, "the people want to topple the regime" and "we need a revolution."

An anti-government protester sets fire on tires to block a road during a protest against government's plans to impose new taxes. © AP An anti-government protester sets fire on tires to block a road during a protest against government's plans to impose new taxes. Protesters burned tires to block roads across the country while some civilians on motorbikes ripped out billboards and discarded them into the flames. Some demonstrators also caused damage to shops and street signs. The mass protest is the second in less than a month.

The Red Cross said they transferred 22 people suffering from respiratory problems due to the police tear gas and that they treated 77 people for various minor injuries on the ground.

Lebanon's interior ministry said about 40 members of is security forces were injured while 60 police officers were reportedly wounded in the clashes.

Hariri announces reforms, so will Lebanon get its revolution?

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Hundreds of people took to the streets across Lebanon on Thursday to protest dire economic conditions after a government decision to tax calls made on messaging applications sparked widespread outrage.

The mass protests forced the government to pull a tax of 20 cents per day for calls made through voice over internet protocol apps such as WhatsApp . Protesters blocked roads across Lebanon with burning tires, broadcasts showed, the second time in less than a month Lebanon has seen

According to local media, two foreign workers choked to death from a protest fire that spread to a nearby building in Beirut and that rescuers were also in the process of pulling out bodies and dousing the flames.

'Economic emergency'

The Lebanese government had declared a state of "economic emergency" after the country experienced a stagnating economy exacerbated by a financial crisis. 

A Lebanese demonstrator flashes signs in front of a fire in a blocked road at Riad Al Solh Square during an anti-government protest against dire economic conditions and new tax regulations on communication. © Getty A Lebanese demonstrator flashes signs in front of a fire in a blocked road at Riad Al Solh Square during an anti-government protest against dire economic conditions and new tax regulations on communication.

In another unpopular decision, Information Minister Jamal al-Jarrah had announced that ministers would discuss a bill to raise value-added tax by 2 percentage points in 2021 and a further 2 percentage points in 2022, until it reached 15%.

The government is seeking new ways to grapple its widening deficit. Lebanon is one of the world's most heavily indebted countries.

mvb/rt (AP, dpa, Reuters)

Leaderless rebellion: how social media enables global protests .
“A single spark can start a prairie fire,” observed Mao Zedong in 1930, as he tried to convince his followers that revolution was possible in China. Almost a century later, Mao’s observation comes to mind as little sparks set off mass demonstrations across the world. In Lebanon, the trigger for protests was a tax on WhatsApp messages. In Chile it was a rise in metro fares. In France, the gilets jaunes protests that began last year were set off by a rise in petrol taxes. Elsewhere, the roots of popular revolt are more clearly political. In Hong Kong, it was an attempt to allow extradition of criminal suspects to China.

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