US News: Explorers set out to find lost WWII ships - - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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US News Explorers set out to find lost WWII ships

08:51  19 october  2019
08:51  19 october  2019 Source:   news.sky.com

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The US lost two ships - the USS Yorktown, which was already heavily damaged when it was hit by torpedos, and the USS Hammann, which went down trying to defend the Yorktown. Retired Navy captain Jack Crawford, who recently turned 100, was among the Yorktown's 2,270 survivors.

Deep-sea explorers scouring the world's oceans for sunken World War II ships are honing in on a Historians consider the Battle of Midway an essential US victory and a key turning point in WWII . Crawford doesn't see much value in these missions to find lost ships , unless they can get some

Video by Associated Press

Deep sea explorers hoping to discover sunken World War Two ships are launching underwater robots in an area where one of the most significant battles of the time took place.

The crew of US research vessel Petrel is scouring the Pacific for warships from the famed Battle of Midway, which is considered by historians to be an essential US victory and a key turning point in WWII.

Weeks of searches around the northwestern Hawaiian Islands - roughly halfway between the US and Japan - have already unearthed one sunken warship, the Japanese aircraft carrier Kaga.

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The Battle of Midway stands out as a decisive confrontation between Japanese and U.S. forces in the Pacific, but many artifacts from The U.S. lost one carrier, the USS Yorktown; one destroyer, the USS Hammann; and 144 aircraft. Before the Kaga discovery, the only other sunken ship that researchers

Deep-sea explorers scouring the world's oceans for sunken World War II ships are focusing in on debris fields deep in the Pacific, in an area Historians consider the Battle of Midway an essential U.S. victory and a key turning point in WWII . "We read about the battles, we know what happened.

a man standing in front of a computer screen: The images of the Kaga were compared to historical records © Other The images of the Kaga were compared to historical records

A piece of the Kaga was found in 1999 but its main wreckage had been missing until now.

The Petrel first used sonar technology to locate the ship, then sent underwater robots to investigate and film.

The footage was compared with historical records and confirmed to be the Kaga.

Until this discovery, only one of the seven ships that was sunk in the Battle of Midway had been located.

The main wreckage of the Kaga had been missing until now © Other The main wreckage of the Kaga had been missing until now

More than 2,000 Japanese soldiers and 300 Americans were killed in the battle, which took place six months after Japan's attack on Pearl Harbour.

The attack from the Japanese Imperial Navy was intended to be a surprise, but US analysts managed to intercept Japanese messages and take the upper hand.

Researchers find second warship from WWII Battle of Midway

  Researchers find second warship from WWII Battle of Midway MIDWAY ATOLL, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (AP) — A crew of deep-sea explorers and historians looking for lost World War II warships have found a second Japanese aircraft carrier that went down in the historic Battle of Midway. Vulcan Inc.'s director of undersea operations Rob Kraft and Naval History and Heritage Command historian Frank Thompson reviewed high frequency sonar images of the warship Sunday and say that its dimensions and location mean it has to be the carrier Akagi.

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group of deep-sea explorers scouring the world’s oceans for sunken World War II ships is honing in on Historians consider the Battle of Midway an essential victory for the U.S. and a key turning point in WWII . to find lost ships , unless they can get some useful information on how the Japanese ships

Four of Japan's aircraft carriers and a cruiser, as well as dozens of fighter planes, were downed by US forces.

The US lost two ships - the USS Yorktown, which was already heavily damaged when it was hit by torpedos, and the USS Hammann, which went down trying to defend the Yorktown.

Explorers have been searching the Pacific near the northwestern Hawaiian Islands © Other Explorers have been searching the Pacific near the northwestern Hawaiian Islands

Retired Navy captain Jack Crawford, who recently turned 100, was among the Yorktown's 2,270 survivors.

He described the moment the torpedoes hit: "Bam! Bam! We get two torpedoes, and I know we're in trouble. As soon as the deck edge began to go under, I knew she wasn't going to last."

Although Mr Crawford does not see much value in finding the lost warships, he did say he would not mind if someone could retrieve his strongbox and the brand-new sword he left in it.

The Petrel crew will be investigating the possible discovery of another ship from the fight this week.

Wrecked Japanese Carriers, Lost in WWII, Are Found in Pacific Depths

  Wrecked Japanese Carriers, Lost in WWII, Are Found in Pacific Depths In the murky depths thousands of feet below the surface of the Pacific Ocean, two Japanese warships that have rested undisturbed since the Battle of Midway in World War II have been discovered. In the past few days, deep sea explorers aboard the Petrel, a 250-foot research vessel that explores historically significant shipwrecks, announced they had located the wreckage of the Japanese carriers Kaga and Akagi, two among the six-carrier fleet used by Japanese aircraft to attack Pearl Harbor in 1941.

Deep-sea explorers scouring the world’s oceans for sunken World War II ships are focusing on debris fields deep in the Pacific, in an area where one of the most decisive battles of the time took place. Inside the search for sunken WWII ships deep in the Pacific. By Associated Press.

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Scientists used underwater robots to film the shipwreck © Other Scientists used underwater robots to film the shipwreck

"We read about the battles, we know what happened. But when you see these wrecks on the bottom of the ocean and everything, you kind of get a feel for what the real price is for war," said historian Frank Thompson, who is onboard the Petrel.

"You see the damage these things took, and it's humbling to watch some of the video of these vessels because they're war graves."

The expedition was launched by the late Paul Allen, the billionaire co-founder of Microsoft, and has found 31 vessels so far.

It is illegal to otherwise disturb the US military gravesites and the exact co-ordinates are kept secret.

The Battle of Midway was a significant WWII fight © Other The Battle of Midway was a significant WWII fight

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