•   
  •   

US News Here's What Happens Now That Boris Johnson Has Been Forced To Request A Brexit Delay

18:25  19 october  2019
18:25  19 october  2019 Source:   huffingtonpost.co.uk

Are Anonymous No.10 Brexit Briefings ‘Revealing Splits In Boris Johnson’s Team’?

  Are Anonymous No.10 Brexit Briefings ‘Revealing Splits In Boris Johnson’s Team’? It’s been another huge political week. The Brexit negotiations nearly collapsed, a delegation of scores of Tories demanded reassurances from their leader and the Queen was dragged into politics again in recent days. Much of the damage has been done after anonymous “Number 10 source” briefings, some or all of which are thought to have emanated from Boris Johnson’s controversial chief of staff, Dominic Cummings.

Boris Johnson has sent a request to the EU for a delay to Brexit - but without his signature. The request was accompanied by a second letter, signed by Mr Johnson , saying he believes a delay would be a mistake. The PM was required by law to ask the EU for an extension to the 31 October

Boris Johnson now legally required to ask the EU to delay Brexit past October 31. But the path to fulfilling his 'do or die' Halloween pledge will now be fraught with difficulty and the chances of a Brexit delay have increased exponentially. It is designed to force the PM to ask for a Brexit delay .

Stephen Barclay, Boris Johnson looking at a man in a suit and tie © PA Wire/PA Images

It had been dubbed “Super Saturday” but today’s much-hyped parliamentary proceedings failed to live up to the name as MPs denied Boris Johnson a vote on his Brexit deal and forced him to ask for a delay to the UK’s withdrawal from the EU.

The passing of the so-called Letwin amendment triggers another bit of legislation - the Benn act - which means Johnson must now write a letter to the EU asking for an Article 50 extension to January 31.

But the PM has insisted: “I will not negotiate a delay”.

So WTF happens now?

Brexit delay 

Nicos Anastasiades, Xavier Bettel, Boris Johnson, Michel Barnier, Leo Varadkar standing in front of a crowd posing for the camera: Johnson with EU leaders at the October European Council summit © PA Wire/PA Images Johnson with EU leaders at the October European Council summit

With the Benn act now triggered, Johnson is compelled by law to write to the EU requesting a Brexit delay by 11pm on Saturday night.

PM 'very confident' MPs will want to vote for Brexit deal on Saturday

  PM 'very confident' MPs will want to vote for Brexit deal on Saturday Boris Johnson says he is confident MPs will want to vote for his new Brexit deal on Saturday. The prime minister told a news conference that his new Brexit agreement is a "great deal for our country".He said Britain will now be able to "come out of the EU as one United Kingdom", despite describing the process as "painful" and "divisive"."The building now begins," he said.Mr Johnson has been negotiating with EU officials to work out the details of his new proposals for Brexit, including solutions to the Irish border problem.

Ms Cherry had earlier said the legal action had been instrumental in forcing Mr Johnson to send the request for an extension. The Benn Act, passed in September, required Mr Johnson to request a three-month Brexit delay unless he could pass a deal or get MPs to approve a no-deal exit by 19

Boris Johnson requests Brexit delay after British lawmakers postpone key vote. LONDON – In a surprise move, opposition and rebel British lawmakers voted Saturday to postpone an important Brexit vote, legally forcing Prime Minister Boris Johnson to request a delay to Britain' s departure from the

The PM has vowed to comply with the law but not to negotiate a delay.

So how does he square that circle? 

__________________________________________________________________

More on this story: 

Johnson vows to press on despite humiliating defeat (Guardian)

Analysis: PM's plan is in the hands of the EU (Sky)

Opinion: Johnson's Brexit deal is unravelling fast (Independent)

__________________________________________________________________

He may write a second letter making clear to the EU that he does not want a delay, or wants one to be as short as possible. 

What next for Brexit? Follow key developments, expert analysis and multiple perspectives as the UK edges closer to leaving the EU

Or he could just not send the letter and take the battle to court, in the faint hope he may be able to run down the clock to October 31 and take Britain out of the EU.

Thousands of anti-Brexit protesters gather in London to march on Parliament as plotting MPs look set to thwart Boris Johnson's deal and delay leaving the EU - (while publicity-seeking eco-activist Mr Broccoli gets in on the act too)

  Thousands of anti-Brexit protesters gather in London to march on Parliament as plotting MPs look set to thwart Boris Johnson's deal and delay leaving the EU - (while publicity-seeking eco-activist Mr Broccoli gets in on the act too) Supporters of the so-called People's Vote campaign group gathered at Park Lane (left) before marching on the Palace of Westminster for a mass rally.Supporters of the so-called People's Vote campaign group have marched on the Palace of Westminster for a mass rally which has drawn tens of thousands from across the UK.

Boris Johnson has sent a letter to Donald Tusk requesting a delay to Brexit , while in another saying such a move would be ‘damaging’. That decision triggered the Benn act which placed the prime minister under a legal obligation to request an extension unless a deal had been approved by 11pm

Boris Johnson will not ask for Brexit delay past October 31 in any circumstances. Anti-No Deal law set to be given Royal Assent today, requiring PM Legal experts say Supreme Court could order civil servant to ask for Brexit delay . Mr Johnson will try to force a snap general election for the second

On Sunday, ambassadors from the other 27 EU countries will meet and decide how to respond to any letter requesting a delay.

The EU could agree with the Benn act’s demand for an Article 50 extension until January 31.

Or it could decide to make the deadline sooner or later, which would trigger an MPs’ vote on whether to accept the EU offer. 

But in reality whatever the EU proposes is likely to be approved, as MPs cannot direct European leaders towards another date.

Vote on the deal 

a group of people standing in front of a crowd posing for the camera: Johnson is likely to present his deal to the Commons next week © PA Wire/PA Images Johnson is likely to present his deal to the Commons next week

The onus will then switch back to Johnson, who will still be hoping to deliver Brexit by October 31 by passing his deal through the Commons and Lords in time.

Commons Leader Jacob Rees-Mogg said the government would try again to have a “meaningful vote” on Johnson’s Brexit deal on Monday but there is confusion over whether this will be allowed.

It's Another Decisive Week In Brexit: What On Earth Happens Now?

  It's Another Decisive Week In Brexit: What On Earth Happens Now? It's Another Decisive Week In Brexit: What On Earth Happens Now?But in the best traditions of Brexit deals, the prime minister looks set to try and bring his back for another meaningful vote on Monday.

Boris Johnson had to ask the EU for an extension to the UK' s 31 October exit date after MPs backed a move to delay approval of the deal on Saturday. But Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said he was confident enough MPs would back the deal next week, and Brexit would still happen by the deadline.

Boris Johnson has done the very thing he said he' d rather be "dead in a ditch" than do: request an extension to article 50 and possibly delay Brexit .

Commons Speaker John Bercow promised more clarity on Monday.

In any case Johnson still have to rush the withdrawal agreement bill (WAB), which will enshrine the deal in law, through parliament by Halloween if he wants to leave the EU by the October 31 deadline.

Gallery: Leave vs Remain - Brexit reveals a divided UK (Photos)

Given the lack of time, it seems likely the government will publish the WAB on Monday and bring it to the Commons for second reading - its first Commons stage - on Tuesday.

If the deal is voted down, all bets are off and we could be entering election or referendum territory - assuming there is a long enough delay to Brexit to allow a public vote to happen.

It the deal passes its first stage, there is still likely to be a huge battle over the timetable for it to be passed through parliament, as laid out in a government programme motion.

Just like the coalition’s failed House of Lords reform bill, it is perfectly possible that some MPs could support the deal at second reading but vote down, or amend, the programme motion because they object to it being rushed through by October 31. 

Those MPs could join opposition parties in order to force a longer timetable, which would be the last nail in the coffin for Johnson’s pledge to leave the EU “do or die” by October 31.

Rebel alliance

Boris Johnson wearing a suit and tie: Jeremy Corbyn could try and force a referendum on Johnson's deal © PA Wire/PA Images Jeremy Corbyn could try and force a referendum on Johnson's deal

A longer timetable could also mean more opportunity for amendments.

MPs could try and attach all sorts of bells, whistles and baubles to the deal - and therefore law.

Expect moves to make the deal subject to a second referendum and perhaps even attempts to tie Johnson’s hands in the second phase of negotiations with Brussels on a long term relationship, for example to ensure Britain remains in the EU customs union to protect the manufacturing industry. 

MPs may also act to try and legally end fears that Johnson’s deal simply puts off a potential no-deal Brexit until the end of the transition period on December 31 2020, if phase two trade deal negotiations end with no agreement being reached.

But what about the Queen’s Speech vote?

Elizabeth II standing in front of a wedding cake © PA Wire/PA Images

There is another complicating factor.

The Queen’s Speech last week reopened parliament and set out the government’s legislative agenda.

A big vote on the entire package is due to fall on Tuesday, but because Johnson does not have a majority he faces the very real chance of defeat.

A defeat would suggest the government is unable to govern and Labour or the SNP would surely then follow it with a vote of no confidence in the PM - assuming a long enough Brexit delay has been secured to hold a general election.

If successful, that would also mean Johnson’s Brexit deal would fall away until after an election.

But the government can simply delay the Queen’s Speech vote until it has passed the WAB, which seems likely given its complicating factors.

So when is Brexit happening?

Wait and see. We might still have an election or second referendum. Or it could happen on time on October 31. Or it could happen a few days or weeks after Halloween.

a group of people standing in front of a crowd posing for the camera: Johnson is likely to present his deal to the Commons next week © PA Wire/PA Images Johnson is likely to present his deal to the Commons next week

Sajid Javid admits Boris Johnson has failed to deliver Brexit by October 31 as EU says it won't decide on extension yet .
Chancellor Sajid Javidhas admitted that Boris Johnson won’t be able to deliver Brexit by October 31, despite saying he would rather “be dead in a ditch” than fail to meet the deadline. Mr Javid told BBC Breakfast: “We have to accept we won’t be able to leave on October 31” but laid the blame firmly at the feet of Parliament and Jeremy Corbyn.

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!