US News: The Window for Brexit May Already Have Closed - - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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US News The Window for Brexit May Already Have Closed

14:45  21 october  2019
14:45  21 october  2019 Source:   msn.com

Man due in court after three men attacked with hammer at Tralee filling station

  Man due in court after three men attacked with hammer at Tralee filling station Man due in court after three men attacked with hammer at Tralee filling stationThe incidents occurred at a filling station in Cloonmore last night at approximately 9pm.

( Brexit was originally scheduled for March 31, but the May government requested and received a six-month extension.) Johnson’s hope is to get a withdrawal agreement in place before October 31, exit by that date, and only then force an election. With Brexit then irrevocable, British voters would confront

These are external links and will open in a new window . Brexit - British exit - refers to the UK leaving the EU. Brexit was originally due to happen on 29 March 2019. That was two years after then Prime Minister Theresa May triggered Article 50 - the formal process to leave - and kicked off negotiations.

a close up of a sign © Henry Nichols / Reuters

Editor's note: Any opinions expressed in this article are those of the author on behalf of our content partner and do not represent the views of MSN or Microsoft

The British people have changed their mind about Brexit. Beginning in the summer of 2017, and accelerating in the summer of 2018 by an ever wider margin, British people have said that they voted wrong in the Brexit referendum of June 2016.

Over that same period, however, Britain’s Conservative Party has become more and more committed to Brexit. Sixty-three percent of Conservative Party supporters would rather see Scotland secede from the United Kingdom than abandon the Brexit project. Sixty-one percent of Conservatives would accept significant damage to the British economy to achieve Brexit. Fifty-nine percent would let Northern Ireland go. Fifty-four percent would rather see the Conservative Party itself destroyed than yield on Brexit.

Nine rushed to hospital after horror fall as Enniskerry GAA team celebrates final win

  Nine rushed to hospital after horror fall as Enniskerry GAA team celebrates final win Video footage shows the celebrants holding a trophy and jumping up and down before falling from the back of the truck . © Getty Ambulance outside a hospital Accident and Emergency department. A Garda spokesman confirmed that the injured were rushed to Tallaght and St Vincent's hospitals, both in Dublin, for treatment. He said: "Gardai at Enniskerry are investigating an incident in which a group of young men were injured when they fell from the trailer of an articulated lorry."The incident occurred in Enniskerry Village this evening at approximately 6.30pm.

" The Window for Brexit May Already Have Closed . Parliament is delaying Johnson’s plan—and generational replacement has undercut its support."

Media captionAndrea Leadsom explains the timetable for Friday's Brexit vote. MPs will be asked to vote again on Brexit on Friday but only on part of the deal negotiated with the EU. They will vote on the withdrawal agreement on the Irish "backstop", divorce bill and citizens' rights.

What next for Brexit? Follow key developments, expert analysis and multiple perspectives as the UK edges closer to leaving the EU

Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks ahead of a vote on his renegotiated Brexit deal, on what has been dubbed © Catalyst Images Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks ahead of a vote on his renegotiated Brexit deal, on what has been dubbed "Super Saturday", in the House of Commons in London, Britain October 19, 2019. ©UK Parliament/Jessica Taylor/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY

So there’s the dilemma for Prime Minister Boris Johnson. His party is demanding something that the country does not want. He cannot pass that “something” through Parliament. Johnson has lost his working majority in Parliament; he has not won a single vote on a single major issue there. But despite solid parliamentary opposition to his project, Johnson cannot give up. His party would tear him apart as it tore apart his predecessors Theresa May and David Cameron if he did. He must push, push, push, and suffer defeat after defeat after defeat. In any previous period of British history, the Johnson government would already have fallen. An election would have been called, and—given the unpopularity of the government’s one big idea—the Conservatives would almost certainly have lost.

Gardai issue warning as car flips over on wet Dublin road in frightening crash

  Gardai issue warning as car flips over on wet Dublin road in frightening crash Gardai issue warning as car flips over on wet Dublin road in frightening crashOfficers shared the image from the single car collision on Twitter and urged motorists to take care while driving in wet conditions.

The EU indicates a short extension beyond the Brexit date of 29 March is possible but only if MPs back agreement. These are external links and will open in a new window . Mrs May has written to Mr Tusk requesting a Brexit delay to 30 June, saying she needed more time to get her deal agreed by

It may not, for example, be able to get approval for its law-making plans for the coming year, as set out in the Queen's Speech. If that deal can't be done in time, there would be the possibility of further delay or leaving without a deal. Circumstances that Brexit has already made all too familiar.

A photograph shows a Loyalist Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) mural in north Belfast on October 19, 2019. - British MPs voted Saturday to delay taking a decision on whether to approve the Brexit deal struck between the government and Brussels. Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionists Party (DUP) members voted against the government and have deep concerns about the deal's provisions for the province, namely on customs, consent and sales taxes. The pro-British DUP's deputy leader Nigel Dodds said their overriding worry was about the © Catalyst Images A photograph shows a Loyalist Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) mural in north Belfast on October 19, 2019. - British MPs voted Saturday to delay taking a decision on whether to approve the Brexit deal struck between the government and Brussels. Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionists Party (DUP) members voted against the government and have deep concerns about the deal's provisions for the province, namely on customs, consent and sales taxes. The pro-British DUP's deputy leader Nigel Dodds said their overriding worry was about the "constitutional and economic integrity" of the United Kingdom. (Photo by Paul Faith / AFP) / TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY JOSEPH STENSON (Photo by PAUL FAITH/AFP via Getty Images) This time, however, the historic British resolution for political crises is unavailable. New rules lock the Johnson government into office until 2022 unless two-thirds of Parliament approve an earlier election. Even if there were an election, Johnson might not lose, because the main opposition party—Labour—has chosen as its leader an extreme leftist who is widely regarded as pathetically inadequate. Jeremy Corbyn’s own parliamentary party has repeatedly tried to get rid of him, accusing him of anti-Semitism, misogyny, and general cluelessness. By a margin of 13 percentage points, British people would prefer even the most painful possible Brexit to a Corbyn-led government.

Gardaí renew appeal for 17-year-old girl missing since last Saturday

  Gardaí renew appeal for 17-year-old girl missing since last Saturday Gardaí renew appeal for 17-year-old girl missing since last SaturdayEvigena Filaj is missing from the Rathfarnham area. She was last seen on 12 October at 9.50am.

Former PM Theresa May gave her first speech on Brexit since she resigned as prime minister - backing the deal, and cracking a joke that she had "a distinct What will the EU make of this? Will it grant a third extension to a UK government that doesn't want it anyway? France and Ireland have already

But even with that caveat in mind, I am happy to make one prediction: the window for a successful revocation of Brexit is closing , and we may already be past the time where it can Not a single one of those events is likely, yet they would all need to happen before March 2019 for Brexit to be revoked.

What is happening in Parliament now is an attempt to find an exit from this dilemma.

Britain's main opposition Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn speaks during the Brexit debate inside the House of Commons parliament in London Saturday Oct. 19, 2019. At the rare weekend sitting of Parliament, Prime Minister Boris Johnson implored legislators to ratify the Brexit deal he struck this week with the other 27 EU leaders. Lawmakers voted Saturday in favour of the 'Letwin Amendment', which seeks to avoid a no-deal Brexit on October 31. (Stephen Pike/House of Commons via AP) © Catalyst Images Britain's main opposition Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn speaks during the Brexit debate inside the House of Commons parliament in London Saturday Oct. 19, 2019. At the rare weekend sitting of Parliament, Prime Minister Boris Johnson implored legislators to ratify the Brexit deal he struck this week with the other 27 EU leaders. Lawmakers voted Saturday in favour of the 'Letwin Amendment', which seeks to avoid a no-deal Brexit on October 31. (Stephen Pike/House of Commons via AP) The great background fact to all the maneuvering is the deadline of October 31, 2019, the date Britain is scheduled to leave the European Union. (Brexit was originally scheduled for March 31, but the May government requested and received a six-month extension.)

  The Window for Brexit May Already Have Closed © Getty

Johnson’s hope is to get a withdrawal agreement in place before October 31, exit by that date, and only then force an election. With Brexit then irrevocable, British voters would confront the stark single-issue choice: Johnson or Corbyn? Johnson could expect to win a five-year mandate to repair the damage he himself inflicted by Brexit.

EU delays Brexit extension decision

  EU delays Brexit extension decision Brussels has agreed to the need for a Brexit extension but will not make a decision on its length until next week. The development comes as Boris Johnson pushes to hold a general election on 12 December. Meanwhile, Downing Street has said if the EU offers a Brexit delay the Government can change the date of departure through secondary legislation, known as a statutory instrument. Political opponents had been holding out for an extension to be granted and so removing the imminent threat of a no-deal exit, before backing an election.

If a Brexit is delayed, the House of Commons might be asked again by the government to back an early general election. If more MPs vote for the no-confidence motion than against it, there would then be a 14-day window to see if the current government - or an alternative one with a new prime

Direct Line insurance says: “In the event of a no-deal Brexit , we have plans to ensure customers are Insurers say they are already incurring hefty costs to organise the cards and prepare their staff in Meanwhile, if your UK-registered car sports an EU flag on its numberplate, you might want to buy a

Anti-Brexit remain in the European Union supporters take part in a © Catalyst Images Anti-Brexit remain in the European Union supporters take part in a "People's Vote" protest march calling for another referendum on Britain's EU membership, in London, Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Britain's Parliament is set to vote in a rare Saturday sitting on Prime Minister Boris Johnson's new deal with the European Union, a decisive moment in the prolonged bid to end the Brexit stalemate. Various scenarios may be put in motion by the vote. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham) But this plan depends on exquisite timing. Dissident Conservatives led by the former front-bencher Oliver Letwin have joined with Liberal Democrats, Scottish Nationalists, and a moderate Labour group led by Hilary Benn to delay and disrupt Johnson’s strategy. Yesterday, Johnson was forced to request a second extension from the EU. If the EU grants the extension, there will be time for more politics before Brexit goes into effect—possibly including a second referendum.

Independent MP Oliver Letwin leaves the BBC Headquarters after his appearance on the Andrew Marr show in London, Britain, October 20 2019. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls © Catalyst Images Independent MP Oliver Letwin leaves the BBC Headquarters after his appearance on the Andrew Marr show in London, Britain, October 20 2019. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls Johnson could try to lead Britain out of the EU despite the extension. Some of his ministers say they are determined to drive forward regardless of public opinion. But Parliament has voted to require affirmative approval by Parliament of a British exit. Johnson would have to defy that vote and arguably break the law to achieve Brexit. The British courts have slapped him down once, when he tried to prorogue Parliament despite lacking a working majority in the House of Commons. If he bolts for Brexit despite the law, the courts will surely slap him down again. While Johnson is a risk-taking politician, he is no Donald Trump: He is not ultimately a lawbreaker.

Main St closed off as firefighters battle 'well developed' Balbriggan blaze

  Main St closed off as firefighters battle 'well developed' Balbriggan blaze Main St closed off as firefighters battle 'well developed' Balbriggan blazeThree units attended a "well developed" fire at a derelict house on Balbriggan Main Street.

Prime Minister Theresa May has to accomplish a feat that almost everyone thinks is impossible: make her draft deal The Conservative Party is split over the wisdom of Brexit as a project, but it is united in The Labour Party, for its part, was already set to vote against the deal that Mrs. May is presenting.

The comments section is closed . To submit a letter to the editor for publication, write to [email protected] What Is Brexit ? The struggle has already cost one prime minister, Theresa May , her job; she announced on May 24 that she would resign after failing to come up with a plan that

Anti-Brexit signs are left in a pile of earth after a protest gathering in London, Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. In a major blow to British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, U.K. lawmakers voted Saturday to postpone a decision on whether to back his Brexit deal with the European Union, throwing a wrench into government plans to leave the bloc at the end of this month. (AP Photo/Alberto Pezzali) © Catalyst Images Anti-Brexit signs are left in a pile of earth after a protest gathering in London, Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. In a major blow to British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, U.K. lawmakers voted Saturday to postpone a decision on whether to back his Brexit deal with the European Union, throwing a wrench into government plans to leave the bloc at the end of this month. (AP Photo/Alberto Pezzali) Johnson’s cross-party parliamentary opponents have the votes to stop early exit. They have the votes to deny an early election. The big question is: Do they have the votes to force a second referendum? A second referendum would be even more bitter and divisive than the first. Anti-EU voters will feel cheated of a victory they have sought for decades—and that they felt they had at last won in 2016. Some pro-Brexit advocates—including the chairman of the Conservative Party!—predict (or threaten) civil unrest if they do not gain their prize.

Leave vs Remain: Images of divided Brexit Britain [Photos]

How real is any of this militant talk? By a two-to-one majority, Britons want a second referendum on final exit from the EU. Polls suggest that this time, the Remain side would almost certainly win, and by a bigger margin than Leave won last time.

Anti-Brexit supporters take shelter from the rain in London, Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Britain's Parliament voted delaying approval of Prime Minister Boris Johnson's new Brexit deal, but Johnson said there will be no new negotiations with the EU. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth) © Catalyst Images Anti-Brexit supporters take shelter from the rain in London, Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Britain's Parliament voted delaying approval of Prime Minister Boris Johnson's new Brexit deal, but Johnson said there will be no new negotiations with the EU. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth) What is driving the change in the U.K. is generational replacement. Until very recently, Britain was marked by a uniquely weak attachment to a “European” identity. On the eve of the Brexit vote, only 15 percent of British people thought of themselves as “European,” by far the lowest level of identification for a big EU state. The most striking and surprising effect of the Brexit debate in the U.K. has been to incubate for the first time a European political identity among the young. You see EU-flag pins on backpacks on the subway, EU flags in windows around the University of London. Since June 2016, 2.5 million young people have entered the British electorate, and about 1.4 million older people have died out of it.

Brexit advocates often use the phrase now or never to convey the urgency they feel. This weekend, the British Parliament decided “not now.” Suddenly, and for the first time since June 2016, “never” looks plausibly like the ultimate outcome.

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General election 2019: Nigel Farage under pressure to 'limit number of Brexit Party candidates’ to help Tories .
Mr Farage is still considering whether to contest all 650 seats in the forthcoming election as he promised when he launched the party , or to focus on a smaller number of Leave-backing areas. © Provided by Johnston Publishing Ltd The move could be a significant factor in whether Mr Johnson is able to increase his party share in the Commons as it will not divide the Brexit vote.

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