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US News The Window for Brexit May Already Have Closed

14:45  21 october  2019
14:45  21 october  2019 Source:   msn.com

Thousands of anti-Brexit protesters gather in London to march on Parliament as plotting MPs look set to thwart Boris Johnson's deal and delay leaving the EU - (while publicity-seeking eco-activist Mr Broccoli gets in on the act too)

  Thousands of anti-Brexit protesters gather in London to march on Parliament as plotting MPs look set to thwart Boris Johnson's deal and delay leaving the EU - (while publicity-seeking eco-activist Mr Broccoli gets in on the act too) Supporters of the so-called People's Vote campaign group gathered at Park Lane (left) before marching on the Palace of Westminster for a mass rally.Supporters of the so-called People's Vote campaign group have marched on the Palace of Westminster for a mass rally which has drawn tens of thousands from across the UK.

( Brexit was originally scheduled for March 31, but the May government requested and received a six-month extension.) Johnson’s hope is to get a withdrawal agreement in place before October 31, exit by that date, and only then force an election. With Brexit then irrevocable, British voters would confront

Related Topics: Europe , United Kingdom , Brexit .

a close up of a sign © Henry Nichols / Reuters

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The British people have changed their mind about Brexit. Beginning in the summer of 2017, and accelerating in the summer of 2018 by an ever wider margin, British people have said that they voted wrong in the Brexit referendum of June 2016.

Over that same period, however, Britain’s Conservative Party has become more and more committed to Brexit. Sixty-three percent of Conservative Party supporters would rather see Scotland secede from the United Kingdom than abandon the Brexit project. Sixty-one percent of Conservatives would accept significant damage to the British economy to achieve Brexit. Fifty-nine percent would let Northern Ireland go. Fifty-four percent would rather see the Conservative Party itself destroyed than yield on Brexit.

Here's What Happens Now That Boris Johnson Has Been Forced To Request A Brexit Delay

  Here's What Happens Now That Boris Johnson Has Been Forced To Request A Brexit Delay Here's What Happens Now That Boris Johnson Has Been Forced To Request A Brexit DelayThe passing of the so-called Letwin amendment triggers another bit of legislation - the Benn act - which means Johnson must now write a letter to the EU asking for an Article 50 extension to January 31.

Instead folks voting for Brexit thought they were going to get all sorts of things they won't. Cameron should have at the very least spelled out on the ballot paper that leaving the EU would mean leaving the single market, as he stated at the time and as has been used by no-dealers ever since.

Close share panel. Related Topics. Brexit . Image copyright Getty Images. Most of that was negotiated by Theresa May 's government. Mr Johnson needed a Brexit extension of his own after MPs failed to get the revised deal passed into law.

What next for Brexit? Follow key developments, expert analysis and multiple perspectives as the UK edges closer to leaving the EU

Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks ahead of a vote on his renegotiated Brexit deal, on what has been dubbed © Catalyst Images Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks ahead of a vote on his renegotiated Brexit deal, on what has been dubbed "Super Saturday", in the House of Commons in London, Britain October 19, 2019. ©UK Parliament/Jessica Taylor/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY

So there’s the dilemma for Prime Minister Boris Johnson. His party is demanding something that the country does not want. He cannot pass that “something” through Parliament. Johnson has lost his working majority in Parliament; he has not won a single vote on a single major issue there. But despite solid parliamentary opposition to his project, Johnson cannot give up. His party would tear him apart as it tore apart his predecessors Theresa May and David Cameron if he did. He must push, push, push, and suffer defeat after defeat after defeat. In any previous period of British history, the Johnson government would already have fallen. An election would have been called, and—given the unpopularity of the government’s one big idea—the Conservatives would almost certainly have lost.

The ‘Messy and Angry’ Prospect of Ireland Reunifying

  The ‘Messy and Angry’ Prospect of Ireland Reunifying Changing demographics and sentiment signal that the possibility of a reunion is increasing. Yet few are prepared for what that means.Then the unforeseen happened. The United Kingdom voted narrowly to leave the European Union. Suddenly, Northern Ireland—which as part of the U.K. had voted to remain in the EU—was to be taken out of the bloc; the border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, an EU member state, would once again be a tangible barrier to movement and trade after a protracted period of near-invisibility. Warnings proliferated of the consequences—economic, security, political—of separating the two sides of the island of Ireland.

Brexit is the withdrawal of the United Kingdom (UK) from the European Union (EU). Following a UK-wide referendum in June 2016, in which 52% voted to leave and 48% voted to remain in the EU

The UK says there is a "serious risk" to the Brexit agreement if its citizens are not treated fairly. He also suggested the 27 EU member states were proving slow to provide help to vulnerable citizens - and there had already been "localised incidents" in which UK citizens had encountered obstacles in trying

A photograph shows a Loyalist Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) mural in north Belfast on October 19, 2019. - British MPs voted Saturday to delay taking a decision on whether to approve the Brexit deal struck between the government and Brussels. Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionists Party (DUP) members voted against the government and have deep concerns about the deal's provisions for the province, namely on customs, consent and sales taxes. The pro-British DUP's deputy leader Nigel Dodds said their overriding worry was about the © Catalyst Images A photograph shows a Loyalist Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) mural in north Belfast on October 19, 2019. - British MPs voted Saturday to delay taking a decision on whether to approve the Brexit deal struck between the government and Brussels. Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionists Party (DUP) members voted against the government and have deep concerns about the deal's provisions for the province, namely on customs, consent and sales taxes. The pro-British DUP's deputy leader Nigel Dodds said their overriding worry was about the "constitutional and economic integrity" of the United Kingdom. (Photo by Paul Faith / AFP) / TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY JOSEPH STENSON (Photo by PAUL FAITH/AFP via Getty Images) This time, however, the historic British resolution for political crises is unavailable. New rules lock the Johnson government into office until 2022 unless two-thirds of Parliament approve an earlier election. Even if there were an election, Johnson might not lose, because the main opposition party—Labour—has chosen as its leader an extreme leftist who is widely regarded as pathetically inadequate. Jeremy Corbyn’s own parliamentary party has repeatedly tried to get rid of him, accusing him of anti-Semitism, misogyny, and general cluelessness. By a margin of 13 percentage points, British people would prefer even the most painful possible Brexit to a Corbyn-led government.

General Election looming to try to sort out Brexit

  General Election looming to try to sort out Brexit Three years after the UK voted to leave the EU and finally, Boris Johnson pulled off something that had felt impossible. He got MPs to back, in principle, a Brexit deal. It was undoubtedly a big moment in parliamentary history.But as ever with Brexit nothing is simple. This was just the first hurdle on the road to getting a deal across the line in Parliament and Mr Johnson's government fell at the next, MPs rejecting his breakneck timetable to convert the Brexit deal into law.Mr Johnson took the glass-half-full approach to it all, as he told MPs it was "welcome, even joyful" that MPs had voted for his deal.

EU rules dictate that, if it wishes to push back the Brexit deadline, the UK - as the leaving member state - has to ask for an extension from the EU. So is the EU likely to extend the Brexit deadline (if asked) because negotiations really are getting somewhere as the prime minister has insisted?

Brexit . The Northern Ireland Secretary Brandon Lewis has said again there will not be a border down the Irish Sea. "The best way to achieve that is to have close to unfettered access both ways as we can possibly get and certainly unfettered access from Northern Ireland to Great Britain is absolutely

What is happening in Parliament now is an attempt to find an exit from this dilemma.

Britain's main opposition Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn speaks during the Brexit debate inside the House of Commons parliament in London Saturday Oct. 19, 2019. At the rare weekend sitting of Parliament, Prime Minister Boris Johnson implored legislators to ratify the Brexit deal he struck this week with the other 27 EU leaders. Lawmakers voted Saturday in favour of the 'Letwin Amendment', which seeks to avoid a no-deal Brexit on October 31. (Stephen Pike/House of Commons via AP) © Catalyst Images Britain's main opposition Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn speaks during the Brexit debate inside the House of Commons parliament in London Saturday Oct. 19, 2019. At the rare weekend sitting of Parliament, Prime Minister Boris Johnson implored legislators to ratify the Brexit deal he struck this week with the other 27 EU leaders. Lawmakers voted Saturday in favour of the 'Letwin Amendment', which seeks to avoid a no-deal Brexit on October 31. (Stephen Pike/House of Commons via AP) The great background fact to all the maneuvering is the deadline of October 31, 2019, the date Britain is scheduled to leave the European Union. (Brexit was originally scheduled for March 31, but the May government requested and received a six-month extension.)

  The Window for Brexit May Already Have Closed © Getty

Johnson’s hope is to get a withdrawal agreement in place before October 31, exit by that date, and only then force an election. With Brexit then irrevocable, British voters would confront the stark single-issue choice: Johnson or Corbyn? Johnson could expect to win a five-year mandate to repair the damage he himself inflicted by Brexit.

Both Tories and Labour are split over a pre-Xmas election

  Both Tories and Labour are split over a pre-Xmas election Boris Johnson on Thursday called for another general election, but in truth he knows he won't get one - yet.Still it was a clever device to distract from the admission he'd rather bury. That he will break his "do or die" promise to leave the EU on 31 October.

The Window for Brexit May Already Have Closed . The English nationalism that powers Brexit is repelling the rest of the United Kingdom.

The Brexit bill has passed its first hurdle, with the UK set to leave the EU on 31 January. Brexit : What happens now? By Peter Barnes Senior elections and political analyst, BBC News. Share this with. These are external links and will open in a new window .

Anti-Brexit remain in the European Union supporters take part in a © Catalyst Images Anti-Brexit remain in the European Union supporters take part in a "People's Vote" protest march calling for another referendum on Britain's EU membership, in London, Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Britain's Parliament is set to vote in a rare Saturday sitting on Prime Minister Boris Johnson's new deal with the European Union, a decisive moment in the prolonged bid to end the Brexit stalemate. Various scenarios may be put in motion by the vote. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham) But this plan depends on exquisite timing. Dissident Conservatives led by the former front-bencher Oliver Letwin have joined with Liberal Democrats, Scottish Nationalists, and a moderate Labour group led by Hilary Benn to delay and disrupt Johnson’s strategy. Yesterday, Johnson was forced to request a second extension from the EU. If the EU grants the extension, there will be time for more politics before Brexit goes into effect—possibly including a second referendum.

Independent MP Oliver Letwin leaves the BBC Headquarters after his appearance on the Andrew Marr show in London, Britain, October 20 2019. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls © Catalyst Images Independent MP Oliver Letwin leaves the BBC Headquarters after his appearance on the Andrew Marr show in London, Britain, October 20 2019. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls Johnson could try to lead Britain out of the EU despite the extension. Some of his ministers say they are determined to drive forward regardless of public opinion. But Parliament has voted to require affirmative approval by Parliament of a British exit. Johnson would have to defy that vote and arguably break the law to achieve Brexit. The British courts have slapped him down once, when he tried to prorogue Parliament despite lacking a working majority in the House of Commons. If he bolts for Brexit despite the law, the courts will surely slap him down again. While Johnson is a risk-taking politician, he is no Donald Trump: He is not ultimately a lawbreaker.

Sajid Javid admits Boris Johnson has failed to deliver Brexit by October 31 as EU says it won't decide on extension yet

  Sajid Javid admits Boris Johnson has failed to deliver Brexit by October 31 as EU says it won't decide on extension yet Chancellor Sajid Javidhas admitted that Boris Johnson won’t be able to deliver Brexit by October 31, despite saying he would rather “be dead in a ditch” than fail to meet the deadline. Mr Javid told BBC Breakfast: “We have to accept we won’t be able to leave on October 31” but laid the blame firmly at the feet of Parliament and Jeremy Corbyn.

Anti-Brexit signs are left in a pile of earth after a protest gathering in London, Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. In a major blow to British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, U.K. lawmakers voted Saturday to postpone a decision on whether to back his Brexit deal with the European Union, throwing a wrench into government plans to leave the bloc at the end of this month. (AP Photo/Alberto Pezzali) © Catalyst Images Anti-Brexit signs are left in a pile of earth after a protest gathering in London, Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. In a major blow to British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, U.K. lawmakers voted Saturday to postpone a decision on whether to back his Brexit deal with the European Union, throwing a wrench into government plans to leave the bloc at the end of this month. (AP Photo/Alberto Pezzali) Johnson’s cross-party parliamentary opponents have the votes to stop early exit. They have the votes to deny an early election. The big question is: Do they have the votes to force a second referendum? A second referendum would be even more bitter and divisive than the first. Anti-EU voters will feel cheated of a victory they have sought for decades—and that they felt they had at last won in 2016. Some pro-Brexit advocates—including the chairman of the Conservative Party!—predict (or threaten) civil unrest if they do not gain their prize.

Leave vs Remain: Images of divided Brexit Britain [Photos]

How real is any of this militant talk? By a two-to-one majority, Britons want a second referendum on final exit from the EU. Polls suggest that this time, the Remain side would almost certainly win, and by a bigger margin than Leave won last time.

Anti-Brexit supporters take shelter from the rain in London, Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Britain's Parliament voted delaying approval of Prime Minister Boris Johnson's new Brexit deal, but Johnson said there will be no new negotiations with the EU. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth) © Catalyst Images Anti-Brexit supporters take shelter from the rain in London, Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Britain's Parliament voted delaying approval of Prime Minister Boris Johnson's new Brexit deal, but Johnson said there will be no new negotiations with the EU. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth) What is driving the change in the U.K. is generational replacement. Until very recently, Britain was marked by a uniquely weak attachment to a “European” identity. On the eve of the Brexit vote, only 15 percent of British people thought of themselves as “European,” by far the lowest level of identification for a big EU state. The most striking and surprising effect of the Brexit debate in the U.K. has been to incubate for the first time a European political identity among the young. You see EU-flag pins on backpacks on the subway, EU flags in windows around the University of London. Since June 2016, 2.5 million young people have entered the British electorate, and about 1.4 million older people have died out of it.

Brexit advocates often use the phrase now or never to convey the urgency they feel. This weekend, the British Parliament decided “not now.” Suddenly, and for the first time since June 2016, “never” looks plausibly like the ultimate outcome.

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'The idea that we're all simple northerners is causing widespread offence': The people of Workington hit back at 'stereotypical' think-tank study by ex-David Cameron aide that paints them as key to winning next election .
Men from Workington, a coastal town in the North West, today trashed the buzzword being used in Westminster, saying it describes someone from the 1970s, not 2019. © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited But hotelier Grant Payne, 74, said other issues apart from Brexit would influence voters in the town Allan Mitchell, 53, a civil servant from Workington, said people from the area 'don't like being patronised' and the concept could backfire on the Tories.

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