US News: Natural History Museum is branded sexist... for not having enough female animal exhibits - - PressFrom - United Kingdom
  •   
  •   

US News Natural History Museum is branded sexist... for not having enough female animal exhibits

07:00  23 october  2019
07:00  23 october  2019 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

Law Society claims 'tits and filth' WhatsApp group contained no reference to female students

  Law Society claims 'tits and filth' WhatsApp group contained no reference to female students Law Society claims 'tits and filth' WhatsApp group contained no reference to female studentsA number of messaging services were blocked from the wifi network at the Law Society after inappropriate content was reported to have been circulated among male students, including in a WhatsApp group titled ‘tits and filth’.

Mane man: A lion exhibit at the Natural History Museum in London. Museums are home to so-called reference animals – the official specimen for each species to which new animals must be compared. Share or comment on this article: Natural History Museum branded sexist for not

Museum collections (stock image of the Natural History Museum ) are dominated by male animals with their flashy antlers and feathers. They may seem like a harmless place to take the children at the weekend to learn about whales and dinosaurs. But natural history museums are sexist and

The Natural History Museum is one of the most favorite museum for tourist in London. © Bikeworldtravel The Natural History Museum is one of the most favorite museum for tourist in London.

Although progress is being made against sexism, there are still pockets of resistance... such as among long-dead exhibits at the Natural History Museum.

A study of five museums found that women weren't the only females forced to fight sexism – apparently leopards and lions face it, too, with the famous London collection and others accused of being prejudiced.

File video: Duchess of Cambridge visits the Natural History Museum (ITN News)

Researchers looked at more than two million animals at the Natural History Museum, the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington DC, the Field Museum in Chicago, the American Museum of Natural History in New York and the French National Museum of Natural History. 

A marmot’s final moment before becoming fox food wins an award — and tells us about climate change

  A marmot’s final moment before becoming fox food wins an award — and tells us about climate change Yongqing Bao captured an image just before the two animals clashed, which caught the judges' eyes for everything it conveyed.“The Moment” was rare yet relatable.

The Natural History Museum in London is a natural history museum that exhibits a vast range of specimens from various segments of natural history .

The Natural History Museum is not something you can see in one day, at least not as it’s meant to be seen anyway. On our first visit, the museum ’s popular dinosaur gallery monopolized We started in the gallery of preserved animals and said hello to a sloth and a giant polar bear among other mammals.

Male birds outnumbered females by 60 per cent to 40 per cent, while mammals were 52 per cent male.

Gallery: The world's most beautiful museums (Love Exploring)

a bird sitting on top of a building: There are approximately 55,000 museums in the world so it's no surprise that the museum buildings themselves are often groundbreaking futuristic masterpieces or some of the most significant and historic architectural structures. From a building that moves to a museum located inside a three-headed elephant sculpture, cue the wanderlust as we take a look at the world's most beautiful museums.

Museums are home to so-called reference animals – the official specimen for each species to which new animals must be compared.

Among these important animals, only 27 per cent of birds and 39 per cent of mammals were female. 

The Natural History Museum on 16, February 2011 in London. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images) The Natural History Museum on 16, February 2011 in London. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)

Perhaps it's the peacock's showy tail, the lion's mane and the antlers grown by stags that can make them bigger crowd-pleasers.

The problem, according to researchers, is that leaving out female members of the animal kingdom may be bad for science.

a dog sitting in front of a mirror posing for the camera: Mane man: A lion exhibit at the Natural History Museum in London © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Mane man: A lion exhibit at the Natural History Museum in London

It is harder to classify females into the correct species when there are not many to refer to.

An Post promises to reduce 3.7% gender pay gap

  An Post promises to reduce 3.7% gender pay gap An Post promises to reduce 3.7% gender pay gapThis is compared to 13.9% nationally.

The Southern Vermont Natural History Museum fosters an interest in nature , the environment and the natural sciences through exhibition and educational activities. The museum displays one of New England's largest collections of native species along with live animal exhibits , ecology

Dinosaurs are so big and otherworldly, much like the blue whale. What better reminder of our responsibility to a planet we are altering at an unprecedented rate.

The study published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B calls for this to be redressed. 

a close up of an animal: Brown bear on display at the Natural History Museum in London. It is harder to classify females into the correct species when there are not many to refer to © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Brown bear on display at the Natural History Museum in London. It is harder to classify females into the correct species when there are not many to refer to

Study author Dr Natalie Cooper, of the Natural History Museum, said: 'There is a tendency for the people collecting to want to get the largest grizzly bear or the animal with the most impressive horns.'

a flock of birds sitting on top of a table: An ostrich on display at the Natural History Museum in London. A study of five museums found that women weren't the only females forced to fight sexism © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited An ostrich on display at the Natural History Museum in London. A study of five museums found that women weren't the only females forced to fight sexism

The animals were collected between 1751 and 2018, but things didn't get better with time. Dr Cooper said: 'Interestingly, we see no improvement. Even recent collections are biased.'

MSN UK is committed to Empowering the Planet and taking urgent action to protect our environment. We’re supporting Friends of the Earth to help solve the climate crisis, please give generously here or find out more about our campaign here.


Diane Abbott demands crackdown on anonymity of online trolls as women MPs step down .
Diane Abbott demands crackdown on anonymity of online trolls as women MPs step downA recent study found that the shadow Home Secretary received nearly half of all abusive tweets sent to female MPs.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!